Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

NVIDIA 440.59 Linux Driver Brings DP MST Audio, PRIME Sync For Linux 5.4+

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • NVIDIA 440.59 Linux Driver Brings DP MST Audio, PRIME Sync For Linux 5.4+

    Phoronix: NVIDIA 440.59 Linux Driver Brings DP MST Audio, PRIME Sync For Linux 5.4+

    NVIDIA has kicked off February by releasing the 440.59 Linux driver as their newest stable driver...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...9-Linux-Driver

  • #2
    PRIME Synchronization is advertised as new though we've seen it in early 440 series releases, and more.
    Prime Sync was broken specifically on kernel 5.4; it worked fine on previous kernels.

    Comment


    • #3
      What is PRIME Sync?

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by FireBurn View Post
        What is PRIME Sync?
        I was going to start trying to explain it, but this would explain it better than I ever could:
        https://devtalk.nvidia.com/default/t...nchronization/

        Look forward to the fixed prime-sync. The tearing has been a minor annoyance, but I've managed to live with it for the timebeing.

        Comment


        • #5
          So this release is basically bug fixes.

          Being that it's NVIDIA, there is good reason to find time to read the release notes to see what cards will no longer be supported.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by FireBurn View Post
            What is PRIME Sync?
            The above-linked post on NV forums explains it nicely, but in-short, if you use the traditional NVIDIA Optimus method (render everything on the NV GPU and then output to the Intel-controlled built-in display), PRIME Sync allows for Vsync and a reduction in screen tearing. Without PRIME Sync on that set-up, there's no Vsync, and you'll likely have screen tearing and an overall feeling of things not animating/moving smoothly.

            I don't believe it's applicable when using PRIME Render Offload though (the new Optimus method where you can use the NVIDIA GPU on-demand; basically like official Bumblebee); but that generally doesn't have screen tearing, and seems to respect Vsync.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by NotMine999 View Post
              Being that it's NVIDIA, there is good reason to find time to read the release notes to see what cards will no longer be supported.
              I know you're joking, but it has no basis in reality (i.e. it's not funny). Nvidia wouldn't announce that in a point release. They have a clear map of legacy timeframes, what is a short-lived branch, long-lived branch, etc.

              Comment


              • #8
                I consistently get a kernel use-after-free from nvidia every boot on Linux 5.5 with this driver. Hopefully it gets fixed up with the next release. This release did fix a problem I was having with monitor scaling though.

                Comment


                • #9
                  breaks on latest clearlinux 32280 - compilations issues.

                  Comment

                  Working...
                  X