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NVIDIA 415.27 Linux Driver Released With GeForce RTX 2060 Support

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  • NVIDIA 415.27 Linux Driver Released With GeForce RTX 2060 Support

    Phoronix: NVIDIA 415.27 Linux Driver Released With GeForce RTX 2060 Support

    With NVIDIA today officially shipping the GeForce RTX 2060 as the new $349 USD Turing graphics card, the 415.27 Linux driver was released today to officially support this new graphics card...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...7-Linux-Driver

  • rabcor
    replied
    I just got a laptop with an RTX 2060 card, I'm having some atrocious issues with it, unreliable performance, the 2060 is supposed to be similar to the 980-Ti (equal or better; this remains true for laptop models), but I copied my mpv configuration from my desktop which has a 980-Ti, and tried it on the laptop with the 2060, it lags to shit, it's unwatchable.

    Even if I disable the interpolation (the most likely culprit of performance issues with mpv) it was still delaying hundreds of frames per minute when using the hardware accelerated profile in mpv.

    Quite disappointing, I don't know if this is drivers or hardware yet though.

    Leave a comment:


  • rhysk
    replied
    The only other listed change with the NVIDIA 415.27 Linux driver release is a new NVreg_RestrictProfilingToAdminUsers kernel module parameter if wishing to restrict access to GPU performance counters to root/sudo users only.
    More specifically, this is a step NVIDIA is taking in response to CVE-2018-6260, which was described by researchers in "Rendered Insecure: GPU Side Channel Attacks are Practical".

    NVIDIA describe the new functionality as:

    Restricting access to GPU performance counters

    The NVIDIA graphics driver contains a vulnerability that may allow access
    to application data processed on the GPU through a side channel exposed by
    the GPU performance counters. In order to prevent this vulnerability from
    being exploited, usage of the GPU performance counters can be restricted
    to system administrators (users with the CAP_SYS_ADMIN capability set), on
    systems where it is unnecessary for unprivileged users to utilize GPU
    performance counters.

    Access to GPU performance counters can be restricted by setting the kernel
    module parameter "NVreg_RestrictProfilingToAdminUsers=1" in the nvidia.ko
    kernel module. This can be set on the command line when loading the
    module, or more appropriately via your distribution's kernel module
    configuration files (such as those under /etc/modprobe.d/). By default,
    the GPU performance counters are not restricted to users with the
    CAP_SYS_ADMIN capability.

    For further information on side-channel attacks via the GPU performance
    counters as described by CVE-2018-6260, please see the security notice
    located at: https://nvidia.custhelp.com/app/answ...tail/a_id/4738.

    Leave a comment:


  • Brisse
    replied
    theriddick This is not the same driver as the one that was released to Windows users.

    Leave a comment:


  • theriddick
    replied
    Where is adaptive sync? windows has it already. Guess I'll move back to windows until it appears on linux, for testing purposes.

    Leave a comment:


  • bosjc
    replied
    Originally posted by Brisse View Post
    Meanwhile, in Windows-land, Nvidia released 417.71 with support for VESA Adaptive Sync, aka. "Freesync" on Pascal GPU's and newer. I wonder if that will make it to Linux-land eventually...
    Yeah, they announced today as the day with driver support (without specifying any platforms). I was rather shocked to see a Linux driver update this morning along with the Windows one - then looked into and realized nvidia was just trolling us as usual. Hopefully they get it out and done soon - have a new freesync monitor coming in this week that I would like to test out before the return period is up.

    Leave a comment:


  • mlau
    replied
    Originally posted by birdie View Post

    Currently works only via DisplayPort.

    NVIDIA developers are mum about the ETA for this feature but that's not a surprise as it's always been like this.
    Is there anything else required from the window system to use freesync/gsync/vrr ?

    Leave a comment:


  • birdie
    replied
    Originally posted by Brisse View Post
    Meanwhile, in Windows-land, Nvidia released 417.71 with support for VESA Adaptive Sync, aka. "Freesync" on Pascal GPU's and newer. I wonder if that will make it to Linux-land eventually...
    Currently works only via DisplayPort.

    NVIDIA developers are mum about the ETA for this feature but that's not a surprise as it's always been like this.

    Leave a comment:


  • Brisse
    replied
    Meanwhile, in Windows-land, Nvidia released 417.71 with support for VESA Adaptive Sync, aka. "Freesync" on Pascal GPU's and newer. I wonder if that will make it to Linux-land eventually...

    Leave a comment:

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