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Is there any kernel on which Raven Ridge CPUs are stable?

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  • Is there any kernel on which Raven Ridge CPUs are stable?

    I've recently started running Manjaro Linux on a Raven Ridge laptop (with Ryzen 2700U and Radeon RX 560 - Acer Nitro 5 to be exact) but no matter what kernel I've tried, I'm still getting freezes on a regular basis. I've tried Ubuntu as well (both Bionic Beaver and Cosmic Cuttlefish) and they both fared the same.

    I haven't tried the latest mainline kernels (the 4.19s and 4.20s) but I've updated daily to the latest release on Manjaro (which currently means 4.18.6) and it's still freezing from time to time.

    Is there anything in the pipeline (4.19/4.20) that has solved these issues?

    Also, on top of the stability problems, I've been encountering problems with the power management on Raven Ridge. The first time I boot, all the cores are set to 399MHz although the base clock of 2700U is 2.2 GHz. The only way to get it to run at its nominal frequency is to do a soft reboot. Unless I do a soft reboot, there was nothing I could find that would make it at anything but 399MHz. Also, if I unplug it, it also goes down to 399MHz and stays there until I do a soft reboot. Is there any kernel option that needs to be activated to sort this out or is it a known and still unsolved issue? This too has happened both on Manjaro and on all the Ubuntu versions I've tried.

  • #2
    The desktop Raven Ridge CPUs are stable under 4.18/4.19 at least under Debian Testing and MATE with MESA from git (or Debian Experimental). But your laptop has 2 GPUs so that complicates matters.

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    • #3
      I remember reading somewhere about the kernel 4.19 and MESA 18.2 being the combination necessary for stability on mobile Raven Ridge devices. What you're saying confirms that. I guess I'll have to wait a bit more, because I'm not willing to mess with MESA from git on a production device. As it works right now, I can afford a few rather infrequent freezes per week.

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      • #4
        It is a known issue and a lot has been written about it:
        https://bugzilla.kernel.org/show_bug.cgi?id=196683

        Known workarounds are disabling C6 power state, or rcu_nocbs=... kernel parameter.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by chithanh View Post
          It is a known issue and a lot has been written about it:
          https://bugzilla.kernel.org/show_bug.cgi?id=196683

          Known workarounds are disabling C6 power state, or rcu_nocbs=... kernel parameter.
          Yes, that's it! I had forgoten where I read about it. Unfortunately, for me at least, disabling the C6 power state and using rcu_nocbs didn't make any difference.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by skuphundaku View Post

            Yes, that's it! I had forgoten where I read about it. Unfortunately, for me at least, disabling the C6 power state and using rcu_nocbs didn't make any difference.
            Check that your kernel enables RCU_NOCB_CPU. Otherwise command line parameter does not work.

            To prevent random kernel lock ups with Ryzen, enable RCU_NOCB_CPU and boot the kernel with the rcu_nocbs=0-X command line parameter. X is the cpu thread count -1.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by debianxfce View Post

              Check that your kernel enables RCU_NOCB_CPU. Otherwise command line parameter does not work.

              To prevent random kernel lock ups with Ryzen, enable RCU_NOCB_CPU and boot the kernel with the rcu_nocbs=0-X command line parameter. X is the cpu thread count -1.
              I double checked and RCU_NOCB_CPU is built into my kernel. I added rcu_nocbs=0-7 and now I'll have to wait and see if it keeps freezing or not.

              Does anyone have any idea what's the reason for the throttling I encounter the first time I boot that I was mentioning in the original post?

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              • #8
                Originally posted by skuphundaku View Post
                Does anyone have any idea what's the reason for the throttling I encounter the first time I boot that I was mentioning in the original post?

                You can try my distribution by installing it to a usb stick, it has latest everything: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fKJ-IatUfis

                If that works, then you need the AMD drm-next-4.20-wip kernel to Manjaro or use my distribution. I would like to know how my distribution works with laptops. I have removed a lot of device drivers and some driver can be missing for a laptop.
                Last edited by debianxfce; 09-14-2018, 05:51 AM.

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