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Intel Is Working On HDCP Content Protection For Linux Graphics Stack

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  • #31
    Originally posted by Qaridarium View Post

    This is the reason i did not buy any Hollywood Movie production for like 15 years....
    and i will not use stuff like netflix for the same reason.
    I only spend money on stuff what has no harmful DRM/Copy protection function (I never noticed a negative effect on Steam based games)
    Like 15 years ago back in the time i used Windows and software products with harmful DRM/Copy protection i really run into big problems because
    the software really fucked anything up and just stop working after upgrading from windows98/ME to Windows2000/XP...
    So this bad experience ended up in: not buying any DRM/Copyprotected "Movie" and only buy "bug"-"Free"-"Software" from like steam (after they start the Linux support) or better GOG.com,
    *****compared to my income i spend high amount of money to Open/Free-Source software projects (For example Phoronix life-time-premium)

    If the DRM/Copyprotection people end the war on the consumer i will end Boycott their ugly products...
    I'm sure the irony is lost on the DRM / copy protection people that the only time we ever see the copyright notice / warning is when we legitimately buy movies, we never see that shit when they are downloaded.

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    • #32
      The ONLY Legit purpose I can see for HDCP on Linux is to have a commercial Blu-ray player software. But then again probably the best one (powerdvd) on Windows pretty much stinks and is way overpriced.

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      • #33
        HDCP has been broken for ages, I am unsure why they even bother with it. Who makes use of it even.
        Sometimes I wish that linux was under gplv3.

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        • #34
          This would also be used in digital cinema servers, which use HD-SDI instead of HDMI. Switching projector connectivity to HDMI 2.1 in the coming years would result in better performance and lower costs, as well as compatibility with the newer LED screens that are being shown off by companies like Samsung.

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          • #35
            Originally posted by float View Post
            HDCP has been broken for ages, I am unsure why they even bother with it. Who makes use of it even.
            Sometimes I wish that linux was under gplv3.
            Apparently, movie industry managers know little about technology and eat whatever they are spoon fed by their "consultants", hardware industry exploits their stupidity.

            HDCP's main goal currently is causing hardware incompatibility and obsolescence, as newer HDCP stuff won't work with older versions. This is fucking freat for every honest person that just bought a DVD player to watch his collection of movies he bought and then this DVD player fails to connect to the TV as it is using an older HDCP version.

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            • #36
              Unless you have one of the earliest HDTVs with HDMI and the earliest version of HDCP or no HDCP, it's not likely you'll have a problem. Anything 2006 and newer should be just fine.

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              • #37
                Originally posted by TheLexMachine View Post
                Unless you have one of the earliest HDTVs with HDMI and the earliest version of HDCP or no HDCP, it's not likely you'll have a problem. Anything 2006 and newer should be just fine.
                Wrong, HDCP 2.1 and 2.2 aren't retrocompatible (may depend on content though, sure 4K is out, if it works or not at lesser resolutions depends from what the content provider has decided), so we are more like talking of stuff from before 2012 and 2014 (respectively for 2.1 and 2.2).

                Meanwhile, boxes that sidestep HDCP 2.2 have been made available since like 2015.

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