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Linux 4.15 Will Finally Graduate Intel "Coffee Lake" Graphics Out Of Alpha Support

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  • Linux 4.15 Will Finally Graduate Intel "Coffee Lake" Graphics Out Of Alpha Support

    Phoronix: Linux 4.15 Will Finally Graduate Intel "Coffee Lake" Graphics Out Of Alpha Support

    Another set of Intel Direct Rendering Manager (DRM) driver updates were mailed in to DRM-Next today for the eventual Linux 4.15 kernel cycle...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...5-CFL-No-Alpha

  • #2
    "Finally"? Coffee Lake was released only a while ago... Typo:

    Originally posted by phoronix View Post
    While the Coffee Lake graphics are basically unchanges from Kabylake,

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by tildearrow View Post
      "Finally"? Coffee Lake was released only a while ago... Typo:
      Thanks,

      Considering Intel usually has support ready pre-launch... and 4.15 won't be released for like ~3 more months, it's a long time.
      Michael Larabel
      http://www.michaellarabel.com/

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      • #4
        I like the Intel graphics drivers they are nice. They are open source, and support OpenGL 4.5, OpenGL ES 3.2, as well as Vulkan.

        Too bad the Intel graphics hardware is very unimpressive. Since nothing happens to it.
        Coffee Lake GPU is same as Kaby Lake which is same as Skylake.
        Skylake CPU pretty much the same as Broadwell and Haswell. Only very minimal changes.

        So the Coffee Lake GPU is essentially pretty much the same as the Haswell GPU.
        Nothing has happened. It is very boring. It hasn't gotten any faster. The performance is as slow as it has always been.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by uid313 View Post
          Too bad the Intel graphics hardware is very unimpressive. Since nothing happens to it.
          Coffee Lake GPU is same as Kaby Lake which is same as Skylake.
          Skylake CPU pretty much the same as Broadwell and Haswell. Only very minimal changes.
          I'm going to take a wild guess here.
          Intel isn't going to move its backside until AMD pulls out their Ryzen-based APUs.

          Assuming they still care about this competition at all.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by uid313 View Post
            Too bad the Intel graphics hardware is very unimpressive. Since nothing happens to it.
            Coffee Lake GPU is same as Kaby Lake which is same as Skylake.
            Skylake CPU pretty much the same as Broadwell and Haswell. Only very minimal changes.

            So the Coffee Lake GPU is essentially pretty much the same as the Haswell GPU.
            Nothing has happened. It is very boring. It hasn't gotten any faster. The performance is as slow as it has always been.
            You can say the same about their CPU's, until AMD forced their hand with Ryzen, Threadripper, and Epyc. Watch as intel magically decides to start beefing up their GPU, once AMD releases the Zen+Vega APU's. When the market has real competition, everyone wins.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by starshipeleven View Post
              I'm going to take a wild guess here.
              Intel isn't going to move its backside until AMD pulls out their Ryzen-based APUs.

              Assuming they still care about this competition at all.
              Yes, I think so too.
              But the thing is, as far as I know, AMD have old APUs that are 5 year old that still have a iGPU perform better than the iGPU in Coffee Lake.

              Originally posted by torsionbar28 View Post
              You can say the same about their CPU's, until AMD forced their hand with Ryzen, Threadripper, and Epyc. Watch as intel magically decides to start beefing up their GPU, once AMD releases the Zen+Vega APU's. When the market has real competition, everyone wins.
              Yes, history show us this.
              Intel is always on their lazy side until AMD catch up.
              First 64-bit? AMD.
              First dual-core? AMD.
              First quad-core? AMD.
              First hexa-core? AMD.
              First octa-core? AMD.
              First integrated GPU? AMD.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by uid313 View Post
                I like the Intel graphics drivers they are nice. They are open source, and support OpenGL 4.5, OpenGL ES 3.2, as well as Vulkan.

                Too bad the Intel graphics hardware is very unimpressive. Since nothing happens to it.
                Coffee Lake GPU is same as Kaby Lake which is same as Skylake.
                Skylake CPU pretty much the same as Broadwell and Haswell. Only very minimal changes.

                So the Coffee Lake GPU is essentially pretty much the same as the Haswell GPU.
                Nothing has happened. It is very boring. It hasn't gotten any faster. The performance is as slow as it has always been.
                actually going from haswell to broadwell was a big jump on the gpu side, those gpu are basically overclocked skylakes

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by uid313 View Post
                  Intel is always on their lazy side until AMD catch up.
                  First 64-bit? AMD.
                  First dual-core? AMD.
                  First quad-core? AMD.
                  First hexa-core? AMD.
                  First octa-core? AMD.
                  First integrated GPU? AMD.
                  This is only true for x86. And it's debatable whether slapping multiple dies on a single CPU really counts as multicore, AMD only recently managed to get 8 cores on a single die. Tilera for example manages 64 cores on a die, and Intel got up to 28.

                  Also Intel is usually the first with new process nodes, whether this still holds true for 10nm remains to be seen.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by nils_ View Post
                    This is only true for x86.
                    Is there some other intel architecture you had in mind? Itanium, lol?

                    Originally posted by nils_ View Post
                    And it's debatable whether slapping multiple dies on a single CPU really counts as multicore,
                    Not really, multi-core means "multiple cores per socket". How those cores are arranged inside the package is just trivia.

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