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Radeon ROCm 4.1 Released - Still Without RDNA GPU Support

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  • bridgman
    replied
    Originally posted by atomsymbol View Post
    If you had tried to run OpenCL apps on a RDNA card with ROCm 4 then you would know that it works fairly well. bridgman In my opinion, it is a mistake that the partial/unofficial support for RDNA GPUs isn't mentioned in ROCm README files.
    Good point - I don't think that all the fixes from 20.45 have worked their way into the ROCm release stream yet but we should definitely mention that once the functionality is there.

    It's possible that we may have to work through at least conceptually separating "the upstream for our compute components" from "our datacenter releases" as a pre-requisite since right now the ROCm releases kinda serve as both. That is going to be an increasing problem as we expand support to consumer hardware.

    Thanks !
    Last edited by bridgman; 24 March 2021, 12:19 AM.

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  • atomsymbol
    replied
    Originally posted by phoronix_is_awesome View Post
    ROCm is dead. It is amazing that many years after the release of RDNA 1, AMD still doesn't have ROCm support for it, yet AMD wants to sell a overclocked 192bit RDNA2 chip without compute at Nvidia ampere 256bit GA104 prices by intentionally busting its 8Gb VRAM buffer because it is "designed for gaming at max 1440P settings". What a joke.
    If you had tried to run OpenCL apps on a RDNA card with ROCm 4 then you would know that it works fairly well. bridgman In my opinion, it is a mistake that the partial/unofficial support for RDNA GPUs isn't mentioned in ROCm README files.

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  • extremesquared
    replied
    Surely there is real brand damage caused by entire student bodies -- year one through year four -- of four-year comp sci programs running nvidia cards on personal comps. This is damage that can't be measured by just watching the market for purely gaming-oriented consumers.

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  • bridgman
    replied
    Originally posted by phoronix_is_awesome View Post
    ROCm is dead. It is amazing that many years after the release of RDNA 1, AMD still doesn't have ROCm support for it, yet AMD wants to sell a overclocked 192bit RDNA2 chip without compute at Nvidia ampere 256bit GA104 prices by intentionally busting its 8Gb VRAM buffer because it is "designed for gaming at max 1440P settings". What a joke. Milan, as reviewed by anandtech, is also partly a regression in idle power due to subpar IO Hub chip L3 cache design. What a disappointment.
    I'll skip over how 20 months becomes "many years" but I do need to point out that the IO chip does not include L3, just data fabric and memory controllers. The IO hub is actually pretty much the same between Zen2 and Zen3.

    My understanding (subject to confirmation) is that the higher idle power was a consequence of running the Infinity fabric at 1:1 rather than 1:2 with 3200 MHz memory, not sure if that is something we can address with power management firmware over time.
    Last edited by bridgman; 24 March 2021, 12:15 AM.

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  • bridgman
    replied
    Originally posted by vegabook View Post
    Let's see if this doesn't smash my 5.8 LTS 20.04 like the last 4.01 release did. Here we go! 🙏 .... (Vega 20. No "RDNA is for gaming" excuses).
    The kernel version restrictions only apply to the rock-dkms packaged kernel driver. If you install the rocm-dev metapackage over your existing kernel driver that should give you what you need.

    https://rocmdocs.amd.com/en/latest/I...r-AMD-GPU.html

    And yes that information is much harder to find than it should be. Trying to get that improved.

    The dkms driver from the 20.50 amdgpu packaged driver includes support for the 5.8 kernel and is tested with the ROCm components up to OpenCL, but that only shipped a couple of days ago and hasn't made it into the ROCm stack releases yet.
    Last edited by bridgman; 23 March 2021, 10:29 PM.

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  • phoronix_is_awesome
    replied
    ROCm is dead. It is amazing that many years after the release of RDNA 1, AMD still doesn't have ROCm support for it, yet AMD wants to sell a overclocked 192bit RDNA2 chip without compute at Nvidia ampere 256bit GA104 prices by intentionally busting its 8Gb VRAM buffer because it is "designed for gaming at max 1440P settings". What a joke. Milan, as reviewed by anandtech, is also partly a regression in idle power due to subpar IO Hub chip L3 cache design. What a disappointment.

    Leave a comment:


  • vegabook
    replied
    Let's see if this doesn't smash my 5.8 LTS 20.04 like the last 4.01 release did. Here we go! 🙏 .... (Vega 20. No "RDNA is for gaming" excuses).

    EDIT:

    Pah! No point. From the README. I'm not going to waste my time, Same old story as 4.01.



    Time to flog the Radeon VII to the crypto guys who can actually make use of its compute, and succumb to buying a 3070 or 3080 for which I won't be begging for software support.
    Last edited by vegabook; 23 March 2021, 09:47 PM.

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  • Radeon ROCm 4.1 Released - Still Without RDNA GPU Support

    Phoronix: Radeon ROCm 4.1 Released - Still Without RDNA GPU Support

    ROCm 4.0 released back in December with "CDNA" GPU support while now ROCm 4.1 has been released as the newest quarterly feature release to this open-source Radeon compute stack focused primarily on HPC/data-center needs...

    https://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pa...m-4.1-Released
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