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Radeon Gallium3D Fixes Up 10-Bit HEVC Video Decode Support

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  • Radeon Gallium3D Fixes Up 10-Bit HEVC Video Decode Support

    Phoronix: Radeon Gallium3D Fixes Up 10-Bit HEVC Video Decode Support

    Hitting Mesa 20.0-devel a short time ago were a set of patches to the Radeon Gallium3D video code for fixing 10-bit HEVC video decode support...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...-Bit-HEVC-P010

  • #2
    When will they support setting the encode speed?

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    • #3
      P016 uses 16 bit per channel and P010 uses 10 bit [1], I wonder if it means worse quality or anything at all.


      [1] https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/win...-video-formats

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      • #4
        AMD should finally fix/implement VAAPI deinterlacing, opening videos with VAAPI deinterlacing (be it in VLC or mpv) still instantly crashes the driver.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by aufkrawall View Post
          AMD should finally fix/implement VAAPI deinterlacing, opening videos with VAAPI deinterlacing (be it in VLC or mpv) still instantly crashes the driver.
          That would be nice.

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          • #6
            The same developer also finally fixed H.264 decode : https://gitlab.freedesktop.org/mesa/mesa/issues/1193

            That was opened by me, there were 2 other duplicate issues opened by others who also did the same investigation and complained about the same problem.

            After ignoring the fact that their VAAPI implementation was broken, they finally fixed it.

            Edit: One of the other issues opened: https://gitlab.freedesktop.org/mesa/mesa/issues/1428
            Last edited by sandy8925; 01-04-2020, 06:14 AM.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by cl333r View Post
              P016 uses 16 bit per channel and P010 uses 10 bit [1], I wonder if it means worse quality or anything at all.


              [1] https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/win...-video-formats
              On the display side most (cheaper) monitors you will find are 8bit, 10 bit per channel is becoming a lot more common. 12bpc is still in the realm of professional monitors and $$$

              So most people will not notice any difference.

              Where you *might* notice a difference would be taking a 12bpc image through at 10pbc pipeline to be displayed on a 12bpc monitor.

              This is besides the fact that lossy compression throws away a bunch of information at the encode stage, so no matter how good your decode pipeline, it'll never be perfect.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by boxie View Post
                So most people will not notice any difference.
                Between 8bit and 10bit or 10bit and 12bit. because for 8 to 10 you can see it clear. currently dithering is used to mask this.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by boxie View Post
                  On the display side most (cheaper) monitors you will find are 8bit
                  actually they are 6 bit with temporal dithering

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Nille View Post

                    Between 8bit and 10bit or 10bit and 12bit. because for 8 to 10 you can see it clear. currently dithering is used to mask this.
                    for 8->10 you will notice a difference In some places... banding in gradients being the most obvious place.

                    for 10->12bpc I have no idea what you would see (if anything in normal day to day usage). I know those professional monitors come with hoods, so maybe you need to control more of the environment to notice things?

                    Unfortunately there currently appears to be a tradeoff in the monitor world between 10bpc and freesync, although the situation is becoming better!

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