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Intel Continues Readying Linux For Lunar Lake's New Adaptive Sharpening Filter

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  • Intel Continues Readying Linux For Lunar Lake's New Adaptive Sharpening Filter

    Phoronix: Intel Continues Readying Linux For Lunar Lake's New Adaptive Sharpening Filter

    Back in February I wrote about Intel's open-source graphics driver engineers working on a new adaptive sharpening filter capability to be found with upcoming Xe2 graphics starting with Lunar Lake. This new adaptive sharpening filter has minimal power and performance impact and at least according to the driver engineers is working out rather well. Besides the Intel Xe kernel driver support around enabling this adaptive sharpening filter, Intel has also been readying the rest of the Linux desktop stack for exposing this capability...

    Phoronix, Linux Hardware Reviews, Linux hardware benchmarks, Linux server benchmarks, Linux benchmarking, Desktop Linux, Linux performance, Open Source graphics, Linux How To, Ubuntu benchmarks, Ubuntu hardware, Phoronix Test Suite

  • #2
    Fixed-function makes a comeback? Interesting.

    Pixel art might not be the best way to showcase this feature though...
    Last edited by tildearrow; 08 July 2024, 06:39 AM.

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    • #3
      Need to see this in action with XWayland up-scaling a non-HiDPI aware application. How well does it really work in practice?

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      • #4
        The images here show a brightness/contrast improvement - nothing in the images shows anything close to a better "sharpness".

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        • #5
          Guessing this will be handy for XeSS

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          • #6
            Originally posted by lowflyer View Post
            The images here show a brightness/contrast improvement - nothing in the images shows anything close to a better "sharpness".
            More contrast equates to more sharpness. That's how all sharpness filters work. It's also the reason we get these lines around sharp edges. Some filters have a threshold to ignore plain areas and only "sharpen" edges and then you can have different window sizes (the smaller the window the more contrast you can apply).

            The only other way to get more sharpness would be to invent new pixels like AI upscaling does.

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            • #7
              I would have to see how it compares to cas which is still quite good for a post processing filter.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Anux View Post
                More contrast equates to more sharpness. That's how all sharpness filters work. It's also the reason we get these lines around sharp edges. Some filters have a threshold to ignore plain areas and only "sharpen" edges and then you can have different window sizes (the smaller the window the more contrast you can apply).

                The only other way to get more sharpness would be to invent new pixels like AI upscaling does.
                I politely disagree.

                As a photographer, I very well know that a higher contrast is often misinterpreted as "more sharpness" or "more crispy".

                What you describe is the "edge effect" - it has nothing to do with contrast. This effect is is unfortunately called "local contrast" by many tools (lightroom etc.). This is what "sharpness filters" usually implement. It was even implemented chemically in the films by Kodak, Fuji etc. back in the 1980's.

                When you carefully look at the example pictures from this article, you see that this "edge effect" is already present in the first image which is supposed to be the "untreated original". The other pictures are just variations with different brightness and contrast of this first one. Not really something that I could not get by adjusting these values on the monitor...

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by lowflyer View Post
                  I politely disagree.
                  Then please explain to us how your theoretical sharpness filter would work without increasing contrast in some form.

                  As a photographer, I very well know that a higher contrast is often misinterpreted as "more sharpness" or "more crispy".
                  There is nothing to misinterpret there, it's exactly that. It's how our eyes work. At night we can hardly make out any detail and the brighter the sun gets the more fine detail we can see. The "resolution" of our eyes always stays the same. So what do you think sharpness is in the real world other than more contrast?

                  What you describe is the "edge effect" - it has nothing to do with contrast.
                  Of course it has everything to do with contrast. Increasing contrast is done by increasing the brightness difference of at least 2 pixels and since with sharpening we cant increase the contrast globally (8 bit sRGB has it's limits) without clipping we will get these highlighted lines around edges from adaptive/windowed contrast application.

                  This effect is is unfortunately called "local contrast" by many tools (lightroom etc.). This is what "sharpness filters" usually implement.
                  Exactly what I was telling you, local contrast, micro contrast, adaptive sharpening or unsharpening mask, virtually anyone implementing it gave it another name. And the thing in the article is exactly the same.

                  It was even implemented chemically in the films by Kodak, Fuji etc. back in the 1980's.
                  I think you lack some understanding of the physics behind analog film. The only way there could be something like sharpening would be at the photographic development (light room) stage, but even there I wouldn't know how to do it in analog, can you give a wikipedia link to that?

                  When you carefully look at the example pictures from this article, you see that this "edge effect" is already present in the first image which is supposed to be the "untreated original".
                  No there is none of that. (We are talking about the pixel art minotaur?) Edit: Maybe your monitor is applying sharpening, try to disable it in the monitors settings.

                  The other pictures are just variations with different brightness and contrast of this first one. Not really something that I could not get by adjusting these values on the monitor...
                  No you wouldn't get the lines around sharp edges with global contrast or brightness. Just try it in GIMP.
                  Last edited by Anux; 10 July 2024, 07:01 AM.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Anux View Post
                    Then please explain to us how your theoretical sharpness filter would work without increasing contrast in some form.


                    There is nothing to misinterpret there, it's exactly that. It's how our eyes work. At night we can hardly make out any detail and the brighter the sun gets the more fine detail we can see. The "resolution" of our eyes always stays the same. So what do you think sharpness is in the real world other than more contrast?


                    Of course it has everything to do with contrast. Increasing contrast is done by increasing the brightness difference of at least 2 pixels and since with sharpening we cant increase the contrast globally (8 bit sRGB has it's limits) without clipping we will get these highlighted lines around edges from adaptive/windowed contrast application.


                    Exactly what I was telling you, local contrast, micro contrast, adaptive sharpening or unsharpening mask, virtually anyone implementing it gave it another name. And the thing in the article is exactly the same.


                    I think you lack some understanding of the physics behind analog film. The only way there could be something like sharpening would be at the photographic development (light room) stage, but even there I wouldn't know how to do it in analog, can you give a wikipedia link to that?


                    No there is none of that. (We are talking about the pixel art minotaur?) Edit: Maybe your monitor is applying sharpening, try to disable it in the monitors settings.


                    No you wouldn't get the lines around sharp edges with global contrast or brightness. Just try it in GIMP.
                    I see.

                    No need for politeness here...

                    You're wrong on so many levels. Please do all of us a favor and don't post things that you have no clue about.

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