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  • #41
    Originally posted by coder View Post
    Not for servers, which already use registered memory and stand to benefit most from a more scalable memory architecture. But you really can't say it's not more expensive to put a memory controller on every DIMM, rather than just have one inside the CPU. There's a reason why they moved it from the motherboard (where it was previously part of what was once called a "Northbridge" chip) and into the CPU!
    If your existing RAM is already close to maxing out the link speed, then it's also no benefit! Indeed, from what I see, the point is really about scaling capacity, rather than scaling speed. The way they get speed benefits is simply by decoupling the RAM from the CPU, so they can scale up the number of channels.
    just do some computer history.. SDRAM DDR1 DDR2 DDR3 DDR4 DDR5...
    thry did ram in 13nm in 64nm in 34nm in 24nm in 16 nm in 10nm in 7nm in 5nm
    and the ram price per GB drop down ddr1 was more expensive per 1gb than ddr2 and ddr3 is more expensive per GB than ddr4 and as soon as the ram is build in smaler nm node the price per GB goes down.

    so even if your claim is right and you do not get higher performance because your ram is maxing out the link speed
    then it is true that you get more and more GB of ram for less and less money.

    the first ram and first IBM power9 system maybe is high so you say it is expensive but over the long run scaling capacity on old systems become more and more cheap lets say you have an stone age old system 10 years... you will get a lot of ram very cheap if you jump from ddr3 to ddr4 to ddr5 and ddr6...

    "The way they get speed benefits is simply by decoupling the RAM from the CPU, so they can scale up the number of channels"

    and this sounds also very good. you get the speed of a 240pin DDR4 on only 40 pin...
    this means you can build systems with a lot more ram channels..

    so you have to admit that this is very good anti-obsolescence technology. and it really could revolutionise computer history.

    yes as you said if you buy a desktop system with it it could be more expensive at start but after 10 years you could save a lot of money.

    my TR 1920X i now bought 128gb ECC ram with 3200mhz... but my mainboard can handle 4000mhz ram

    but there is no DDR4 ECC ram with 4000mhz but they could build DDR5 ram with ECC at 4000mhz

    this means with open-CAPI i would get my 4000mhz ECC ram years later.

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    • #42
      Originally posted by Qaridarium View Post
      then it is true that you get more and more GB of ram for less and less money.
      Yes, that's a nice benefit. FWIW, over the life of my PCs (usually 5-10 years), I tend to upgrade storage, GPU, and RAM once. And for RAM, I typically double the original capacity.

      I am not arguing against OpenCAPI, in general. I just do not foresee it coming to the desktop. I guess we'll just wait and see if I'm right.

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      • #43
        Originally posted by coder View Post
        Yes, that's a nice benefit. FWIW, over the life of my PCs (usually 5-10 years), I tend to upgrade storage, GPU, and RAM once. And for RAM, I typically double the original capacity.
        I am not arguing against OpenCAPI, in general. I just do not foresee it coming to the desktop. I guess we'll just wait and see if I'm right.
        i had thoughts about this and i discovered a usercase what save you a lot of money in the long run.
        for example if your old pc has ddr4 and your new pc has ddr5 you need new ram this means 500-800€ for like 128gb...

        now imagine if your old system is OpenCAPI and the new one is also openCAPI

        then you can just use the old ram for the new system. an later if the ram prices go down you can upgrade it.

        this saves you a lot of money.

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        • #44
          Originally posted by Qaridarium View Post
          i had thoughts about this and i discovered a usercase what save you a lot of money in the long run.
          for example if your old pc has ddr4 and your new pc has ddr5 you need new ram this means 500-800€ for like 128gb...
          That sounds like a workstation use case, though. I have just 16 GBs in my PCs and it's plenty. At work, we use 32 GB and I never see it fully-utilized.

          For someone who needs lots and lots of memory, like server users or maybe even Threadripper Pro, I already agree that a more scalable memory system makes sense. Indeed, that's who they designed it for.

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          • #45
            Originally posted by coder View Post
            That sounds like a workstation use case, though. I have just 16 GBs in my PCs and it's plenty. At work, we use 32 GB and I never see it fully-utilized.
            For someone who needs lots and lots of memory, like server users or maybe even Threadripper Pro, I already agree that a more scalable memory system makes sense. Indeed, that's who they designed it for.
            not only threadripper pro ... i do have a threadripper 1920X and i do have 128gb ECC ram.- it is 700€
            if i switch to a DDR5 system i have to buy it again but with openCAPI i could use my old ram in my new system
            and i think to save 700€ on a system upgrade it is a huge impact.

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