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NVIDIA 381.09 Linux Beta Driver Released: New Kernel Support, Updated Vulkan

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  • #11
    Originally posted by engmia View Post
    What does "support for 4.10 kernel" mean? I'm currently running kernel 4.10 with the older version drivers and haven't noticed any problems yet.
    Because all older versions are needing patches, otherwise they won't compile against 4.10.

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    • #12
      Well, I hope this fixes issues I'm having with PRIME on a friends laptop. Everything works until I switch to the Intel GPU, and then try to switch back to the Nvidia GPU. After that the computer will no longer boot and I have to go into recovery mode and purge the Nvidia drivers. If I can't figure out how to get it to work in the next day or so I'm going to have to give up and reinstall Windows 10, which is really going to make me look bad since I finally convinced them to switch to Linux

      After all my prodding, and showing them games running under Wine, they were so impressed they were willing to give it a try, and I'm really surprised that so far the Intel/Nvidia GPU combination doesn't work at all. The hybrid system is a really good power saving idea for laptops. Oh well. At least it makes me feel a little better about my AMD driver problems. I was going to go out and get an Nvidia card but I guess right now nothing is working correctly.

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      • #13
        Originally posted by muncrief View Post
        Nvidia drivers. If I can't figure out how to get it to work in the next day or so I'm going to have to give up and reinstall Windows 10, which is really going to make me look bad since I finally convinced them to switch to Linux
        Try some older driver version (in year 2016) from the archive.
        http://www.nvidia.com/object/linux-a...y-archive.html

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        • #14
          Originally posted by debianxfce View Post

          Try some older driver version (in year 2016) from the archive.
          http://www.nvidia.com/object/linux-a...y-archive.html
          Thank you for your help, I was finally able to get the driver to work. However I then unfortunately discovered that all Nvidia drivers have a screen tearing problem that renders them useless, and the problem is known and has no remedy. So unfortunately not only was my friends patience at an end, but I also had to admit that Linux simply wasn't a viable alternative at this time. It's really a shame that the Linux video driver infrastructure was destroyed before a viable replacement was ready. For now I'm going to have to stop trying to convert friends and clients from Windows to Linux because neither Nvidia or AMD have drivers suitable for end users. Hopefully things will be different in a few years and I can begin the drive again.

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          • #15
            Originally posted by muncrief View Post

            Thank you for your help, I was finally able to get the driver to work. However I then unfortunately discovered that all Nvidia drivers have a screen tearing problem that renders them useless, and the problem is known and has no remedy. So unfortunately not only was my friends patience at an end, but I also had to admit that Linux simply wasn't a viable alternative at this time. It's really a shame that the Linux video driver infrastructure was destroyed before a viable replacement was ready. For now I'm going to have to stop trying to convert friends and clients from Windows to Linux because neither Nvidia or AMD have drivers suitable for end users. Hopefully things will be different in a few years and I can begin the drive again.
            It is easier to maintain a Linux computer than a win virushoover computer. In linux you have clear log file system. In win virus hoover you have black and blue screens and it takes hours to solve problems that is already solved in Debian like software dependency problems. Desktop tearing can be caused by the desktop, I use desktop compositing with Xfce to prevent window tearing when moving a window fast. The Nvidia linux driver does have many xorg options that you can try. It only takes a bit time to learn new things that same you had when you started using win virus hoover.

            A friend of my kid has a laptop with 970M and it is working fine with Solus Linux. I am sure that If I bought a laptop with A12-9700P, Amd open source drivers would work well. In a desktop computer there is no problems using Amd open source driver or Nv closed source driver. Only that it is easier to use the open source driver, it might work out of the box. My wife uses the Nouveau driver with GT8400 and my kid plays Steam games with Debian testing Xfce and GTX750ti. My kid fed up using win7 and win10.
            Last edited by debianxfce; 06-12-2017, 03:32 AM.

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            • #16
              Originally posted by debianxfce View Post

              It is easier to maintain a Linux computer than a win virushoover computer. In linux you have clear log file system. In win virus hoover you have black and blue screens and it takes hours to solve problems that is already solved in Debian like software dependency problems. Desktop tearing can be caused by the desktop, I use desktop compositing with Xfce to prevent window tearing when moving a window fast. The Nvidia linux driver does have many xorg options that you can try. It only takes a bit time to learn new things that same you had when you started using win virus hoover.

              A friend of my kid has a laptop with 970M and it is working fine with Solus Linux. I am sure that If I bought a laptop with A12-9700P, Amd open source drivers would work well. In a desktop computer there is no problems using Amd open source driver or Nv closed source driver. Only that it is easier to use the open source driver, it might work out of the box. My wife uses the Nouveau driver with GT8400 and my kid plays Steam games with Debian testing Xfce and GTX750ti. My kid fed up using win7 and win10.
              I've been running Linux since the mid 1990s off and on, and currently use Xubuntu 16.04 as my primary desktop. I'm also a hardware/firmware/software designer with over three decades of experience, most of that as an embedded systems engineer. I'm intimately familiar with Linux and appreciate both its strengths and its weaknesses, and am honest about both. In fact I had incredible difficulty even getting my very expensive Sapphire R9 390 to work, and was only able to do so by specifically using kernel 4.9 with patched AMDGPU-PRO 16.50 drivers. Nothing else provides the OpenGL 4.5 compatibility mode I need, and any drivers after 16.50 cause complete graphics corruption when playing games.

              The laptop in question was a Core I5 system with a discrete 940M GPU using PRIME. The screen tearing problems are well known and considered unfixable at this time, but I spent three days trying anyway just on that problem, and six days on the computer in total. However I found there was indeed no cure and the owner of the laptop needed his brand new computer, so I had to put Windows 10 back on it even though I despise Windows. And yes, I was running Xubuntu which is the XFCE desktop version of Ubuntu.

              The unfortunate truth is that manufacturers and the Linux development community made an egregious error by abandoning the previous driver architecture and infrastructure before a new one was ready. Of course replacing X and the overall driver architecture is essential and necessary, resources are limited, and it may be that there was no other recourse. However it's not clear to me that it was, but it is what it is.

              What's especially regrettable is that the previous driver architecture was abandoned at a time when Linux had one of the best chances to advance on the desktop in its history. People were disenchanted with Windows 10, and Steam was making a very public effort with Steam Machines to push Linux as had never been done before. But as it stands now Steam Machines have failed and Linux on the desktop is stagnating again, though hopefully it will still get up to 3% of the desktop market this year.

              These are the simple facts, stripped of as much emotion as possible, and it does no one any good to deny or hide from them. I am confident that Linux will one day reign supreme in the desktop market just as Android does the mobile market because it is technically superior to Windows, and Apple is too expensive with an ecosystem that is sparse, locked down, and cloistered. In fact Windows 10 is such a behemothly slow and inefficient botnet that when I showed my friend his laptop running it he was greatly disappointed at how slow it was compared to Linux. But the bottom line was he needed to play his games, he's invested a considerable amount of money in them, and that just wasn't possible with Linux at this time.

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              • #17
                Originally posted by muncrief View Post
                difficulty even getting my very expensive Sapphire R9 390 to work, and was only able to do so by specifically using kernel 4.9 with patched AMDGPU-PRO 16.50 drivers. Nothing else provides the OpenGL 4.5 compatibility mode I need, and any drivers after 16.50 cause complete graphics corruption when playing games.
                Amd open source driver is in OpenGL 4.5.
                Code:
                glxinfo | grep OpenGL
                OpenGL vendor string: X.Org
                OpenGL renderer string: Gallium 0.4 on AMD Radeon RX 460 Graphics (DRM 3.17.0 / 4.12.0-rc1+, LLVM 4.0.1)
                OpenGL core profile version string: 4.5 (Core Profile) Mesa 17.2.0-devel
                Originally posted by muncrief View Post
                And yes, I was running Xubuntu which is the XFCE desktop version of Ubuntu.
                Xubuntu does not have Xfce, it is canonical shitty tweaked desktop. For Prime you might need intel and nv drivers that match. There are plenty of other distributions to try. I would use Debian testing, Manjaro etc rolling release distributions that have fresh kernels for the intel gpu. And nv drivers from the nv site, not distro packaged because they are difficult to remove and are not tested.

                Originally posted by muncrief View Post

                What's especially regrettable is that the previous driver architecture was abandoned at a time when Linux had one of the best chances to advance on the desktop in its history.
                I have no clue what you are writing about, because current graphics architecture with X works fine with our Amd, Nv and Intel gpus.

                Windows graphics drivers are shit, we did install win10 drivers for 750ti and win10 and got black screen. It took 3 hours to roll back to win8.1 drivers that worked earlier.

                In a 2 year old intel celeron laptop, the intel windows driver can not render Sims 3 landscape, it is black. With Debian testing Xfce and wine-staging, Sims 3 runs fine. Cities Skylines does run faster in Debian than in win10.

                Originally posted by muncrief View Post
                But the bottom line was he needed to play his games, he's invested a considerable amount of money in them, and that just wasn't possible with Linux at this time.
                The kid with 970M laptop build a desktop gaming pc. His old gaming laptop is just for learning Solus Linux. They do not game with laptops at the professional level, so all gamers should use desktops instead of portable non standard toys.

                My kid has 13 native Linux games in the Steam list, average price 20 usd per game. Used a lot of money to Assasin Creeds that do not work with wine-staging. He just do not care those old games anymore.
                Last edited by debianxfce; 06-12-2017, 12:47 PM.

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                • #18
                  The open source OpenGL core profile is 4.5, the compatibility profile is 3.3, and unfortunately there are no plans to change it. Many games and programs look at the compatibility profile, for example Steam itself, and one of the current game favorites No Man's Sky. There are environment variables you can set for the open source drivers to make them claim OpenGL 4.5 compatibility mode, but they've never made them work for anything I've tried.

                  As for your comment about Xubuntu XFCE, it's XFCE. I use the distro with the most support because others have proven to be no better, and in the end have equivalent levels of problems.

                  And though I prefer desktops, many people use their laptops for gaming. That's just the way it is. Urging them to get desktops so they can run Linux is not going to advance Linux adoption.

                  I'm glad the systems and people you've encountered don't have problems with Linux. However I offer free Linux installation and setup for anyone who asks, and about half can't run it because they do have problems. There are a few that just don't like it, but I have a custom XFCE theme that's quite beautiful, and my own custom script called Wine Manager that enables the installation of unlimited bottles with clean, organized, hierarchical menus and custom environments so "just not liking it" usually isn't a problem.

                  By the way, I of course know about PlayOnLinux but I've found it to be a mess, and my script works much better. It's nowhere near as easy though, and you need to know how to patch, compile, and install various wine versions and set up custom environment variables.

                  I've invested quite a bit of time and effort over the years trying to switch people from Windows to Linux, but have to hold off for those who require gaming now because over the last year it's simply been too much time wasted, primarily because of the current video driver disarray. I understand that you disagree, and that's fine. However reality is reality, and it doesn't change simply because we wish it to be different, or think everyone should adopt some different way of doing things. If we are to advance Linux on the desktop it needs to work within that reality because the vast base of Windows users are not going to change their systems and practices just for us.

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                  • #19
                    Originally posted by muncrief View Post
                    The open source OpenGL core profile is 4.5, the compatibility profile is 3.3, and unfortunately there are no plans to change it. Many games and programs look at the compatibility profile, for example Steam itself, and one of the current game favorites No Man's Sky. There are environment variables you can set for the open source drivers to make them claim OpenGL 4.5 compatibility mode, but they've never made them work for anything I've tried.

                    My Steam client does not show any errors nor 5 native linux games. No Mans Sky is a windows game and it seems to work with wine-staging, see:
                    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MX2ELUy-Cv4

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                    • #20
                      The video you posted is from a year ago, and No Man's Sky did work perfectly then. Unfortunately the game has since changed to require OpenGL 4.5 compatibility mode and doesn't work without it now, so the open source drivers no longer work.

                      And you won't see any errors in Steam as it doesn't require OpenGL 4.5 compatibility mode. I was just pointing out that Steam looks at the compatibility profile, not the core profile.

                      By the way I'm talking about Steam under wine, and I use the latest wine staging with special patches to make it work even better than the pre-packaged version. If you look up Arch Linux wine staging you can find the patches I'm talking about and use the PKGBUILD file as a template for using them under Ubuntu.

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