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Intel's Open-Source Driver Stack Now OpenGL 4.5 Certified, Complements Vulkan & GLES

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  • Intel's Open-Source Driver Stack Now OpenGL 4.5 Certified, Complements Vulkan & GLES

    Phoronix: Intel's Open-Source Driver Stack Now OpenGL 4.5 Certified, Complements Vulkan & GLES

    Intel's open-source Mesa DRI driver has passed The Khronos Group's process for certifying it as a conformant OpenGL 4.5 implementation. This now rounds out the Intel open-source Linux stack with OpenGL 4.5, OpenGL ES 3.2, and Vulkan 1.0 certification...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...GL45-Certified

  • #2
    For which generations does this certification apply? I doubt that Haswell is also certified. The article at 01.org mentions "latest three generations of Intel® Core™ processors" so I guess it's Broadwell+

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    • #3
      Originally posted by blubbaer View Post
      For which generations does this certification apply? I doubt that Haswell is also certified. The article at 01.org mentions "latest three generations of Intel® Core™ processors" so I guess it's Broadwell+
      Yes, Broadwell+ AFAIK
      Michael Larabel
      http://www.michaellarabel.com/

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      • #4
        Great news

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        • #5
          This is awesome and wonderful!
          But I don't understand one thing...
          If Intel's driver is open source, what's with the binary blobs?
          I mean I like graphic features like OpenGL 4.5 and Vulkan, but if it comes with spyware, I'm better off without.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Danny3 View Post
            This is awesome and wonderful!
            But I don't understand one thing...
            If Intel's driver is open source, what's with the binary blobs?
            I mean I like graphic features like OpenGL 4.5 and Vulkan, but if it comes with spyware, I'm better off without.
            AFAIK the binary blobs are for interfacing the driver with the hardware itself, and they handle some very low level functions. They contain stuff that is particular to each processor's architecture. And I may very well be very wrong about this, but I remember reading about it some years ago.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Danny3 View Post
              This is awesome and wonderful!
              But I don't understand one thing...
              If Intel's driver is open source, what's with the binary blobs?
              I mean I like graphic features like OpenGL 4.5 and Vulkan, but if it comes with spyware, I'm better off without.
              The binary blobs are things that don't run on the CPU, but rather directly on their hardware.

              Think of it like your computers BIOS. That's likely not open source on your machine even if you are running an open source OS like linux, and it provides some very low-level hardware specific things.

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              • #8
                Couldn't that be a llvm compiler target?

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by smitty3268 View Post

                  The binary blobs are things that don't run on the CPU, but rather directly on their hardware.

                  Think of it like your computers BIOS. That's likely not open source on your machine even if you are running an open source OS like linux, and it provides some very low-level hardware specific things.
                  nar, I got a opensource BIOS also sorry <g>

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                  • #10
                    This is a *huge* deal for the graphics subsystem of modern GNU/Linux ! All things considered, graphics is now 'fixed' on Linux, next up fixup the audio sub/eco-system(s) so it is competitive at the professional level :|

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