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AMD Adding Experimental Video Mode Optimization To FreeSync

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  • AMD Adding Experimental Video Mode Optimization To FreeSync

    Phoronix: AMD Adding Experimental Video Mode Optimization To FreeSync

    At least under Linux AMD is currently working on a new and currently experimental video mode optimization for FreeSync...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...o-Optimization

  • #2
    Has there been any talk about enabling Freesync on HDMI under Linux, at least on the newer 6000-series cards?

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    • #3
      I'm completely lost as to what any of this means, but I see AMD + Linux + FreeSync and I feel happy. It seems like it's background making 2 modes: 60hz, and 60hz target freesync. so that the display can turn freesync on and off without blanking between?

      I still haven't gotten freesync working on linux because of multiple monitors. Everything I see says it should be running, but when i open my monitor OSD, it's locked at 144hz (and I know from windows that the OSD will report the current freesync hz when freesync is active and that this exact setup works with freesync otherwise).

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      • #4
        If you have a freesync monitor running at say 90Hz and you have video content you want to run at 60Hz or 48Hz, you can select the appropriate mode and when you do the modeset, it seemlessly changes to the new mode without causing any blanking or flickering that you would normally see when you do a full modeset. This makes it easy for applications to seamlessly set a mode with a refresh rate that matches the media timing for video playback.

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        • #5
          Nice. Now let's hope devs of mpv, totem, gstreamer, ffmpeg etc. notice this and implement this feature into their apps.

          This is probably not much benefit for those of us with 120/144hz monitors though because those sync up well with most common video framerates anyway, but 60hz Freesync displays will benefit from this, being able to seamlessly switch to 48hz to avoid 3:2 pull down and such.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by bisby View Post
            I'm completely lost as to what any of this means, but I see AMD + Linux + FreeSync and I feel happy. It seems like it's background making 2 modes: 60hz, and 60hz target freesync. so that the display can turn freesync on and off without blanking between?

            I still haven't gotten freesync working on linux because of multiple monitors. Everything I see says it should be running, but when i open my monitor OSD, it's locked at 144hz (and I know from windows that the OSD will report the current freesync hz when freesync is active and that this exact setup works with freesync otherwise).
            I'm on a multi-monitor setup and FreeSync has been working perfectly on both monitors for me on Xorg.

            Have you created an amdgpu conf file yet with "VariableRefresh" to on?

            Code:
            $ cat /usr/share/X11/xorg.conf.d/20-amdgpu.conf
            Section "Device"
                   Identifier "AMD"
                   Driver "amdgpu"
                   Option "TearFree" "on"
                   Option "VariableRefresh" "on"
            EndSection

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            • #7
              Originally posted by bisby View Post
              I still haven't gotten freesync working on linux because of multiple monitors. Everything I see says it should be running, but when i open my monitor OSD, it's locked at 144hz (and I know from windows that the OSD will report the current freesync hz when freesync is active and that this exact setup works with freesync otherwise).
              From what i heard, that should work, yes - unlike my setup with only one freesync monitor and one non-freesync unfortunately :/

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Brisse View Post
                Nice. Now let's hope devs of mpv, totem, gstreamer, ffmpeg etc. notice this and implement this feature into their apps.

                This is probably not much benefit for those of us with 120/144hz monitors though because those sync up well with most common video framerates anyway, but 60hz Freesync displays will benefit from this, being able to seamlessly switch to 48hz to avoid 3:2 pull down and such.
                In mpv and ffmpeg you've been able to use the fps filter to move film fps into a monitor's higher freesync range since freesync hit the market. A simple lua script does this matching automatically in mpv. The result is of course choppy like the source material.
                That's why mpv also offers interpolation, which drastically reduces judder ... and headaches.

                Otherwise your freesync monitor has to have a min->max frequency range that includes those film rates. And the patch doesn't change that.

                So if there's proper freesync support (at least for fullscreen applications) then you don't need to switch to those modes. That also circumvents the problem of player clock vs monitor clock drift that you get with a fixed refresh rate.

                So I don't see what's so great about this patch.

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                • #9
                  Anyone know what kernel these are meant for? I couldn't get it to patch cleanly on 5.10-rc7 or amd-staging-drm-next.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Brisse View Post
                    This is probably not much benefit for those of us with 120/144hz monitors though
                    I find that I get screen tearing with high refresh rates. Content with 23.98 fps or 29.97 or even 59.94 are the worst offenders.

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