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Google Proposing HDCP Content Protection Be Added To Intel's Linux Graphics Driver

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  • #11
    Originally posted by mlau View Post

    it encrypts the video data sent over HDMI / DisplayPort / .. cables. Admittedly a stupid way to "pirate" movies, given the datarates involved. There's easier ways
    to get at the already compressed source...
    Not if the source has DRM too.
    ## VGA ##
    AMD: X1950XTX, HD3870, HD5870
    Intel: GMA45, HD3000 (Core i5 2500K)

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    • #12
      Originally posted by mlau View Post

      it encrypts the video data sent over HDMI / DisplayPort / .. cables. Admittedly a stupid way to "pirate" movies, given the datarates involved. There's easier ways
      to get at the already compressed source...
      What does it help? If I have access to physical media and can decode the content, then I can copy content right there, and don't care what's outside of computer.

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      • #13
        HDCP makes sense in a scenario where the video stream is DRM-protected, and the DRM implementation (decrypting/decoding) is done in a trusted environment (ARM TrustZone for example). This is how it's already done on many set-top-boxes, playstation, Xbox..

        Not that it's really effective, there are many HDMI splitters out there who will happily strip HDCP if the sink doesn't support it..

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        • #14
          Originally posted by mlau View Post
          it encrypts the video data sent over HDMI / DisplayPort / .. cables. Admittedly a stupid way to "pirate" movies, given the datarates involved. There's easier ways
          to get at the already compressed source...
          Originally posted by kravemir View Post
          What does it help? If I have access to physical media and can decode the content, then I can copy content right there, and don't care what's outside of computer.

          Still for BD+ protected discs as well as for UHD BDs, the first pirated copies were captured via HDMI and HDCP strippers. Also Netflix is regularly captured via HDMI because nobody knows how to strip the encryption. I also remember that early DVDs were sometimes ripped similarly.

          Sure, theoretically you can simply decrypt the Bluray and have the unmodified video stream. But in the reality its not that simple. Especially the new UHD stuff is well protected.

          The biggest problem with HDCP is, Chinese 10$ HDCP strippers can remove it for the pirate, yet the legal customer can't play his discs on non-supported displays.

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          • #15
            Originally posted by Mathias View Post




            Still for BD+ protected discs as well as for UHD BDs, the first pirated copies were captured via HDMI and HDCP strippers. Also Netflix is regularly captured via HDMI because nobody knows how to strip the encryption. I also remember that early DVDs were sometimes ripped similarly.

            Sure, theoretically you can simply decrypt the Bluray and have the unmodified video stream. But in the reality its not that simple. Especially the new UHD stuff is well protected.

            The biggest problem with HDCP is, Chinese 10$ HDCP strippers can remove it for the pirate, yet the legal customer can't play his discs on non-supported displays.
            So, where decoding happens? On computer, or in display? If it happens on computer, then there's practically no blocker. If it happens on display, then can it be played in non full-screen mode? How would you compose video with other windows and desktop effects?

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            • #16
              http://www.businesswire.com/news/hom...ICs-Convert-4K

              The reality is its not like HDCP support in intel driver going to improve security. Above is a chip that simply takes HDMI and makes of all things CSI-2 that a raspberry pi 3 takes in as camera and it supports the cable transmitting HDCP 1.3 encrypted. There is HDCP 1.4 supporting to CSI-2 as well. Basically to prevent this form of capture would require black listing the old HDCP 1.x outputs and forcing HDCP 2.2 supporting devices. Why not HDCP 2.0 and 2.1 they are already cracked and deprecated.

              Now does these patches support HDCP 2.2? Even if it does support HDCP 2.2 there are china made converters that take HDCP 2.2 in one side and output HDCP 1.4 or HDCP 1.3 on the other so that old HDMI monitors work with new HDCP 2.2 content. Of course this does not prevent you putting a HDMI to CSI-2 after the converters and have a raspberry pi 3 capture so rendering HDCP basically worthless for protecting the content travelling over the cable. This does not require hacking anything its just buying the right off the shelf parts and putting it together in the right way..

              So the analog output hole just requires more parts but is fairly much alive and well. All HDCP does is force people who don't know better to buy new hardware instead of a converter. The converters means anyone setup with capture gear for HDCP 1.4 with a little box can capture HDCP 2.2 as well.

              Reality HDCP is Swiss cheese. Maybe when HDCP 2.3 comes out it might be different. All HDCP is really doing is causing end users to suffer from HDCP sync failures not protecting content from anyone serous-ally wanting it.

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              • #17
                No, this garbage should be rejected by Mesa developers. I hope they understand how toxic and unethical this stuff is.

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                • #18
                  Originally posted by shmerl View Post
                  No, this garbage should be rejected by Mesa developers. I hope they understand how toxic and unethical this stuff is.
                  This is Direct Rendering Manager side, not Mesa.
                  Michael Larabel
                  http://www.michaellarabel.com/

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                  • #19
                    Originally posted by Michael View Post

                    This is Direct Rendering Manager side, not Mesa.
                    Either way, it would be quite disgusting if Linux graphics stack would ship DRM code. It's enough that even Mozilla started shipping EME, and now this...

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                    • #20
                      This would allow a licensed bluray player app such as powerdvd/windvd to run on linux. I highly doubt either company would create such an app though.

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