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  • tg--
    replied
    I recently replaced my loud HD7970 for a shiny new Vega 56 (now that the prices finally reached the recommended price...).
    No issues at all with amdgpu/radeonsi, performance is absolutely fine, and the open source drivers are just so hassle-free these days.

    Great job AMD, and great job marek and all the other contributors!

    Leave a comment:


  • duby229
    replied
    OT: I know this is off topic....

    But I just wanted to say this. Thank you AMD for making these great drivers open source. And they are now distributed via -PACKAGE MANAGEMENT-,,,,,

    Leave a comment:


  • beniwtv
    replied
    Originally posted by skeevy420 View Post

    For the past 6 years, I haven't had to worry about what distro I ran, only what versions of packages a distro had. Distros that were modern and new enough to fully work with AMDGPU have always just worked for me. I've never once had HDMI audio issues, which apparently is a common problem, and I have to run it with CIK because my R7 260x isn't technically supported.

    For the past 4 years, Linux games have worked for the most part (that's the same comment I'd make for my Windows experience in that same time frame).

    2 years...Damn near all my Windows games worked. Most needed hacks, custom Wine builds, etc, and it wasn't the easiest to maintain.

    Now...All my Windows games work on Linux except for PuBG. Steam Proton and Lutris, especially Lutris, really help. Some still need hacks and what not, but easy-to-use clients make it "click, click, play game" just like on any other OS. I quit dualbooting after 20 years last April when I realized I had only booted up Windows every 6 or 8 months for the past 10 years just to make sure it was updated.

    That's mainly thanks to AMD. Steam. Antergos, Lutris, DXVK, and so many others I can't even think to name right now have helped too....but this is about AMD and what they've done.
    I can only second skeevy420. In my case, 6 years ago I was using an Intel+AMD hybrid laptop, and for the games we could play at that time, already worked. I was able to play Star Trek Online on that in Wine. Then I got an RX 480 8GB on launch day, with a new PC build and it's been smooth 2-3 months after the card was released. Before that I had to use the propietary AMDGPU driver, which worked, but wasn't as performant.

    Leave a comment:


  • wizard69
    replied
    I don’t see it as sarcasm though after reading this thread I can see how the comments could look that way.

    I dropped out of the Linux world around 2008 because of driver issues and really shitty distro stability. Nine years latter I decided to get back into the fold after Apple screwed up a MBP repair. Well the repair plus the fact that Apple new Laptops don’t fit my needs.

    Even on bleeding edge hardware my are my experience with Linux is many times better. I have to credit AMD and Intel for that. Overcoming the driver issue was a massive step forward or Linux. Now if only ARM would wise up and open its drivers.

    Leave a comment:


  • skeevy420
    replied
    Originally posted by nanonyme View Post

    I remember those days too, that is precisely why I was being confused. "Linux has been so nice and easy to maintain and play games on regardless of distribution or setup." seems like an overstatement to me still. I guess it's more or less true for fully opensource games though, granted. There's still tons of games though which are not included here.
    For the past 6 years, I haven't had to worry about what distro I ran, only what versions of packages a distro had. Distros that were modern and new enough to fully work with AMDGPU have always just worked for me. I've never once had HDMI audio issues, which apparently is a common problem, and I have to run it with CIK because my R7 260x isn't technically supported.

    For the past 4 years, Linux games have worked for the most part (that's the same comment I'd make for my Windows experience in that same time frame).

    2 years...Damn near all my Windows games worked. Most needed hacks, custom Wine builds, etc, and it wasn't the easiest to maintain.

    Now...All my Windows games work on Linux except for PuBG. Steam Proton and Lutris, especially Lutris, really help. Some still need hacks and what not, but easy-to-use clients make it "click, click, play game" just like on any other OS. I quit dualbooting after 20 years last April when I realized I had only booted up Windows every 6 or 8 months for the past 10 years just to make sure it was updated.

    That's mainly thanks to AMD. Steam. Antergos, Lutris, DXVK, and so many others I can't even think to name right now have helped too....but this is about AMD and what they've done.

    Leave a comment:


  • skeevy420
    replied
    Originally posted by nanonyme View Post

    I'm confused since this sounds very sarcastic and Marek's contributions are definitely a good thing
    There's no sarcasm at all. I've used Linux for the past 20 years with primarily Nvidia & AMD GPUs. I used to worry whenever Xorg, the kernel, Mesa, Catalyst, Nvidia blob, etc needed an update because that meant something might break and I'll have to pin something to an old version, hope a kind soul hosted a custom repository, have to use an inferior free driver, or some other fix until it all worked again.

    These days I anticipate getting updates for all the things that used to make me worry; because ever since AMD opened up their driver and I switched to it, my Linux experience has been phenomenal and it somehow still gets better. All of that is thanks to AMD and their Linux developers and all the people who contribute code, file bug reports, etc.

    Leave a comment:


  • starshipeleven
    replied
    Originally posted by nanonyme View Post

    I remember those days too, that is precisely why I was being confused. "Linux has been so nice and easy to maintain and play games on regardless of distribution or setup." seems like an overstatement to me still. I guess it's more or less true for fully opensource games though, granted. There's still tons of games though which are not included here.
    I guess it depends from where your clock starts.

    Linux now is MASSIVELY easier to maintain and play games on in most self-respecting distros if you compare it to like 10 years ago.

    It still compares unfavourably with PC and consoles, but if you were used to Linux 10 years ago the current situation is still basically a 180 flip on that.

    Leave a comment:


  • chrisr
    replied
    We are light years away from where we were with FGLRX. And Good Riddance!.

    May it rot in pieces.

    Nowadays we have a stable, up-to-date and performant driver shipping with the kernel itself. And ditto (c/kernel/X/) for the X drivers too.

    Leave a comment:


  • nanonyme
    replied
    Originally posted by chrisr View Post

    I don't think it's sarcasm. I think skeevy420 might just be remembering the days when everyone needed to use the old FGLRX driver.
    I remember those days too, that is precisely why I was being confused. "Linux has been so nice and easy to maintain and play games on regardless of distribution or setup." seems like an overstatement to me still. I guess it's more or less true for fully opensource games though, granted. There's still tons of games though which are not included here.

    Leave a comment:


  • FastCode
    replied
    I remember novideo days vividly.
    Having to use auditory response in form of 'aplay /true.wav' or 'aplay /false.wav' for command results until you either install networking/ssh or install kernel x.y.z.a.b.g.without_virtualbox_support.without_sup port_for_my_wifi.rc28/xorg/nvidia blindly.
    I also hate SONY for this. but I hate nvidia more and Linus couldn't express my feeling any better than he did with the finger.

    Leave a comment:

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