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AMD Has DP MST DSC Support Ready For The Linux 5.6 Kernel

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  • AMD Has DP MST DSC Support Ready For The Linux 5.6 Kernel

    Phoronix: AMD Has DP MST DSC Support Ready For The Linux 5.6 Kernel

    In addition to their AMDGPU/AMDKFD feature updates sent out on Thursday, AMD also sent in a special pull request to DRM-Next on its own of a new feature: DP MST DSC...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...5.6-DP-MST-DSC

  • #2
    Does this mean we can get 144hz 4k now?

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    • #3
      Looks like 5.6 will be huge for AMD users.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by wizard69 View Post
        Looks like 5.6 will be huge for AMD users.
        Yeah, I look forward to Fedora 32 which will have kernel 5.6 and the latest Mesa & GNOME stuff

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        • #5
          Originally posted by wizard69 View Post
          Looks like 5.6 will be huge for AMD users.
          Too bad it'll miss Ubuntu 20.04 LTS just by a bit =(

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          • #6
            Originally posted by lowlands View Post

            Yeah, I look forward to Fedora 32 which will have kernel 5.6 and the latest Mesa & GNOME stuff
            If you are using Arch Linux you have the latest stuff already.

            I'll show myself out.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by flashmozzg View Post

              Too bad it'll miss Ubuntu 20.04 LTS just by a bit =(
              Oh wait...one more thing. If you were using Arch Linux...okay okay I'll stop.

              In all seriousness, the concept of 'LTS' releases being stable is a fallacy. As a long time Linux user, I've actually had less issues with distros that regularly update. Be it Ubuntu non-LTS releases, or Arch Linux (which I use currently). As an example, Ubuntu 18.04 did not boot on my Threadripper system due to their choice of a kernel that had a CPU bug. A newer kernel was out (and you could download it via the terminal in rescue mode and install it), but they didn't update the release to fix the issue in the 9 or so months I used Ubuntu. Between that and other issues (bugs, crashes, tweaks that had to be made to get something working), I eventually moved on. My Arch desktop has been the most stable Linux install I've used.

              I imagine that when AppImage, Flatpak, and Snap become more widespread we will see very little need for the likes of Debian, Ubuntu, Fedora, etc.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by betam4x View Post

                Oh wait...one more thing. If you were using Arch Linux...okay okay I'll stop.

                In all seriousness, the concept of 'LTS' releases being stable is a fallacy. As a long time Linux user, I've actually had less issues with distros that regularly update. Be it Ubuntu non-LTS releases, or Arch Linux (which I use currently). As an example, Ubuntu 18.04 did not boot on my Threadripper system due to their choice of a kernel that had a CPU bug. A newer kernel was out (and you could download it via the terminal in rescue mode and install it), but they didn't update the release to fix the issue in the 9 or so months I used Ubuntu. Between that and other issues (bugs, crashes, tweaks that had to be made to get something working), I eventually moved on. My Arch desktop has been the most stable Linux install I've used.

                I imagine that when AppImage, Flatpak, and Snap become more widespread we will see very little need for the likes of Debian, Ubuntu, Fedora, etc.
                Truer words have never been said....

                So called "stable" distro's aren't stable at all, but are better described as "version locked". I say if they want to lock in on versions then let them fools have what they want.... They want old versions that have unfixed bugs, unfixed security flaws, unimplemented drivers, etc, then let them have their cake and eat it too...
                Last edited by duby229; 01-12-2020, 10:19 PM.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by betam4x View Post
                  I imagine that when AppImage, Flatpak, and Snap become more widespread we will see very little need for the likes of Debian, Ubuntu, Fedora, etc.
                  There will always be a need for a distro (in variable shape or form) since you need a basic system to install a Flatpak etc. on. Without a distro, what is going to provide the basic plumbing like a kernel, SELinux, firewall, startup scripts, etc? If you stick that into a Flatpak then you basically have created another distro :-)

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by duby229 View Post
                    So called "stable" distro's aren't stable at all, but are better described as "version locked". I say if they want to lock in on versions then let them fools have what they want.... They want old versions that have unfixed bugs, unfixed security flaws, unimplemented drivers, etc, then let them have their cake and eat it too...
                    Without those stable distros, enterprise software (ERP, CRM, LoB, payroll) would not have a platform to run on. I'd like to get paid so I'm happy that those "fools" can have their cake and eat it too

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