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AMD "Trusted Memory Zone" Encrypted vRAM Support Coming To Their Linux GPU Driver

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  • #11
    Originally posted by [email protected] View Post

    Is not yours, you merely licensed it.
    And I refuse to pay anything for such licenses, aside from maybe the $0.01 per view it's worth (for music, thankfully DRM-free CDs and public radio exist).

    I'll pay significant cash for a true owned (in the sense a paper book is owned) movie or audio CD. I have a nice collection of audio CDs bought straight from retail because of this, but movies I only pay a small amount of pocket change for third hand copies of the DRM restricted media (and don't pay for streaming anything, period -- either that comes completely from the data analytics and ads that are collected anyway or I don't watch/listen.).

    And yeah, this AMD "feature" is just another restriction in a long line of them. It's why I compute with POWER9, not Epyc, and why and am looking to replace my AMD GPUs with something less restricted as soon as I can.

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    • #12
      Originally posted by sandy8925 View Post
      AndyChow - It's for DRM (Digital Restrictions Management). Your own data won't be protected, don't worry.
      That's probably one application. Other applications would be protecting an apps memory in the context of "cloud computing".

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      • #13
        Originally posted by AndyChow View Post
        I'm all for more encryption and don't see anything wrong with this, but it leaves me scratching my head. What use could this have? What are they trying to protect?
        it's used by applications that want to keep their vRAM secret or untouchable from other applications.

        DRM is one potential application. GPU sharing between VMs is another big one. You don't want VMs to be able to snoop in another VM's stuff even if you are sharing the GPU (with the GPU virtualization hardware that exists in server cards)
        Last edited by starshipeleven; 09-12-2019, 06:59 AM.

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        • #14
          Originally posted by tildearrow View Post

          Once again, I repeat, I did not mean "it is mine". I only purchased it, so "a copy of it is mine".
          You didn't purchase a copy. You purchased the license to listen to it from the copy (or specific hardware storage medium aka cd/dvd/whatever).

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          • #15
            Originally posted by starshipeleven View Post
            You didn't purchase a copy. You purchased the license to listen to it from the copy (or specific hardware storage medium aka cd/dvd/whatever).
            Originally posted by tildearrow View Post

            Once again, I repeat, I did not mean "it is mine". I only purchased it, so "a copy of it is mine".
            Exactly. And to add to that, that copy is for your personal listening only. Take that CD and use it on your little business with a public space (barber shop, dry cleaning, etc) and you will hear from (insert your country's music association) what they think about your definition of "mine".
            Last edited by [email protected]; 09-12-2019, 08:43 AM.

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            • #16
              Seems AMD becomes more and more serious about fucking up those who buys their hardware for the real. They even managed to be creative enough to try that semi-opensource ways, whoa. Whole new level of treachery: "...but you have a choice: you can patch out our nasty shit away"? Oh, that's really new formula of evil

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              • #17
                Originally posted by SystemCrasher View Post
                Seems AMD becomes more and more serious about fucking up those who buys their hardware for the real. They even managed to be creative enough to try that semi-opensource ways, whoa. Whole new level of treachery: "...but you have a choice: you can patch out our nasty shit away"? Oh, that's really new formula of evil
                This is software support of a hardware feature. You can always patch away software support of stuff that you don't want.

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                • #18
                  Originally posted by tildearrow View Post
                  I wish DRM would die. I want to listen to my purchased music, not be filled with this crap.
                  Congrats, you merely paid for some non-exclusive right to blah-doh-some-obscure terms. Surely very common way to feel self goofied, though scale of effect is such that I'm tempted to call it fraud on authors side: they clearly fail to explain terms and it starts looking like fraud, where ppl think they pay for something that almost like "ownership" but rather get some obscure blah-doh-something-murky-terms instead.

                  Though reading copyright laws helps a bit: basically it states you have no rights to use intellectual property unless author declared otherwise in some license. If you don't have license - hmm, that's formally piracy, yarrrr!
                  Last edited by SystemCrasher; 09-12-2019, 12:09 PM.

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                  • #19
                    Originally posted by starshipeleven View Post
                    This is software support of a hardware feature. You can always patch away software support of stuff that you don't want.
                    Uhm yea, and I can imagine how "features" like this could be used, so I'm tempted to call such features as bugs and backdoors, it seems to describe what it does much better.

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                    • #20
                      Originally posted by starshipeleven View Post
                      You didn't purchase a copy. You purchased the license to listen to it from the copy (or specific hardware storage medium aka cd/dvd/whatever).
                      This. is. what. I. meant.

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