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Intel Takes Open-Source Hyperscan Development To Proprietary Licensed Software

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  • uid313
    replied
    I think Intel is shooting themselves in the foot with this one. They could be the leader and steward of an open source project that they promote as an Intel open source project with the Intel logo and Intel branding that way people are going to associate that software with Intel and just assume that it works best with Intel hardware and then favor Intel hardware.

    Now the project is forked and the community is moving to the fork and Intel's part in it will be forgotten.

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  • kurkosdr
    replied
    Originally posted by sandain View Post

    Lol. Tell us you have no idea how software licenses work without actually telling us. It is their software. It could have been written using any license under the sun, including GPL, and they would still be allowed to relicense it to _whatever_ they want. Any BSD licensed version is still BSD licensed and available for forking as has already been done.
    Indeed, the copyright holder can re-license any software they have copyright on to any license they want. So if 1) the project owner doesn't accept any third-party contributions or 2) they force any third-party contributors to sign a "contributors agreement" where they transfer copyright to the project owner, then the project owner can re-license the project to whatever they want. A middle ground is forcing contributors to sign a "contributors agreement" which allows re-licensing under specific licenses but third-party contributors keep the copyright.

    Anyway, it seems like Intel is the sole contributor to the project, so they own the copyright to the whole thing anyway, so it's case #1 above.

    The good news is that the last open-source-licensed version can always be forked.
    Last edited by kurkosdr; 10 May 2024, 04:13 PM.

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  • archkde
    replied
    Originally posted by sandain View Post

    Lol. Tell us you have no idea how software licenses work without actually telling us. It is their software. It could have been written using any license under the sun, including GPL, and they would still be allowed to relicense it to _whatever_ they want. Any BSD licensed version is still BSD licensed and available for forking as has already been done.
    While the general idea is true, I'm not sure if the code is really fully Intel's, given that there are quite a bunch of contributors listed.

    Leave a comment:


  • qlum
    replied
    End of the day Intel works for Intel, I can imagine keeping such a library open source when code could just be merged in a fork that works on all competitors just makes it pointless for intel to continue it's development in the open, a shame but understandable.

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  • yakushabb
    replied
    I hate the "Open Source" philosophy. It's open until it makes money.

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  • User42
    replied
    Originally posted by geerge View Post
    And now vectorscan exists. What a move.

    edit: Or is it 4D chess. Hyperscan dies, vectorscan flourishes, intel no longer spends devs. Why bother finding maintainers to offload the project to when people will hate-maintain forever.
    It's usually not that one game but a very close one: management says they can't afford providing the resources for it; the Team relicenses; a fork is born, with an equally permissive license; the Team is reduced to a couple employees.

    And now what? You say...

    Now Intel's game is both to

    1. sell licences to Enterprise, who find it easier to deal with big companies than using Open Source tools anyway;
    2. allocate juste enough resources for the proprietary product to stay atop.

    That second point requires 2 good devs only... The more you add, the wider the gap will be. Because it's BSD, they can integrate all the open source changes in their codebase for free while working on killer features the community doesn't have the committed resources to invest in the platform (and if they do, it can be merged back in Intel's product anyway so they can work on something else that'll give them an edge).

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  • pWe00Iri3e7Z9lHOX2Qx
    replied
    This thing must be hella performant if they are switching it to a closed source paid library. I can't imagine there's a shortage of regex libraries out there, so it must have a niche it fills.

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  • sandain
    replied
    Originally posted by Volta View Post

    No, it's expected from BSD trash license. I've got the feeling Intel wanted to show how crappy license is this.



    Keep dreaming. It's BSD!
    Lol. Tell us you have no idea how software licenses work without actually telling us. It is their software. It could have been written using any license under the sun, including GPL, and they would still be allowed to relicense it to _whatever_ they want. Any BSD licensed version is still BSD licensed and available for forking as has already been done.

    Leave a comment:


  • Volta
    replied
    Well, that's an open-source disappointment... And it's a freaking regular expression matching library that Intel is now making closed-source.
    No, it's expected from BSD trash license. I've got the feeling Intel wanted to show how crappy license is this.

    Now that's even worse than being just proprietary software but if it were at least freely available to download... So now Hyperscan is just for Intel customers.
    Keep dreaming. It's BSD!

    Leave a comment:


  • geerge
    replied
    And now vectorscan exists. What a move.

    edit: Or is it 4D chess. Hyperscan dies, vectorscan flourishes, intel no longer spends devs. Why bother finding maintainers to offload the project to when people will hate-maintain forever.
    Last edited by geerge; 10 May 2024, 10:41 AM.

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