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Radeon Software Adrenalin 2019 Rolls Out While Linux Users Should Have AMDGPU-PRO 18.50

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  • #11
    Originally posted by debianxfce View Post
    RX590 needs the latest AMD wip kernel and 0 or 1 patches. Plus firmware updates.
    Absolutely! Somehow I saw 590 and thought 580, thanks for correcting me.

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    • #12
      Originally posted by Baguy View Post
      This is great news, however on my RX 560 4G OC anything newer than mesa 18.0 runs like utter crap... all kinds of artifacts and tearing, leaving it basically impossible to use my system. (in particular KDE). Switched to AMD for a better experience, and honestly, i think the crap i had to deal with on my old nvidia card was better than this.
      Regressions happens, bisecting helps

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      • #13
        Originally posted by theriddick View Post
        You can't use amdgpu and radeonsi at same time, that makes no sense, lol. You tell xorg to load one or the other.

        AMDGPU is not AMDGPU-PRO, there is also the in development amdgpu-dc drivers.
        (I don't care about case sensitivity for the sake of naming something, lets not be case nazi's)
        One slight correction... you can't use amdgpu and radeon (not radeonsi) at the same time. The combination of amdgpu (kernel driver), amdgpu or modesetting (X driver) and Mesa/radeonsi is probably the most commonly used driver set.

        I am not aware of any separate amdgpu-dc driver - dc is just the modern display part of the amdgpu driver. On pre-Vega chips we also have the older non-DC paths in the driver as backup but I imagine they will go away at some point.
        Last edited by bridgman; 12-14-2018, 12:53 PM.

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        • #14
          Seriously? Is this all that AMD has been able to do for the whole year?
          Neither the new roadmap, nor the AMDVLK community development, nor the Radeon Settings panel...

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          • #15
            Originally posted by Baguy View Post
            This is great news, however on my RX 560 4G OC anything newer than mesa 18.0 runs like utter crap... all kinds of artifacts and tearing, leaving it basically impossible to use my system. (in particular KDE). Switched to AMD for a better experience, and honestly, i think the crap i had to deal with on my old nvidia card was better than this.
            No problems with dual monitors (1 x HDMI / 1 x DVI => VGA) on MSI 4GB RX 560 under Manjaro XFCE with linux-hardened

            MSI rx 570 8GB passed through to Win10 via displayport also very good

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            • #16
              Originally posted by [email protected] View Post

              robertpartridge , you have a few options:

              * The "all-open" stack: radeonsi and radv
              * The "all-closed" stack: AMDGPU-PRO
              * Some hybrid of the two
              Thanks for helping to explain. I just want to clarify a couple of things. There is no "all-closed" stack, hasn't been since fglrx. Since our 17.50 release of AMDGPU-PRO, it includes both All-Open and Pro variants. (Yes, the terminology is confusing.) This is documented here and in the documentation included in the tarball.

              Originally posted by [email protected] View Post
              I would advise you to update to the most recent kernel and mesa you can (padoka ppa if using ubuntu, and maybe Linux 4.19.x) before installing your GPU. First, go with the all-open stack, and see if you have some specific needs that the proprietary driver can provide.
              The padoka ppa is a great resource but not everyone wants to risk upgrading so many components, esp. conservative LTS/enterprise users. Our packaged releases should be a great resource for them. The All-Open variant typically provides newer hardware support and and newer Mesa than what is shipped by LTS/enterprise distros. The Pro variant replaces Mesa OpenGL with closed source OpenGL, necessary for some proprietary workstation applications, and adds (closed source) Vulkan and OpenCL. It's also possible to mix and match, e.g. to add OpenCL to the otherwise All-Open variant. We also package (open source) AMDVLK but don't install it by default. We don't package RADV currently.

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              • #17
                Originally posted by mphuZ View Post
                Seriously? Is this all that AMD has been able to do for the whole year?
                Neither the new roadmap, nor the AMDVLK community development, nor the Radeon Settings panel...
                I don't understand comments like this. There are hundreds of articles at Phoronix about our open source contributions and driver releases throughout the year. The All-Open variant included in our AMDGPU-PRO packaged releases is built from the same source code as upstream, only packaged with a dkms module for convenient installation on LTS/enterprise Linux. AMDVLK is included, in addition to (closed source) AMDVLK PRO. Our packaged releases are necessary for some workstation users who require workstation features but you don't have to use them. We hope the All-Open variant is convenient for some All-Open users but there is nothing wrong with using Linux distro provided packages or the padoka ppa. Build from source, if you like, whatever floats your boat.

                By all means, criticize sparse release notes. That's a legitimate complaint I can raise with management. But don't mistake sparse release notes for a lack of progress.

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                • #18
                  I see that 18.50 has been released. Does anyone know ... does it actually have the RX 590 patches?

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                  • #19
                    Originally posted by twriter View Post

                    I don't understand comments like this. There are hundreds of articles at Phoronix about our open source contributions and driver releases throughout the year. The All-Open variant included in our AMDGPU-PRO packaged releases is built from the same source code as upstream, only packaged with a dkms module for convenient installation on LTS/enterprise Linux. AMDVLK is included, in addition to (closed source) AMDVLK PRO. Our packaged releases are necessary for some workstation users who require workstation features but you don't have to use them. We hope the All-Open variant is convenient for some All-Open users but there is nothing wrong with using Linux distro provided packages or the padoka ppa. Build from source, if you like, whatever floats your boat.

                    By all means, criticize sparse release notes. That's a legitimate complaint I can raise with management. But don't mistake sparse release notes for a lack of progress.
                    I'm not talking about rare notes and progress during the year. All this is in the Windows drivers. But at the end of the year, AMD has recently tried to show something new for its users (like AMDVLK at the end of last year) on all platforms, as well as in the area of ​​computing.

                    This year I expected AMD to talk about a new way to contribute to the AMDVLK driver, which will become easier and better.

                    It is worth considering that ROCm 2.0 is still not released - can something be told about Linux during this release? Last year, AMDVLK was told just a week after the Adrenalin Edition was released.

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                    • #20
                      Originally posted by mphuZ View Post
                      But at the end of the year, AMD has recently tried to show something new for its users (like AMDVLK at the end of last year) on all platforms, as well as in the area of ​​computing. This year I expected AMD to talk about a new way to contribute to the AMDVLK driver, which will become easier and better.
                      Ahh, OK... you're seeing the pattern of releasing cool stuff at the end of the year and interpreting it as policy... I don't think there is any plan or convention about releasing fun/interesting things at year end, it just works out that way some times.

                      Goodies from the open source team often happen at year end because the devs are on vacation and so have time to work on fun stuff, but that doesn't necessarily scale across the entire company.

                      There is ongoing discussion & work happening re: Vulkan and development models but I don't expect anything new by year end.

                      Originally posted by mphuZ View Post
                      It is worth considering that ROCm 2.0 is still not released - can something be told about Linux during this release?
                      ROCm 2.0 is not scheduled for release yet (although very close) so IMO the fact that it has not been released yet is not worth considering.

                      It will be Linux-only again though AFAIK.

                      Originally posted by mphuZ View Post
                      Last year, AMDVLK was told just a week after the Adrenalin Edition was released.
                      I believe that was coincidence again, not a regular pattern.
                      Last edited by bridgman; 12-15-2018, 02:52 PM.

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