Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

AMD Announces Radeon Open Compute ROCm 3.0

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • AMD Announces Radeon Open Compute ROCm 3.0

    Phoronix: AMD Announces Radeon Open Compute ROCm 3.0

    AMD just sent out their press release for SuperComputing 19 week in Denver. It turns out being released for SC19 is the latest major iteration of Radeon Open Compute, ROCm 3.0...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...-3.0-Announced

  • #2
    I have two questions:
    Is still insanely difficult to install it on a current distribution like Kubuntu 19.10 ?

    Last time I was forced to install Kubuntu 18.04 -> Install ROCm -> Upgrade to Kubuntu 19.04 -> Upgrade to Kubuntu 19.10
    All these steps because I wanted to install ROCm on Kubuntu 19.10 and it refused because it was not Kubuntu 18.04.
    This is the crappiest installation of any software I have ever seen. I hope they improved that.

    Any improvements for for mining performance ?

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by Danny3 View Post
      I have two questions:
      Is still insanely difficult to install it on a current distribution like Kubuntu 19.10 ?

      Last time I was forced to install Kubuntu 18.04 -> Install ROCm -> Upgrade to Kubuntu 19.04 -> Upgrade to Kubuntu 19.10
      All these steps because I wanted to install ROCm on Kubuntu 19.10 and it refused because it was not Kubuntu 18.04.
      This is the crappiest installation of any software I have ever seen. I hope they improved that.

      Any improvements for for mining performance ?
      was it the rocm packages that refused install themselves?

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by boxie View Post

        was it the rocm packages that refused install themselves?
        Yes, the installation failed with some "Unsupported distribution", I don't remember the exact error message.
        I don't remember how I found out also that 18.04 is supported, maybe it was a hint after the above error message or I read it on the internet.
        But I think they intentionally put some code to do some matching with the distro that you're using without any option to continue anyway.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Danny3 View Post
          I have two questions:
          Is still insanely difficult to install it on a current distribution like Kubuntu 19.10 ?

          Last time I was forced to install Kubuntu 18.04 -> Install ROCm -> Upgrade to Kubuntu 19.04 -> Upgrade to Kubuntu 19.10
          All these steps because I wanted to install ROCm on Kubuntu 19.10 and it refused because it was not Kubuntu 18.04.
          This is the crappiest installation of any software I have ever seen. I hope they improved that.
          In my experience with ROCm the simplest way is a docker-based:
          • Install only kernel-related rocm packages on a host machine (compute-firmware rock-dkms packages as far as I remember)
          • Run one of the official rocm docker images as privileged container
            Code:
            docker run --privileged

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Danny3 View Post
            Yes, the installation failed with some "Unsupported distribution", I don't remember the exact error message.
            I don't remember how I found out also that 18.04 is supported, maybe it was a hint after the above error message or I read it on the internet.
            But I think they intentionally put some code to do some matching with the distro that you're using without any option to continue anyway.
            I guess their focus on supporting LTS might have some misguided packaging efforts.
            (rocm works find on KDE Neon FWIW - being LTS based and all)

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Danny3 View Post
              I have two questions:
              Is still insanely difficult to install it on a current distribution like Kubuntu 19.10 ?

              Last time I was forced to install Kubuntu 18.04 -> Install ROCm -> Upgrade to Kubuntu 19.04 -> Upgrade to Kubuntu 19.10
              All these steps because I wanted to install ROCm on Kubuntu 19.10 and it refused because it was not Kubuntu 18.04.
              This is the crappiest installation of any software I have ever seen. I hope they improved that.

              Any improvements for for mining performance ?
              I've found that whenever something is difficult to get installed because of some stupid artificial limiter, using the pkgbuilds from Arch Linux's AUR can be a big help to figure out workarounds (since Arch typically is never supported by closed-source software):
              https://aur.archlinux.org/cgit/aur.g...opencl-runtime

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by schmidtbag View Post
                I've found that whenever something is difficult to get installed because of some stupid artificial limiter, using the pkgbuilds from Arch Linux's AUR can be a big help to figure out workarounds (since Arch typically is never supported by closed-source software):
                https://aur.archlinux.org/cgit/aur.g...opencl-runtime
                I prefer the Windows way: plug stuff in, detect it, install drivers and make stuff work.
                What you have just described is horrible by comparison.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Danny3 View Post
                  Yes, the installation failed with some "Unsupported distribution", I don't remember the exact error message.
                  I don't remember how I found out also that 18.04 is supported, maybe it was a hint after the above error message or I read it on the internet.
                  But I think they intentionally put some code to do some matching with the distro that you're using without any option to continue anyway.
                  To be fair, CUDA is just slightly better; its installer won't stop you from continuing, but it's very likely you will have to stop due to incompatibility with newer gcc or newer kernel.
                  So I usually stayed with CentOS for GPU computing.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by bug77 View Post
                    I prefer the Windows way: plug stuff in, detect it, install drivers and make stuff work.
                    In Windows it is somewhat harder to tell whether a file is superfluous because it does not belong to any package. This may lead to extra files piling up in the filesystem over time.

                    In Linux (Gentoo) for example:

                    Code:
                    $ qfile /usr/lib64/libamdocl64.so
                    dev-libs/rocm-opencl-runtime-2.9.0: /usr/lib64/libamdocl64.so

                    Comment

                    Working...
                    X