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NVIDIA's Releasing An Overclocking Linux Driver Tomorrow

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  • #21
    Who cares? It's a useful feature. If you don't like it, don't use it. I doubt it took them days to implement it, it was probably for political reasons Linux didn't get it any earlier.

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    • #22
      All right thank you

      No problem now, compile without error

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      • #23
        hands off

        Originally posted by GreatEmerald View Post
        Not really. I'm never going to risk voiding my warranty just to get a few extra frames, and I think that will be true for most people at any point in time. It's like with smartphone hacking, most people will always use it vanilla (and unlocking the phone has much larger benefits than a few frames to begin with).
        GTX660 user here, outside of warranty. TY, but no, TY. I take my overclocking.

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        • #24
          Originally posted by mike4 View Post
          Hopefully we can now use AA together with FXAA, for Flightgear etc. like on Windows.
          Why would you want to use FXAA? FXAA is post-processing AA which decreases picture quality by adding a blur.

          Originally posted by birdie View Post
          What's there to play? Metro Last Light?

          NVIDIA should help nouveau more, not implement features required by 1% of Linux users (i.e. 0.01% computers users in general).
          Most of you guys still don't know the professional graphics and computing market is large for Nvidia on Linux and BSD, which is why Nvidia for years prioritize workstation oriented features. This is the reason why overclocking and until recently application profiles has been put on hold.

          Sensible users who are not driven by ideology will use the official drivers, unless doing some special experimentation. Nouveau is in no fashion comparable to the official driver.

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          • #25
            Originally posted by dimko View Post
            GTX660 user here, outside of warranty. TY, but no, TY. I take my overclocking.
            What part of "overclocking has its uses, but it won't be used by the majority of people" do you people not understand?

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            • #26
              Originally posted by GreatEmerald View Post
              What part of "overclocking has its uses, but it won't be used by the majority of people" do you people not understand?
              Define majority...
              Most people can live with stock opensource nuvea or whatever its called drivers. So why bother improving binary for them?
              THose who want to play games will install binary and most likely will want overclocking... At the end of day, people who dont care about things like gaming and overclocking will most likely end up with Intel onboard GPU or Noveua anyways.

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              • #27
                Originally posted by dimko View Post
                Define majority...
                Most people can live with stock opensource nuvea or whatever its called drivers. So why bother improving binary for them?
                THose who want to play games will install binary and most likely will want overclocking... At the end of day, people who dont care about things like gaming and overclocking will most likely end up with Intel onboard GPU or Noveua anyways.
                I'd argue that Overclocking is a small potential sub-set of users of the Nvidia Blob in Linux/BSD camp. In my case I was using Nouveau on my laptop (13" MBP with GF9400m), but repeatable hard-locks forced me back to the blob. I don't want to overclock that machine at all (laptop + overclock = hot lap and bad battery life), but I do like to play some games on it. If anything, I'd be more likely to underclock the chip with the binary driver to increase battery life.

                My desktop at home has Windows 7 and Ubuntu 14.04 Beta with a Radeon 7850. I game on it all the time (using Catalyst in Win7 and radeonsi in Linux), but I've never overclocked it.

                For most users, the additional gain in performance is not worth the hassle of setting up and performing stability testing for the few extra FPS you get. Add in additional power draw and noise and it's less worth it. This is also all assuming that the user even knows how to adjust the video/memory clock settings in the first place.

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                • #28
                  Originally posted by efikkan View Post
                  Why would you want to use FXAA? FXAA is post-processing AA which decreases picture quality by adding a blur.
                  Sometimes, it's the only AA that can be used without losing too much FPS.

                  Originally posted by efikkan View Post
                  Sensible users who are not driven by ideology will use the official drivers, unless doing some special experimentation. Nouveau is in no fashion comparable to the official driver.
                  People who don't do 3D (yes, these do exist, for various reasons) can use Nouveau fine, if it's stable. Please don't be insulting.

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                  • #29
                    Still waiting for this driver...
                    the windows one has been released

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                    • #30
                      The windows version of this release reduced directX overhead by a lot, did anything similar happen for openGL on linux?
                      People are seeing 20-100%+ speed ups with the new driver on windows.

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