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AMD Is Aiming For Radeon RX 5700 "Navi" Support In Linux 5.3 + Mesa 19.2

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  • #11
    Originally posted by bridgman View Post

    You could call it a hybrid but not in that sense... we used to talk about GCN as an ISA, but it seems that most people outside AMD think of GCN as a micro-architecture instead (ie an implementation of the ISA). RDNA is GCN ISA but not what you think of as GCN architecture.
    With ISA you mean Instruction Set Architecture?
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Instru...t_architecture

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    • #12
      Originally posted by bridgman View Post

      You could call it a hybrid but not in that sense... we used to talk about GCN as an ISA, but it seems that most people outside AMD think of GCN as a micro-architecture instead (ie an implementation of the ISA). RDNA is GCN ISA but not what you think of as GCN architecture.
      Can you delve into this a bit deeper? There's very little actual information about Navi.

      Originally posted by Nille_kungen View Post
      With ISA you mean Instruction Set Architecture?
      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Instru...t_architecture
      Yes though this term is primarily used in conjunction with CPU micro architectures like x86, ARM, MIPS, etc.

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      • #13
        Originally posted by Nille_kungen View Post
        With ISA you mean Instruction Set Architecture?
        Right... programming model would be another term.

        R3xx-R5xx was separate PS/VS with vector+scalar instructions, R6xx was unified shader VLIW SIMD, GCN is unified shader SIMD+scalar.

        There seemed to be a lot of confusion between ISA and architecture, leading to unintentional forum comments that in the CPU world would translate to something like "Ryzen is never going to be much better than an 8086 because they are both x86".

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        • #14
          Originally posted by birdie View Post
          Can you delve into this a bit deeper? There's very little actual information about Navi.
          Sorry, but not yet. I think the next level of detail will come out around E3.

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          • #15
            Originally posted by bridgman View Post

            You could call it a hybrid but not in that sense... we used to talk about GCN as an ISA, but it seems that most people outside AMD think of GCN as a micro-architecture instead (ie an implementation of the ISA). RDNA is GCN ISA but not what you think of as GCN architecture.
            bridgman
            For comparing architectures is the new Navi (RDNA; incl. future APU) fully capable of 8k resolution (i.e. @60 Hz via one cable, i.e. DP 1.4 and HDMI 2.1) or is it still chipset limited as Raven Ridge?
            Maybe this is to early to get an answer for but I think it's striking not to get maximum resolution information for old Raven Ridge - so I had to ask a PC manufacturer (or have I missed anything?).

            Maybe you can answer if the AMD driver stack is capable of 8k right now - or if this had to be enhanced/implemented after Navi support had been achieved?
            I just ask as it was reported that Intel extended stack for Icelake to support 4k+ (not giving information if this means only 5k or full 8k) - but for both GPUs those most interesting details (maybe not for gamers - but for other use cases at least - like desktop publishing, photographers etc.) are not given.

            Any hint about the situation, i.e. the AMD status concerning 8k support via HW and SW stack, would be very welcome - and personally this is my `must buy' argument. Otherwise I would have bought a Raven Ridge system long ago.

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            • #16
              Thanks for all the useful input!

              Originally posted by wizard69 View Post
              As for waiting for 2020 why bother? Seriously in 2020 you will be waiting for what comes in 2021. Even if hardware ray tracing come sin 2020 software will not be fully exploiting it for some time possibly into 2021.
              No, I don't. C'mon, I run a Phenom II partnered with a Radeon 7950.
              I'm *trying* to a make not-too-stupid-decision and stay with it many years.
              That worked out tremendously good with the hardware above.
              I can play DOOM and Wolfenstein II with Vulkan in FullHD and it's indeed smooth as butter.

              Originally posted by wizard69 View Post
              Besides that if you are woriried abotu PS5 just buy a playstaion when it comes out.
              I got it. You think mentioning the PS5 is stupid.
              The idea is that many games in the upcoming years are designed with exactly that spec in mind.
              It can't be bad for PC gamers to have a similar architecture (at least GPU).
              I think the 7950 is quite close to what the PS4 and XBox One has.
              That might one reason why games still work nice (read: not awful, sometimes quite good) on my rig.

              That's the strategy I'm after again.
              It might not work out, though.

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              • #17
                Originally posted by JMB9 View Post

                bridgman
                For comparing architectures is the new Navi (RDNA; incl. future APU) fully capable of 8k resolution (i.e. @60 Hz via one cable, i.e. DP 1.4 and HDMI 2.1) or is it still chipset limited as Raven Ridge?
                Maybe this is to early to get an answer for but I think it's striking not to get maximum resolution information for old Raven Ridge - so I had to ask a PC manufacturer (or have I missed anything?).

                Maybe you can answer if the AMD driver stack is capable of 8k right now - or if this had to be enhanced/implemented after Navi support had been achieved?
                I just ask as it was reported that Intel extended stack for Icelake to support 4k+ (not giving information if this means only 5k or full 8k) - but for both GPUs those most interesting details (maybe not for gamers - but for other use cases at least - like desktop publishing, photographers etc.) are not given.

                Any hint about the situation, i.e. the AMD status concerning 8k support via HW and SW stack, would be very welcome - and personally this is my `must buy' argument. Otherwise I would have bought a Raven Ridge system long ago.
                The only thing i seen about Intel gen11 graphics and 8K is that the media engine supports 8K.
                Intel's new media engine looks interesting on paper.

                Comment


                • #18
                  Originally posted by entropy View Post
                  Thanks for all the useful input!
                  One investment though which made quite an impact for me was a decent FreeSync monitor. I use one of the cheaper Freesync-over-HDMI models with 72 Hz from Samsung which lacks LFC support but has low input lag. Probably a fancy 144 Hz display with LFC and Displayport would be even better. But I have to say that the Windows gaming experience with a Polaris card got already way better than before and price/performance wise this was really hard to beat (I got both really cheap on sale and couldn't resist). A couple of months earlier I had also invested in a 6-Core-Westmere-Xeon for my aging X58 platform and 24 GB of DDR3 RAM. That combination is still good for a couple of years of gaming (which usually don't mandate AVX, at least not yet). Best long term value platform I've ever had.

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                  • #19
                    bridgman can we get in the future a GUI?

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                    • #20
                      Originally posted by bridgman View Post
                      There seemed to be a lot of confusion between ISA and architecture, leading to unintentional forum comments that in the CPU world would translate to something like "Ryzen is never going to be much better than an 8086 because they are both x86".
                      Except that Ryzen is not really x86, but AMD64 + lots of extensions (e.g. AVX), which is arguably a quite different ISA as well...

                      I always found the commitment to the GCN ISA interesting, and wonder how long you are going to stick to it. With the history of rapidly changing GPU architectures and ISAs, it is impressive if you manage to pull of some sort of standardization at GPU ISA level that is both efficient and sustainable (with extensions of course)! I would guess RT will require some additions

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