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AMD "Trusted Memory Zone" Encrypted vRAM Support Coming To Their Linux GPU Driver

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  • AMD "Trusted Memory Zone" Encrypted vRAM Support Coming To Their Linux GPU Driver

    Phoronix: AMD "Trusted Memory Zone" Encrypted vRAM Support Coming To Their Linux GPU Driver

    AMD Trusted Memory Zone support is a new feature being worked on for their open-source graphics driver that works in conjunction with the graphics hardware for being able to encrypt portions of the video memory...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...ed-Memory-Zone

  • SystemCrasher
    replied
    Originally posted by starshipeleven View Post
    As said by me and others, this is important for GPU virtualization (i.e. use a single GPU for multiple VMs), as this keeps each VM's graphic stuff separate and does not allow another VM to snoop it.
    I do not get how vRAM encryption could help virtualization on its own. It rather work for something like "reverse-MMU" (GPU-side MMU) + IOMMU that would remember who is memory region owner and thwart undesired accesses (eventually letting hypervisor to kick in and fake things, pretending there was no HW exception - like it happens with paging & cpu side memory accesses right now).

    Ironically that wish brings us to point where we rather want some "compute accelerator" that is more like "CPU" and "computer", preferrably running Linux and shareable some more sane ways (like e.g. high-speed networking, that could be separated much better than memory, if desired). I think closest I've seen is like Xeon Phi. But alas, its Intel, so one can expect unreasonable pricing - which jeopardizes whole point. Seems intel still haven't learned from their Itanium fail.
    Last edited by SystemCrasher; 09-20-2019, 03:16 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • starshipeleven
    replied
    Originally posted by sandy8925 View Post
    Even if it's for DRM purposes, will it result in Widevine finally enabling hardware video decode for DRM'd media in browsers, on both Windows and Linux? It's idiotic and ridiculous that they refuse to use hardware video decode for Widevine streams on browsers.
    Can't speak for Windows, but it's highly unlikely that Linux will never see true DRM support because you could just modify the kernel to spoof all that garbage.

    Maybe a Windows VM with virtualized GPU (in the future when it becomes a feature in consumer hardware)?

    Leave a comment:


  • tildearrow
    replied
    Originally posted by starshipeleven View Post
    It is not what you wrote though. Please try to understand us, we only read what you write on the post.
    OK, will do. Editing my original post to clarify.

    Leave a comment:


  • Luke
    replied
    Originally posted by starshipeleven View Post
    You didn't purchase a copy. You purchased the license to listen to it from the copy (or specific hardware storage medium aka cd/dvd/whatever).
    That attitude is why I stopped buying music: I will not spend a cent for any ownership other than full "sovereign" ownership. I have not purchased a single music CD since the start of the (now stopped due to this response) filesharing lawsuits and have never once purchased any media online at all, nor will I ever do so. Creative Commons, pirate, or I will write and play it myself.

    Leave a comment:


  • sandy8925
    replied
    Even if it's for DRM purposes, will it result in Widevine finally enabling hardware video decode for DRM'd media in browsers, on both Windows and Linux? It's idiotic and ridiculous that they refuse to use hardware video decode for Widevine streams on browsers.

    For example, my brother's laptop with an older and weak AMD APU supports H.264 decoding, but Chrome won't use HW acceleration for sites like Prime Video and Hotstar.

    Leave a comment:


  • starshipeleven
    replied
    Originally posted by tildearrow View Post

    This. is. what. I. meant.
    It is not what you wrote though. Please try to understand us, we only read what you write on the post.

    Leave a comment:


  • starshipeleven
    replied
    Originally posted by SystemCrasher View Post
    Uhm yea, and I can imagine how "features" like this could be used, so I'm tempted to call such features as bugs and backdoors, it seems to describe what it does much better.
    As said by me and others, this is important for GPU virtualization (i.e. use a single GPU for multiple VMs), as this keeps each VM's graphic stuff separate and does not allow another VM to snoop it.

    Leave a comment:


  • tildearrow
    replied
    Originally posted by starshipeleven View Post
    You didn't purchase a copy. You purchased the license to listen to it from the copy (or specific hardware storage medium aka cd/dvd/whatever).
    This. is. what. I. meant.

    Leave a comment:


  • SystemCrasher
    replied
    Originally posted by starshipeleven View Post
    This is software support of a hardware feature. You can always patch away software support of stuff that you don't want.
    Uhm yea, and I can imagine how "features" like this could be used, so I'm tempted to call such features as bugs and backdoors, it seems to describe what it does much better.

    Leave a comment:

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