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[email protected] Performance Is Looking Good On The GeForce RTX 2080 Ti

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  • [email protected] Performance Is Looking Good On The GeForce RTX 2080 Ti

    Phoronix: [email protected] Performance Is Looking Good On The GeForce RTX 2080 Ti

    Yesterday I published a number of CUDA and OpenCL benchmarks for the NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2080 Ti graphics card that happened to show the very strong GPU compote potential for this new Turing GPU. Another workload with promising potential for this powerful but pricey graphics card is [email protected]

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...80-Ti-FAH-Perf

  • #2
    What about the performance per watt per dollar perspective? I guess the 2080 Ti wouldn't do so well in this metric. Also the generational jump was bigger from the 980 Ti to the 1080 Ti than from the 1080 Ti to the 2080 Ti if I am not mistaken. So what is there besides absolute performance to be excited about?

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    • #3
      Any Ray Tracing benches to be had? Seems like Unity3d will finally release the radeon rays in the latest beta, will be interesting to compare that to what RTX does (feature wise). But no other games/engines seem to have bothered with the RR. Seems useful for the rest of us.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by bofh80 View Post
        Any Ray Tracing benches to be had? Seems like Unity3d will finally release the radeon rays in the latest beta, will be interesting to compare that to what RTX does (feature wise). But no other games/engines seem to have bothered with the RR. Seems useful for the rest of us.
        Not aware of any Linux native software currently supporting RTX, benchmark or not...
        Michael Larabel
        http://www.michaellarabel.com/

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Michael View Post
          Not aware of any Linux native software currently supporting RTX, benchmark or not...
          LOL, there aren't even any Windows applications.

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          • #6
            I am afraid miners are going to like this...

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Dedale View Post
              I am afraid miners are going to like this...
              Meh, miners tend to prefer cost-effective cards

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Michael View Post

                Not aware of any Linux native software currently supporting RTX, benchmark or not...
                Oh well, I guess they'll come soon enough. Looked a bit bleak, was hoping I'd missed something.

                For the alternative, this should work on various cards, it would be interesting I suppose. Better to see in a game i guess(unity3d) but could maybe time the default unit test:
                • -genref 1 generate reference images
                https://github.com/GPUOpen-Libraries...oRender-Baikal

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by fuzz View Post

                  Meh, miners tend to prefer cost-effective cards
                  Yup, performance per dollar is king in mining. This is where AMD consistently beats intel/nvidia. Miners are looking for value, whereas gamers are willing to spend nonsensical amounts of money for +2 fps in their favourite game.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by ms178 View Post
                    So what is there besides absolute performance to be excited about?
                    Performance is perhaps the least exciting thing about the 2000 series. This is a bet on the future with the likes of ray tracing and deep learning AA with DLSS. Though these technologies have come out the gate being highly proprietary and are unlikely to be of interest to Linux users for a long time.

                    It seems to be very Physx-like in the support model in that developers need to be enticed into using it, it's currently vendor-specific and there's few consumers with deep enough pockets to target. So you're only going to get it on big engines like Frostbite and Unreal 4. The former has no Linux titles, and the latter hasn't made waves in Linux despite being a supported platform.

                    But like Physx, I'd expect the principle to make its way into the mainstream eventually. And once it's hit a critical mass in like five years or something it'll be relevant rather than the niche that it's likely to be in the short term.

                    For now, I think Linux users can disregard it as Nvidia bs and wait until it's in Vulkan, supported by AMD and viable in Linux. If the technologies stay proprietary indefinitely then I can't see them going anywhere.

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