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AMD Delivers Many Fixes For Polaris GPUs On Linux - Finally Enables ZeroRPM Fan Mode

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  • atomsymbol
    replied
    Originally posted by microcode View Post
    I'm not so much a fan of ZeroRPM, I prefer a very quiet spinning fan to one that's spinning up and down from nothing.
    Just some notes:
    • Some GPUs have fans with bearings that are audible even at the lowest (non-zero) RPM
    • The default ZeroRPM temperature is too low. If the fan bearing is audible, I prefer 60℃.
    • A 120/140mm quiet fan installed in the front panel of a PC tower case can reduce ZeroRPM GPU temperature. In my experience, the GPU heatpipes are cooler by more than 5℃ compared to not having such a fan.

    Leave a comment:


  • M@GOid
    replied
    Originally posted by schmidtbag View Post
    Interesting. Well, the 580 is a good deal and despite the pandemic, gaming is getting more popular, so I guess it isn't too surprising that the 580 is getting more popular.

    That's weird you're getting parts that fail so easily... The only GPU I ever had that died on me was an Nvidia 7900 GTO, due to water damage. And even then, it still worked, as long as you didn't use up all of it's very-limited 256MB of VRAM. What temperatures are you typically getting on your GPUs? My 290 practically never exceeds 65C, though it is slightly undervolted.

    I've always been wary of gaming GPUs powered over PCIe. There really isn't much power they're able to feed from, especially if you have any other 12v devices attached to the motherboard. I say "gaming GPUs" because office GPUs don't demand as much power, or at least not extensively.
    I'm not aware of any situation where powering a GPU over PCIe has proven to be problematic, I'm just saying that if you care about longevity, that kind of setup is putting a lot of stress on the 24-pin ATX connector and the motherboard traces.

    Over the years I got to buy better PSUs and UPSs, to provide the best power source I can. As I said in another comment that got eaten by the forum filter, the building I live have old wiring and is in a place with lots of dust coming from outside, nothing I can do about it really. Also here is moderately hot, most of the year floating around 30°C/86F. I monitor temps constantly here, and the cards generally reach the seventies (C). My cases always have good ventilation.

    As I said in the other comment, I suspect is a combination of dust, hot, me manipulating the hardware inside the chassis from time to time for cleaning or getting bored with the case and changin it...

    Now I don't play AAA games anymore (at last launched recently), since is a endless parade of open worlds and infinite quests, or some random FPS with shiny graphics. Now I tend to prefer the innovation, riskier concepts of indie games. Plus AAA on Linux kinda died. So my needs for a beefy GPU disappeared. I considered going full APU, given my experience riding a old A8 7600, but reviews of the OEM only launched Renoir (that most big reviewers are surprisingly afraid to buy/touch), made me draw the line on discreet cards without external power, enough to play indie games. Depending on my impatience, I may consider a sub-$200 RDNA 2 with external power, but whatever happens, I will definitely ride the budget side of the PC Master Race®, for the immediate future.

    Leave a comment:


  • Tumm
    replied
    Despite the praised AMD drivers on Linux, I did have multiple problems with my RX 590. Any app going fullscreen appears to cause a crash after a few seconds, and my system freezes reliably after a few seconds of high load on the H265 hw encoder.

    Great that they are still working on it though. Hope they fixed these.

    Leave a comment:


  • schmidtbag
    replied
    Originally posted by [email protected] View Post
    I just looked at, that Amazon list is updated by the hour, so it represents today's trends.

    I wished my cards lasted as long as yours, because no matter what I do (energy wise), hardly they work more than 3 to 4 years. I also had a R9 290 (a 6950 before that). Then I jumped into a RX470 (sold to a friend, still works), them a RX570 (ITX, died months ago). So I was more or less in the same level of performance since 2013.

    Today, with the GPU high prices in my neck of the woods, and now my unwillingness in buying another $400 class card, I drew the line on cheap, PCI-E only powered cards. Since I could not stay on a mere A8 7600 APU for long, I took a RX 550 until AMD release another low powered, compact card and it became available here for a reasonable price, hopefully as soon as the beginning of the next year.
    Interesting. Well, the 580 is a good deal and despite the pandemic, gaming is getting more popular, so I guess it isn't too surprising that the 580 is getting more popular.

    That's weird you're getting parts that fail so easily... The only GPU I ever had that died on me was an Nvidia 7900 GTO, due to water damage. And even then, it still worked, as long as you didn't use up all of it's very-limited 256MB of VRAM. What temperatures are you typically getting on your GPUs? My 290 practically never exceeds 65C, though it is slightly undervolted.

    I've always been wary of gaming GPUs powered over PCIe. There really isn't much power they're able to feed from, especially if you have any other 12v devices attached to the motherboard. I say "gaming GPUs" because office GPUs don't demand as much power, or at least not extensively.
    I'm not aware of any situation where powering a GPU over PCIe has proven to be problematic, I'm just saying that if you care about longevity, that kind of setup is putting a lot of stress on the 24-pin ATX connector and the motherboard traces.

    Leave a comment:


  • microcode
    replied
    I'm not so much a fan of ZeroRPM, I prefer a very quiet spinning fan to one that's spinning up and down from nothing.

    Leave a comment:


  • Azpegath
    replied
    Originally posted by torsionbar28 View Post
    I wasn't familiar with that "best sellers" page before, thanks for sharing. Pretty telling on the CPU side. I knew Ryzen was selling really well, but to own the top 8 positions on the CPU sales chart, with intel's best seller way down at #9 is pretty amazing. It's a massacre really.
    https://www.amazon.com/Best-Sellers-...av_pc_4_284822
    And that's why I own AMD shares... Hopefully it will really show in their results in the coming years.

    Leave a comment:


  • xcom
    replied
    They also fixed the Poweplay issue with blank screen?

    Leave a comment:


  • M@GOid
    replied
    Originally posted by evil_core View Post

    Maybe it's related to crappy PSU?
    Nope. In the last 10 years I buy only PSU's with good reviews from Corsair or Seasonic, plus I have a nice UPS and it its nicely grounded.

    It must be the old wiring in the building I live, plus unhealthy amounts of dust (both I cannot do a thing about it), together with periodic hand manipulation of the card and other hardware inside the case.

    I also have a problem staying with the same case looking at me for too long, so I change it from time to time.

    Leave a comment:


  • atomsymbol
    replied
    Originally posted by Solid State Brain View Post
    ZeroRPM mode-at last. I ended up making my own script in Python to make it behave more like it does on Windows, with the fan smoothly changing with a time-averaged GPU temperature, but also turning off below a certain threshold. Other scripts use instant GPU temperature readings, which at least on my RX480, respond too quickly to sudden load.
    Same here, implemented in Go instead of Python (without time-averaged temperature, with an update interval of 2 seconds and with fan spin-down prevention for 60 seconds). The simple script (160 lines of Go code) is at least as reliable as fan tuning in Radeon Software in Windows 10.

    Leave a comment:


  • evil_core
    replied
    Originally posted by [email protected] View Post

    I just looked at, that Amazon list is updated by the hour, so it represents today's trends.

    I wished my cards lasted as long as yours, because no matter what I do (energy wise), hardly they work more than 3 to 4 years. I also had a R9 290 (a 6950 be
    Maybe it's related to crappy PSU?

    Leave a comment:

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