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NVIDIA's Releasing An Overclocking Linux Driver Tomorrow

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  • NVIDIA's Releasing An Overclocking Linux Driver Tomorrow

    Phoronix: NVIDIA's Releasing An Overclocking Linux Driver Tomorrow

    At long last NVIDIA is expected to release a new binary Linux driver tomorrow that will support GPU overclocking for the GeForce 400 series hardware and newer (Fermi, Kepler, and Maxwell, inclusive). This first NVIDIA 337 series Linux driver release will also bring other new features...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=MTY1NzE

  • dimko
    replied
    yes and no

    Originally posted by Espionage724 View Post
    I'm not complaining or anything (just surprised), but was overclocking really not available at all with NVIDIA prior to this driver on Linux?
    It was avaialble for a while.
    Than drivers lost ability for overclock for a few years.
    And now ability is back!

    Leave a comment:


  • Espionage724
    replied
    I'm not complaining or anything (just surprised), but was overclocking really not available at all with NVIDIA prior to this driver on Linux? I know Catalyst receives it's fair share of flak, but it's had official overclocking support for a good while now...

    Leave a comment:


  • ageha
    replied
    I guess it's out...

    Leave a comment:


  • MNKyDeth
    replied
    It will be interesting to see if they allow you to go above the 250w thresh hold they set for all of their modern cards.

    I own a GTX 780 and I could max out all the volts and then find the highest clock frequencies until the card locked up the computer. The problem is sometimes the volts being set to high would cause the lock ups or freezing. This is because once you hit the 250w draw on the card it throttles or sometimes misbehaves.

    There are a few bios's out there that unlock the true potential of the 780's and I am sure the 770's and such. 1.212v is max voltage that is safe on air. If you use water to cool your card you don't really have to worry about the chip or ram, it's the power phase's that are going to have the issue. Keeping them cool is the key to large overclocks on 780's.

    Problem is, I doubt the OC'ing features will enable us to disable the watt thresh hold. I also doubt they will allow us to up the voltage. If they do allow us to up the voltage I doubt they will allow us to go over 1.212v.

    I play games on windows, but I enjoy Linux for most everything else.

    Zotac GTX 780 AMP! stock is 1006 core / 6208 mem

    With modded bios from Skynet and MSI Afterburner overclocking tool.
    Running at 1.375v + LLC mod = 1.4v water cooled temps are around 30c idle 36c full load.
    GTX 780 @ 1333 core / 7200 mem 24/7 as I don't shut my computer off.

    If we were to get these types of tools available in Linux, oh hell yeah!
    Last edited by MNKyDeth; 04-08-2014, 10:41 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • TheSoulz
    replied
    Originally posted by peppercats View Post
    The windows version of this release reduced directX overhead by a lot, did anything similar happen for openGL on linux?
    People are seeing 20-100%+ speed ups with the new driver on windows.
    no clue, dont think the linux driver was released yet.

    Leave a comment:


  • peppercats
    replied
    The windows version of this release reduced directX overhead by a lot, did anything similar happen for openGL on linux?
    People are seeing 20-100%+ speed ups with the new driver on windows.

    Leave a comment:


  • TheSoulz
    replied
    Still waiting for this driver...
    the windows one has been released

    Leave a comment:


  • Calinou
    replied
    Originally posted by efikkan View Post
    Why would you want to use FXAA? FXAA is post-processing AA which decreases picture quality by adding a blur.
    Sometimes, it's the only AA that can be used without losing too much FPS.

    Originally posted by efikkan View Post
    Sensible users who are not driven by ideology will use the official drivers, unless doing some special experimentation. Nouveau is in no fashion comparable to the official driver.
    People who don't do 3D (yes, these do exist, for various reasons) can use Nouveau fine, if it's stable. Please don't be insulting.

    Leave a comment:


  • Veerappan
    replied
    Originally posted by dimko View Post
    Define majority...
    Most people can live with stock opensource nuvea or whatever its called drivers. So why bother improving binary for them?
    THose who want to play games will install binary and most likely will want overclocking... At the end of day, people who dont care about things like gaming and overclocking will most likely end up with Intel onboard GPU or Noveua anyways.
    I'd argue that Overclocking is a small potential sub-set of users of the Nvidia Blob in Linux/BSD camp. In my case I was using Nouveau on my laptop (13" MBP with GF9400m), but repeatable hard-locks forced me back to the blob. I don't want to overclock that machine at all (laptop + overclock = hot lap and bad battery life), but I do like to play some games on it. If anything, I'd be more likely to underclock the chip with the binary driver to increase battery life.

    My desktop at home has Windows 7 and Ubuntu 14.04 Beta with a Radeon 7850. I game on it all the time (using Catalyst in Win7 and radeonsi in Linux), but I've never overclocked it.

    For most users, the additional gain in performance is not worth the hassle of setting up and performing stability testing for the few extra FPS you get. Add in additional power draw and noise and it's less worth it. This is also all assuming that the user even knows how to adjust the video/memory clock settings in the first place.

    Leave a comment:

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