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Intel's Broadwell i7-5775C Runs Much Happier On Fedora 22 Than Ubuntu Linux

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  • Intel's Broadwell i7-5775C Runs Much Happier On Fedora 22 Than Ubuntu Linux

    Phoronix: Intel's Broadwell i7-5775C Runs Much Happier On Fedora 22 Than Ubuntu Linux

    While there's been some stability issues / kernel panics with the high-end Core i7 5775C "Broadwell" processor on Linux, I've found out that Fedora 22 yields a much better experience than Ubuntu 15.04/15.10...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...-Good-For-5775

  • #2
    Maybe Ubuntu have a different Intel Microcode as they had a different version of Catalyst?

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    • #3
      This is good news! However don't blame the kernel nOr the code base, if Ubuntu can't configure a correct kernel it is Ubuntus fault not the kernel. Frankly this reflects poorly on the Ubuntu team, but frankly immnot surprised as I've never understood Ubuntus attraction as it has never been extremely stable nor mainstream.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by wizard69 View Post
        This is good news! However don't blame the kernel nOr the code base, if Ubuntu can't configure a correct kernel it is Ubuntus fault not the kernel. Frankly this reflects poorly on the Ubuntu team, but frankly immnot surprised as I've never understood Ubuntus attraction as it has never been extremely stable nor mainstream.
        huh?
        both sides are to blame. why do you think kernel nor code base should be blamed. are they immune like the pope?
        There are always two sides of one medal.

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        • #5
          I'm not sure the kernel is at fault here. I think andrei_me is on to something, it could be Fedora applies a microcode update by default, while Ubuntu doesn't.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by wizard69 View Post
            This is good news! However don't blame the kernel nOr the code base, if Ubuntu can't configure a correct kernel it is Ubuntus fault not the kernel. Frankly this reflects poorly on the Ubuntu team, but frankly immnot surprised as I've never understood Ubuntus attraction as it has never been extremely stable nor mainstream.

            Not mainstream? Are you joking?
            Yeah, it's not mainstream if you include all computer users but amongst Linux users it undoubtedly is.

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            • #7
              Maybe Fedora has microcode updates which are not in the UEFI firmware. Check
              Code:
              dmesg|grep microcode
              But i don't see any recent updates...

              https://downloadcenter.intel.com/sea...code+Data+File
              Last edited by Kano; 15 July 2015, 03:16 AM.

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              • #8
                Have to agree on both overcomplexity on hardware and software side.
                I've been compiling my own kernels (every major version) since early 2.0.x and I don't like the path Linux has been taking during the last couple of years.
                I configure my kernels with a minimal set of drivers with no initrd and no modules needed for the laptop, which means that my "configured" fatureset has been roughly the same during the last 10 years. Yet the kernel code size has blown completely out of proportions. Even if I disable almost everything it is not possible to reach anything like the sizes we used to have with perfectly functional kernels.
                Kernel bloat and overfunctionality create complex problems. Add to it the latest developments of hardly functional GPU drivers with all the complexity they add to the ecosystem of a kernel and then you have the perfect mess.

                I recently switched my old (and perfectly functional) Penryn/Nvidia machine to a Broadwell/Nvidia with Optimus.
                Boy what a piece of crap this new laptop is... (same manufacturer, same series).

                Nvidia drivers won't work natively any more (Optimus).
                Getting nvidia drivers to work is half-assed and buggy. (Bumblebee, Hybrid solutions).
                The built-in Intel GPU (i915 driver with userland stack) has so may problems it should not have made it out of staging.
                - Broken console. Tearing, sync-issues.
                - Suspend of various sorts broken.
                - Loads of various kernel crashes on Broadwell.
                - SNA still somewhat broken.
                - You have to add bucketloads of kernel parameters to get the i915 driver to a half-stable state.
                - Intel P-state driver creates issues with GPU.

                Bottom line is that i don't care much about feature development if it comes at the cost of stability.

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                • #9
                  Why would Optimus be so buggy? Ubuntu has nvidia-prime switching and for Kanotix Spitfire (Debian Jessie) i have got a little helper script. You can not use vsync when active thats correct.

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                  • #10
                    How about Debian or SteamOS and Broadwell? I want to buy one.. Im just curious if will Broadwell run with old Ubuntu 10.10 - 2.6.x kernel, which i have still installed as backup OS, Sandy Bridge is working with it.

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