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NVIDIA Publishes Code For X Synchronization Fences

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  • phoronix
    started a topic NVIDIA Publishes Code For X Synchronization Fences

    NVIDIA Publishes Code For X Synchronization Fences

    Phoronix: NVIDIA Publishes Code For X Synchronization Fences

    While NVIDIA may not release specifications for the GPU hardware or support any open-source drivers for their graphics processors after dropping their open-source X.Org driver, they do contribute a bit to the development of the X.Org Server. NVIDIA engineers like Aaron Plattner have contributed various patches and fixes against the server in the past and for features like VDPAU for DRI2. This afternoon there's a big patch-set coming out of NVIDIA that touches several X components. This set of patches adds support for X Synchronization Fences...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=ODM3Ng

  • mugginz
    replied
    Originally posted by val-gaav View Post
    Nope it is not ready yet. I'll be sure to try it in the future though as I will have no choice and have to upgrade due to other software...
    I tried my PCI TNT2 but it was dead so had to go looking for my AGP one which I finally found.

    Installed it into a PIII based 1.2GHz Celeron with 512M. Installed Ubuntu 10.04 and updated it. I left it running the card with Nouveau and ran some stuff.

    Desktop was @ 1024x768

    Web browsing is fine. Flash based advertisements are displayed correctly and at a descent rate.

    Flash based Youtube was watchable when windows but not when fullscreen. Even my 5870 in a quad core box is far from perfect with Flash video playback though.

    Some Flash games were OK and some sucked.

    Video playback was surprisingly good in some cases.
    DVD type video was completely find both windowed and fullscreen as was ogg-theora. mp4 video at 1280x566 was painfully slow. Probably more to do with the CPU than anything else though.

    Open Arena even at 640x480 was too slow to play but you could kind of get the idea what was going on.
    Some of the OpenGL Screen savers were fine like GLMatrix and such but others were a bit choppy.

    Graphically simpler games were fine.

    As far as word-processing and general desktop stuff goes it was completely usable. I'd rate Nouveau as good to go for a productivity desktop but not ready for GL games, at least not with a TNT2.

    What was it you were wanting to run with your card?

    Leave a comment:


  • yotambien
    replied
    All right, it's just that I never wrote that, and you quoted it as if I did. It doesn't matter, but for a moment I was confused and had to actually check whether I have a personality disorder when I type stuff.

    Anyway, if we trust Wikipedia, there are over a million computer viruses out there, and by 2006 there were about 63 of them for MacOS. I didn't find any updated figures, but I think that's very, very good, even if you take into account the ratio between market share numbers.

    Leave a comment:


  • kraftman
    replied
    Originally posted by yotambien View Post
    Wait a second, where did you take that yummy from? What are you quoting? Just curious.
    You said "Big iron, uh : D" and I was flaming with somebody for quite a long about this, so yummy means here something like - this taste great.

    Leave a comment:


  • yotambien
    replied
    Originally posted by kraftman View Post
    Big iron, uh? : D
    Yummy. So, what you're saying is that because the source is open, any improvements to it are a consequence of this opennes. This is question-begging. You could make an identical argument for anything else.

    Yummy. Openess, license and development model can have some influence on this, but same openess guarantee nothing in this case.
    Wait a second, where did you take that yummy from? What are you quoting? Just curious.

    Leave a comment:


  • kraftman
    replied
    Originally posted by V!NCENT View Post
    Yet it is. Linux is free of charge and freely redistributable without a single catch.

    That said the more companies use it come to rely on it. All these companies with different interests and markets made Linux so versitile that it runs on literaly everything from watches to super computers.

    Sure Windows can 'scale'/waste resources on super computers, but can Windows 7 run on your watch? There you go...
    Just a note. I was talking about different scallability. And you're probably right about this.

    Btw. Windows and OS X doesn't scale. Notice when some new hardware (multicore CPU) appears there are benchmars made on Linux and Windows, but the result is higher on Linux.

    Leave a comment:


  • kraftman
    replied
    Originally posted by yotambien View Post
    How does a secure and closed system such as MacOS fit in here? Either security is a function of opennes or it is not (or not in a first order manner).
    OS X is not a secure system in any way... (mainly thanks to its closed parts like Safari). Where did you hear such thing? :P Being open helps in catching and fixing bugs and vulnerabilities.

    But this one is bogus. Working out of the box is enabled by the existence of functional device drivers, which, although some claim Linux has the widest support for general hardware out there, I can't believe it is the case for general consumer hardware.
    I think they're talking about 'own made support', so excluding third party drivers.

    As for software, not only there is less of it compared to Windows, but I thoght we agreed that most of Linux programs can also be used outside it. Seriously, of all things, I can't think of a worse example as saying that Linux 'works out of the box'.
    It usually does (Linux+'own made support') while Windows usually does not (Windows - third party drivers doesn't run as much hardware as Linux).


    Big iron, uh? : D
    Yummy. So, what you're saying is that because the source is open, any improvements to it are a consequence of this opennes. This is question-begging. You could make an identical argument for anything else.
    Yummy. Openess, license and development model can have some influence on this, but same openess guarantee nothing in this case.

    Leave a comment:


  • val-gaav
    replied
    Originally posted by mugginz View Post
    Did you try Nouveau?
    Nope it is not ready yet. I'll be sure to try it in the future though as I will have no choice and have to upgrade due to other software...

    Leave a comment:


  • V!NCENT
    replied
    Originally posted by yotambien View Post
    I believe that some other closed source OSs are scalable, so it can't be down to the license, can it? In any case, perhaps I don't know enough about the details of the case you are mentioning.
    Yet it is. Linux is free of charge and freely redistributable without a single catch.

    That said the more companies use it come to rely on it. All these companies with different interests and markets made Linux so versitile that it runs on literaly everything from watches to super computers.

    Sure Windows can 'scale'/waste resources on super computers, but can Windows 7 run on your watch? There you go...

    Leave a comment:


  • yotambien
    replied
    OK, then take everything that doesn't apply apart. But then, I'm still left with the feeling that your argument is begging the question. This is, Linux is open, therefore any contribution to it comes about because its openness. I know you didn't say any, but I guess you have to justify what makes your example so particular. How do we know that it is indeed the case that were the license of Linux a different one it would have never seen the sort of scalability improvements you talk about? I believe that some other closed source OSs are scalable, so it can't be down to the license, can it? In any case, perhaps I don't know enough about the details of the case you are mentioning.

    Leave a comment:

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