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Radeon RX 6800 Series Performance Comes Out Even Faster With Newest Linux Code

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  • #81
    Originally posted by Etherman View Post
    ​​​​​Since stuff is in upstream, kernel, Xorg and Mesa, couldn't you just support minimum version of those instead?
    "minimum version required Linux x.x, Mesa x.x and Xorg x.x"​​​​​​
    Yes with the caveat that most distros will not have the minimum version of those components and most users are not comfortable building their own components.

    For 6800/XT the guidelines we provided were "5.9 stable kernel, 20.2 Mesa, LLVM 11" or "Ubuntu 20.10 + 5.9 stable kernel" but it's now looking like one important patch may have missed the 5.9 series and only gone into 5.10.
    Last edited by bridgman; 26 November 2020, 04:47 PM.

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    • #82
      Originally posted by duby229 View Post

      I mean if you use linux -at all- you should be on a rolling release distro. Every single component, every package, gets released on a rolling cycle. So called "stable" distro's aren't stable at all. If the -entire- concept of a so called "stable" distro was abandoned, there wouldn't be any need to backport anything at all.
      I'd feel pretty confident using a rolling release distro now, but when KDE Plasma first came out, it was pretty buggy. I tried a rolling release distro hoping that things would get fixed, but what wound up happening was different things broke every major release. Consistent bugs are preferable to having different ones every update. What I would be worried about now would be what new function that has worked flawlessly for 20 years was pulled into systemd for no good reason and isn't as reliable as what it replaced. That is easier to do with major releases every 6 months.

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      • #83
        Originally posted by BreezeDM View Post

        I'd feel pretty confident using a rolling release distro now, but when KDE Plasma first came out, it was pretty buggy. I tried a rolling release distro hoping that things would get fixed, but what wound up happening was different things broke every major release. Consistent bugs are preferable to having different ones every update. What I would be worried about now would be what new function that has worked flawlessly for 20 years was pulled into systemd for no good reason and isn't as reliable as what it replaced. That is easier to do with major releases every 6 months.
        I get the reasoning, but it's actually not true. Backporting, it ruins that reasoning. It costs far more than initial development and gets far less testing than initial development. You can't guarantee that backports didn't introduce new behavior.

        I'm a Gentoo user and OpenRC is very well supported thank goodness, so no systemd worries here. Also as a gentoo user I have the flexibility of use flags to remove unused features, which reduces the overhead where unwanted behavior can exist. Ever since quad cores became a thing, gentoo takes less than one day to build and configure, now-a-days on a Ryzen it takes 2-3 hours to build and a bit longer for configuration. It's definitely well worth it.
        Last edited by duby229; 27 November 2020, 05:32 PM.

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        • #84
          Originally posted by bridgman View Post
          Yeah, we were just discussing this internally re: launch time support for new products...

          Rolling release distros are the easiest to support via upstream - as long as you have working code upstream the distros will probably pick it up quickly.

          Enterprise distros almost always move too slowly for upstream-based support but are relatively easy to support with DKMS-based packaged drivers.

          Distros on a ~6 month release cycle actually turn out to be the hardest - they update quickly enough to make DKMS-based support a lot of work, but they still end up with code that is 3-12 months old on average. Of course the flip side is that a ~6 month release cycle gives a nice balance between stability and newness, which I guess helps with popularity.

          That said, when I looked in Steam's Linux stats I was surprised to see that Arch + Manjaro together had almost as much share as Ubuntu 20.04 (11%, 11%, 24%). It was also nice to see the RX480 as the most popular GPU in the list.
          Thanks for this explanation. Personally I have been flipping between the Ubuntu LTS and a 6month releases. Lately I have been staying on the LTS for longer just because I am getting too lazy to install fresh distro every 6 months.

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          • #85
            Originally posted by bridgman View Post
            Yes with the caveat that most distros will not have the minimum version of those components and most users are not comfortable building their own components.

            For 6800/XT the guidelines we provided were "5.9 stable kernel, 20.2 Mesa, LLVM 11" or "Ubuntu 20.10 + 5.9 stable kernel" but it's now looking like one important patch may have missed the 5.9 series and only gone into 5.10.
            Quick update on this... agd5f has pushed the missing patch to 5.9 stable, and 5.9.12 Ubuntu mainline builds are available, so anyone wanting to stick with a stable kernel while still getting new HW support is now covered by the (Ubuntu 20.10 + stable kernel 5.9.12) option.

            Support has also arrived in a number of rolling release distros; I'm told that Fedora 33 now has it as well although I'm not sure if we have tested that ourselves yet.

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