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Google Proposing HDCP Content Protection Be Added To Intel's Linux Graphics Driver

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  • #21
    Originally posted by kravemir View Post
    How can HDCP actually prevent against making of illegal copies? It seems as only software limitation. And, it can be avoided using custom software,...
    Lolwut? Locked-down software can't always be flashed with custom software.

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    • #22
      I can't believe this technology is still a thing. Seriously, when you can pay $10 for Netflix and watch a lot of TV series and movies on-demand, practically perpetually, why the heck do you need digital rights management? And as more and more movies and TV series become so easy and accessible, it will make digital rights management even more pointless. But by then, we'll have all this dead code in our operating systems and devices.

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      • #23
        DRM doesn't prevent piracy, and is not used with the intent to do so. It's used because attempting to circumvent or inspect it is illegal, even without violating copyright, or intending to allow others to do so. (As proved by the EFF here: https://www.eff.org/deeplinks/2017/1...e-need-do-next)

        In fact, the HDCP master key is publicly available (https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/High...ent_Protection).

        Why does HDCP exist then? It gives content distributors control over their product, after it is "sold." For example, it is illegal to sell a device that stores blu-rays to a hard drive, without permission from the content distributors. If you don't want to deal with blu-ray discs, you'll have to purchase Disney's streaming service. Don't have a device that can stream from there to your TV? Tough luck. Blu-ray scratched? Just go get your legally-guaranteed backup copy ou-- oops, it's now illegal to make one. Buy (or should I say license?) another copy. DRM also makes impossible using protected content in a criticism or parody.

        And Intel gets a licensing fee from device vendors.

        Should this be merged? No. Do I care if it is? No. Linux is free software. Nobody can add DRM, because the user will just remove it.

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        • #24
          Originally posted by user82 View Post
          There is a typo in here, instead of "being played on unauthorized devices" it must say "being played by legitimate customers who happened to buy the wrong devices"
          If you play media on unauthorized devices you aren't a legitimate customer. By buying stuff you sign a legally binding contract to play the media ONLY where the media seller wants you to play it.

          This shit has to be fought at legal level, not by stealing shit and not caring.

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          • #25
            Also, DRM code in general is actually a security threat, since it relies on blobs. How is it even considered by Linux developers and not rejected right away?

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            • #26
              Originally posted by TheSandwichMakr View Post
              Blu-ray scratched? Just go get your legally-guaranteed backup copy ou-- oops, it's now illegal to make one. Buy (or should I say license?) another copy.
              UltraViolet is cool if you are into the movies thing and still buy physical disks http://www.blu-ray.com/uv/uvfaq.php?action=faq

              https://www.myuv.com/

              Nobody can add DRM, because the user will just remove it.
              DRM is by definition optional. Unless I buy stuff that needs it, the thing just sits there.

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              • #27
                Originally posted by kravemir View Post
                What does it help? If I have access to physical media and can decode the content, then I can copy content right there, and don't care what's outside of computer.
                HDCP, just like the retarded "DVD region" thing is stuff that was created for media-oriented embedded devices.

                TVs, DVD/Bluray players, Cable boxes, and similar.


                If you're on a PC there are so much ways to screw around that it is plain useless.

                Also in embedded world it's not hard to bypass that crap, there are 30$ boxes that effectively "remove" HDCP from a digital stream.

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                • #28
                  Originally posted by kravemir View Post
                  How can HDCP actually prevent against making of illegal copies? It seems as only software limitation. And, it can be avoided using custom software,...
                  ssh is also software. hdcp is pointless because adversary has access to decoding key by design(otherwise he can't watch protected content). it is just an exercise at hiding key under adversary's carpet

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                  • #29
                    DRM has been built in Intel CPU's since the Pentium D back in 2005. This simply brings it up to the display level.

                    For those who say "Netflix is only $10, why is it a big deal?" Netflix is about to lose much of its content in 2018 as many of their initial content deals come up for renewal (or lack there of). Netflix is scrambling to create content to replace it, but look for a major shakedown at Netflix this year. They are going to start losing subscribers within 18 months.

                    Disney has already announced that once their streamer channel fires up, Netflix will lose a majority of their content. (Star Wars Trilogy is still in doubt) CBS/Paramount has said the same though they said content like "Star Trek-Classic" and other cult shows will remain.

                    The market is shifting to streamers and Intel is simply putting a plug at the display to stop the copy leaks. It took Netflix and Microsoft a full year just to get a HTML5 based encryption scheme working so they could drop Silverlight for playback and secure the stream. All for nothing as people simply copied off the HDMI port. The only thing that may stop the streamer movement in its tracks is the recent Net Neutrality decision. Comcast is already planning a new tiered bandwidth offering in response.

                    But this is a throwback to the old days when even Quick Time wouldn't play on second monitors to keep people from projecting movies on devices not sized for computer use.

                    This is all about control of content. Did you know it is illegal to show the Super Bowl on a screen larger that 55"? NFL deems a screen larger as not "personal use". Congress has amended some of these rules due to lawsuits, but it is getting ridiculous. The desire to control content post release is growing and growing.

                    Content creators have a mindset that one should pay for every single time a person watches it. They would like to eliminate owning media entirely.

                    Even movie theater owners are complaining. Disney's rental agreements for the Marvel films is forcing more theaters to take them in second run or raise the ticket prices just for those releases. Higher ticket prices shifts more viewing to streaming and rentals. Less movie goers, less concessions, less profit.

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                    • #30
                      Originally posted by kravemir View Post

                      So, where decoding happens? On computer, or in display? If it happens on computer, then there's practically no blocker. If it happens on display, then can it be played in non full-screen mode? How would you compose video with other windows and desktop effects?
                      4k decoding on PC happens on the GPU, decryption probably on the CPU. So the decryption keys are in your RAM, just find them, easy-peasy. The problem is, licensed players have to use some Memory encryption features only available on Kabylake+ CPUs to make it harder to leak the keys. It is a cat and mouse game. Currently there is no public known way to get decryption Keys from 4k Netflix, Amazon or 4k Bluray. But some people/companies do know how to download from Amazon and get decryption keys for UHD Bluray. Nobody knows how they do it. It is much more complicated then "Oh it decrypts on my CPU, so I can just dump the key".


                      Originally posted by starshipeleven View Post
                      By buying stuff you sign a legally binding contract to play the media ONLY where the media seller wants you to play it.
                      When I buy blurays in the store, I sign no such thing. But I heared in the USA the customer can get fucked after handing over the cash. Also EULAs are practically worthless in parts of Europe. The law does however limit our right to circumvent copy protections...


                      Originally posted by edwaleni View Post
                      Did you know it is illegal to show the Super Bowl on a screen larger that 55"? NFL deems a screen larger as not "personal use".
                      Are you sure about that and do you have a link stating that? My 1 minute google-foo didn't turn anything up.

                      Last edited by Mathias; 11-30-2017, 12:45 PM.

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