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Europe's AMD-Powered LUMI Supercomputer Continues With Code Porting, Open-Source Tuning

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  • Europe's AMD-Powered LUMI Supercomputer Continues With Code Porting, Open-Source Tuning

    Phoronix: Europe's AMD-Powered LUMI Supercomputer Continues With Code Porting, Open-Source Tuning

    The LUMI supercomputer in Finland is still being assembled with its 2,560 nodes consisting of a 64-core AMD Trento CPU and four AMD Instinct MI250X GPU accelerators per node. This 375+ PFLOPs was supposed to come online by the end of 2021 but was challenged by the supply chain crisis and is now aiming for general availability by the middle of the year. While the hardware is still coming together, their HPC engineers have been hard at work optimizing the open-source Linux software stack...

    https://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pa...SS-Tuning-2022

  • #2
    Also take a look at Lumi's software side of things, which will be the most relevant to its users:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hZezVG6lJNk

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    • #3
      Porting CUDA code, eh? I haven't much sympathy for them. Things like OpenCL will only catch on and become mainstream if users with clout push for it and push on it, when delivered.

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      • #4
        I guess that's why I still can't get my PS5.
        I hate supercomputing

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        • #5
          "I guess that's why I still can't get my PS5.
          I hate supercomputing"

          You win the internet in the category of dumbest comment of the year.

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          • #6
            Although we all hate/dislike ROCm for not being "user-friendly" for developers, the numbers and solutions available to turn a CUDA codebase into something portable are really impressive, ROCm is made for HPC unfortunately

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            • #7
              Originally posted by horizonbrave View Post
              I guess that's why I still can't get my PS5.
              I hate supercomputing
              I'm sure miners are a bigger factor. The number of supercomputer nodes out there is tiny, by comparison.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by andrei_me View Post
                Although we all hate/dislike ROCm for not being "user-friendly" for developers, the numbers and solutions available to turn a CUDA codebase into something portable are really impressive, ROCm is made for HPC unfortunately
                If it was "made for" anything it would be more correct to say that ROCm was made for ML/AI, but it is as general-purpose as CUDA.

                If you wanted to say that the hardware support focus over the last couple of years favoured data center hardware rather than desktop/laptop hardware that would be true, but we are catching up on that as well.
                Test signature

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                • #9
                  Thank you, would have missed the talk otherwise

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by bridgman View Post

                    If it was "made for" anything it would be more correct to say that ROCm was made for ML/AI, but it is as general-purpose as CUDA.

                    If you wanted to say that the hardware support focus over the last couple of years favoured data center hardware rather than desktop/laptop hardware that would be true, but we are catching up on that as well.
                    Then go for it!
                    We appreciate all improvements. - Even on old Polaris (with PCIe 2.0 systems).

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