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The Big Batch Of New AMD RDNA2 PCI IDs Is Heading To Linux 5.15

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  • #11
    Originally posted by pWe00Iri3e7Z9lHOX2Qx View Post

    I think the poster just meant that Polaris would be next on the chopping block. AMD just moved the pre Polaris stuff to legacy status in June of this year. So I imagine it will be a while before Polaris meets the same fate. And it matters less to most Linux users since they are probably using the mainline Radeon or AMDGPU drivers.

    https://community.amd.com/t5/blogs/p...-6/ba-p/477423
    That is correct except I would add that AMD seems to be in a hurry to put every thing pre RDNA behind them. They never finished Vega and stopped working on it as they often do on Linux. The distro drivers don't do openCL with image support so for any one that needs that they are useless. I was hoping there would be some emphasis on that with the RH9 planning but it got left on the floor so we aren't likely to see it until RH10 in another decade.

    The good news for me is that the only way I can get openCL working is to dual boot to Centos and run the AMDGPU-pro drivers that can't be updated with out re-installing the entire OS so they never ever get updated. It's like being the company with the server in the back of the server room loaded with Cobal code that they pray never dies.

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    • #12
      Since TSMC is turning a lot of '7nm' into '6nm' with process improvements, that would explain AMD making new product designations, even if it's basically the same node. The RX 580 became the RX 590 that way when Polaris moved from GF 14 to GF 12. I haven't seen any proof that's what is happening, though.

      I certainly hope AMD keeps using TSMC 7/6 and GF 12LP+ for any products that make sense.

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      • #13
        Originally posted by perpetually high View Post
        They don't even care to budget $500 to give Michael some review samples.
        Not sure I understand this. IIRC we sent Michael a 6800XT, 6800, 6700XT and 6600XT on the dGPU side along with a mix of Epyc and Ryzen parts on the CPU side.

        APU sampling has been spotty recently but it seems to have been that way for Windows as well as Linux. Last time we launched DIY APUs was the 3xxx series a few years back, so they might just be out of practice.
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        • #14
          Originally posted by perpetually high View Post

          Exactly what I wanted to hear, thanks.

          One of the beautiful (positive) side effects of open source software.

          You hear that nvidia? Pay attention. Your greediness and shortsightedness is costing you in more ways than one.
          Realistically I don't think it hurts them in any meaningful way. Despite the teeth gnashing here, Nvidia's proprietary driver support is quite long lived. Kepler hit retail in early 2012. A nearly 10 year old card is still fully supported in the production branch (i.e. even those old cards can get game specific optimizations). The 470 driver will also be a LTSB, meaning it will continue to get security/bug fixes until 2024 once there is a new production branch. Then it will end up in a legacy driver, which will still get updated for new kernels for years. People are still using cards from at least the 340 legacy branch on kernel 5.13 with Debian Sid and Arch. That's 8800 GTX old from 2006. Anyone still rocking hardware that old (and comparatively slow by today's standards) isn't exactly the spendy type who is going to boost new RTX sales through the roof.

          tl;dr: The drivers are proprietary, but the support is quite good in terms of duration, feature set across the range of SKUs, and timeliness.

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          • #15
            Originally posted by bridgman View Post

            Not sure I understand this. IIRC we sent Michael a 6800XT, 6800, 6700XT and 6600XT on the dGPU side along with a mix of Epyc and Ryzen parts on the CPU side.

            APU sampling has been spotty recently but it seems to have been that way for Windows as well as Linux. Last time we launched DIY APUs was the 3xxx series a few years back, so they might just be out of practice.
            Fair, I appreciate you acknowledging and responding to it. I just feel like it is a net-gain for literally everyone and in all of our best interest to get new hardware out to Michael so he can really go at it and see what's what. He's a valuable resource to AMD and the Linux community. Been that way for almost a couple decades, I'm just saying.

            Anyways, not my battle, but thanks again. We appreciate you, agd5f, and others that are making things happen. Cheers

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            • #16
              Originally posted by pWe00Iri3e7Z9lHOX2Qx View Post

              Realistically I don't think it hurts them in any meaningful way.
              I get where you're coming from, but I think not only does it hurt them, but it hurts all of us. Have to trust me on this. They'll eventually come around, when is the question.

              I have a 2010 MacBook Pro, no longer supported by Apple. Wiped it, and installed Ubuntu 20.04 LTS. Comes with 5.4 kernel and nvidia-340 (EOL, last supported kernel is 5.4, so I'm good until 2025). When 2025 comes, I'll have to make a choice on what my next move is. I'll know that laptop is still perfectly viable hardware for my use-case on it.

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              • #17
                Someone commented asking how to get OpenCL support going and deleted it.

                I went looking after I saw it and found it so I'll share it in case anyone is interested how to get OpenCL working with Polaris/RX480/Vega/etc. From 3 years ago but should still be able to still get you most of the way there.

                See here: https://www.phoronix.com/forums/foru...397#post996397

                edit: Newer details with working OpenCL with Ubuntu 20.04 LTS and RX480/Polaris/Vega/etc in a post below. Quick link here
                Last edited by perpetually high; 04 September 2021, 12:10 AM.

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                • #18
                  I'm hoping my new 6600 XT actually gets recognised by the system as one at some point rather than a "DIMGREY_CAVEFISH".

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                  • #19
                    Originally posted by perpetually high View Post
                    Someone commented asking how to get OpenCL support going and deleted it.

                    I went looking after I saw it and found it so I'll share it in case anyone is interested how to get OpenCL working with Polaris/RX480/Vega/etc. From 3 years ago but should still be able to still get you most of the way there.

                    See here: https://www.phoronix.com/forums/foru...397#post996397
                    This is much newer and may be of use to some one. I haven't tested it as I can't risk it on my machine. The theory is the same as ROCm is in theory supposed to work. It relies on the distro mesa and then just pulls in the final parts it needs. In any case the Resolve install forum is THE place if your tryiing to figure out how to get openCL working on Linux.

                    https://forum.blackmagicdesign.com/v...script#p758053

                    BMD looks at AMD the same way that Linus looks at NVidia.

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                    • #20
                      Originally posted by perpetually high View Post

                      I get where you're coming from, but I think not only does it hurt them, but it hurts all of us. Have to trust me on this. They'll eventually come around, when is the question.

                      I have a 2010 MacBook Pro, no longer supported by Apple. Wiped it, and installed Ubuntu 20.04 LTS. Comes with 5.4 kernel and nvidia-340 (EOL, last supported kernel is 5.4, so I'm good until 2025). When 2025 comes, I'll have to make a choice on what my next move is. I'll know that laptop is still perfectly viable hardware for my use-case on it.
                      Again, while it makes things a bit more difficult for us, I don't think it is really hurting Nvidia. I'd love it if the drivers were open source, but people clinging to hardware that's over a decade old obviously aren't going to be a priority from a ROI perspective. I have a bunch of old GCN 1.0 GPUs (7750, 7850, 7870 Ghz Ed) still trucking along as well as old Maxwell 1.0/2.0 parts (K2200, M2000). I'm not driving a lot of GPU revenue for either company, and the support windows are so long even on the proprietary side that they aren't an impediment for the majority of users, especially ones on a faster refresh cycle that they care more about (because $$$).

                      I'm already way past a desired upgrade due to the mining BS and pandemic. I'd prefer open source, but I'd also happily be replacing some of these now with a 3060/Ti if I could get them for MSRP. Even for my frugal self running hardware for 10+ years, the support duration is fine. What would be even better than Nvidia open sourcing their drivers would be if Intel could release a solid 1080p card for <=$250, and ideally do it with their own fab capacity. A 3rd competitor at the midrange sweet spot (who also happens to have excellent open source drivers) getting more supply into the market is what we really need right now.

                      The worst I've been burned on GPUs was actually on the AMD side with Switchable Graphics. The Windows drivers were OEM distributed (meaning support stopped quickly), and AMD backtracked on a promise to make it back to SandyBridge with their own driver initiative. I have a perfectly good HP Envy 15 that would have been saved by this. It's a quad core eight thread i7 with 16GB of memory, SSD, nice 1080p IPS display. It would make a fine system, but the last non-hacky Windows driver I can get is for Windows 8 from HP. On the Linux side with mainline drivers it's a shit show of artifacts (e.g. half the screen will randomly turn black). The drivers being open source isn't always a savior in and of itself.

                      And you'll be fine at least until 2026 with 5.10 on Ubuntu (and probably longer).

                      https://launchpad.net/~kelebek333/+a.../nvidia-legacy

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