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An Early Benchmark Of The NVIDIA CUDA GPU Performance On WSL2

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  • An Early Benchmark Of The NVIDIA CUDA GPU Performance On WSL2

    Phoronix: An Early Benchmark Of The NVIDIA CUDA GPU Performance On WSL2

    Our recent benchmarks have shown WSL/WSL2 performance on the latest Windows 10 builds to generally be quite good compared to running bare metal Linux. But past the May 2020 Update and on the latest Insider Preview builds is the initial support for GPU acceleration in conjunction with updated Windows graphics drivers. The initial emphasis is on GPU compute with DirectML and for NVIDIA hardware CUDA support as well. Here are a couple CUDA benchmarks that ran gracefully under WSL2 albeit the performance leaves a lot to be desired...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...erf-Early-Look

  • #2
    Can't say I'm surprised. Compute is one workload you really, really want to run on bare metal. There's a reason specialized hardware was created for it.

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    • #3
      Yabut it's a start, and at least some bits work. Whether or not the current performance penalty is inherent is up for debate. The qemu boys seem to do pretty well, at least with video passthrough: https://wiki.gentoo.org/wiki/GPU_pas...bvirt_qemu_kvm

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      • #4
        Did you just...

        Darmstadt Automotive Parallel Heterogeneous Suite
        Wait did I just steal their name for my recording software?! D:

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        • #5
          Originally posted by tildearrow View Post
          Did you just...



          Wait did I just steal their name for my recording software?! D:
          It's a new test, yes. Added to PTS/OpenBenchmarking a few days ago when scrolling through CUDA projects on GitHub. And being a fan of a few breweries in Darmstadt from a SUSE'r that lives there, I couldn't resist as I love the town.

          But it's short name of the upstream benchmark is DAPHNE.
          Michael Larabel
          http://www.michaellarabel.com/

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          • #6
            What a shit...

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            • #7
              What is even the point of running CUDA in a virtual machine? I wouldn't even ask the question of what's the point of using CUDA in the first place

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              • #8
                Is it possible to get native Windows 10 numbers for these tests?

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by bug77 View Post
                  Can't say I'm surprised. Compute is one workload you really, really want to run on bare metal. There's a reason specialized hardware was created for it.
                  There are a lot of compute heavy workloads not run on bare metal.
                  https://www.nvidia.com/en-us/data-ce...rtual-pc-apps/

                  Grid for example is used by AMS with hypervisor instances there are also fpga passed though as well. This is really about server density.

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                  • #10
                    I've run lot of CUDA things in docker containers. Not really pure-virtualization, but not bare-metal either. There is a small (2-8%) penalty I've noticed, probably because the io on the docker filesystem is really slow.

                    To be able to run on a vm on windows without a passthrough, it's impressive that they can even use CUDA through such a layer. It's good for testing maybe. But I wouldn't do any serious dev on windows in the first place, but many people do and they like it just fine.

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