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Intel Announces Thunderbolt 5 With 120 Gbps Bandwidth Boost

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  • willmore
    replied
    Originally posted by marlock View Post
    I think there's a big lack of appreciation for the fact that an entire 120GB SSD worth of data could soon be sent down an USB cable in a single second, which is waaaay faster than early consumer-grade SSDs could do over an internal wiring in my PC.
    Eight seconds. 120Gb/s for one second != 120GB

    120Gb/s is quite fast, but links like Inifinband passed it a decade ago. Current IB is 10 times this speed.

    Leave a comment:


  • Alliancemd
    replied
    Originally posted by debrouxl View Post
    144 Hz, let alone 540 Hz refresh rate, for displays normally aimed at being watched by humans whose brains can't process images at rates close to those... why, just why ?
    Oh yeah, newer and bigger is better and more expensive, too. Sorry, I temporarily forgot about that.
    Are you really complaining about this?...
    They have more bandwidth and wanted to show what can be done with it, if you don't need all the bandwidth, don't use it, it's for other people

    Leave a comment:


  • marlock
    replied
    I think there's a big lack of appreciation for the fact that an entire 120GB SSD worth of data could soon be sent down an USB cable in a single second, which is waaaay faster than early consumer-grade SSDs could do over an internal wiring in my PC.

    Pretty soon we might as well make all disks "external" and offer USB4 as internal wiring for PC components.


    Also there is a lot of ME - MY USECASE issues being confused with HOMO SAPIENS - HARD LIMITS in this thread.

    I am utterly unable to consciously spot specific paralax, motion and shading flaws in 3D games yet my visual cortex incosnciously gets damn obviously sick from prolongued exposure to wrong 3D (popularly called "3D sickness" and/or "motion sickness"). And I am not an astrophysicist yet I don't call Hubble useless.
    Last edited by marlock; 13 September 2023, 06:10 PM.

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  • Quackdoc
    replied
    Originally posted by timofonic View Post

    The joke never changes. We as users, consumers, producers designers, technicians and engineers are victims of this.

    Anyway, I find stupid that there are two standards. USB isn't so UNIVERSAL at all. I tought USB4 would be the unification of both USB and Thunderbolt, but I was wrong.

    USB5 would be "Thunderbolt 6". 1.7 Tbps. Optical cable and maybe some magical copper way too or a compatible for slow devices such as keyboards, mices, audio and such.

    Fragmentation/segmentation bores me to adopt this crap, really. I would inly use PCIe, fastest Ethernet or similar even in a home infrastructure.

    USB and Thunderbolt are a mess. Slow adoption, too much market segmentation, too slow to be implemented in new devices. It's also a not really great improvemrnt at each iteration. Most computing issues are due to damn bandwidth bottlenecks.
    at this point, Thunderbolt now serves two purposes, Intel's staging grounds for tech that will eventually end up in USB4 (thanks intel much love), as well as a certification/gurantee of features. the main issue with them now is still cost, pcie needs high speed low latency, and the controllers are not cheap, so devices are hence, not cheap, really wish we would see some USB4 pcie addon cards but whatever, at least we are starting to see some hardware with usb4

    Leave a comment:


  • vegabook
    replied
    Originally posted by anarki2 View Post
    The most important addition is missing from the article: 240W charging.
    $2.99 240W "Firestarter" TB5 cable from Alibaba incoming..๐Ÿ‘จโ€๐Ÿš’ ๐Ÿงจ ๐Ÿงฏ ๐Ÿšจ ๐ŸŽ† ๐ŸŒ‹ ๐Ÿ›ฉ ๐Ÿช‚ ๐Ÿซ 
    Last edited by vegabook; 13 September 2023, 01:14 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • timofonic
    replied
    Originally posted by Quackdoc View Post

    I think this will change as thunderbolt/usb4 becomes cheaper. the allure of having a "one cable solution" is really nice
    The joke never changes. We as users, consumers, producers designers, technicians and engineers are victims of this.

    Anyway, I find stupid that there are two standards. USB isn't so UNIVERSAL at all. I tought USB4 would be the unification of both USB and Thunderbolt, but I was wrong.

    USB5 would be "Thunderbolt 6". 1.7 Tbps. Optical cable and maybe some magical copper way too or a compatible for slow devices such as keyboards, mices, audio and such.

    Fragmentation/segmentation bores me to adopt this crap, really. I would inly use PCIe, fastest Ethernet or similar even in a home infrastructure.

    USB and Thunderbolt are a mess. Slow adoption, too much market segmentation, too slow to be implemented in new devices. It's also a not really great improvemrnt at each iteration. Most computing issues are due to damn bandwidth bottlenecks.

    Leave a comment:


  • Quackdoc
    replied
    Originally posted by TheLexMachine View Post

    At this point, Thunderbolt is mostly nothing more than "USB Professional", for high-end Business/Enterprise storage usage. The more bandwidth it has, the faster Flash memory media (SSDs, NVME storage, etc.) and RAID/JBOD disk arrays can be filled/accessed. High-resolution displays are a smaller market segment of Thunderbolt's reach and are mostly confined to the creative professional space, where they need Thunderbolt for "connecting everything" through a hub or monitor with built-in hub. On the consumer side, Thunderbolt is pretty much ignored and irrelevant to the majority of consumers, who will continue to be using USB products of varying generations and features.
    I think this will change as thunderbolt/usb4 becomes cheaper. the allure of having a "one cable solution" is really nice

    Leave a comment:


  • TheLexMachine
    replied
    Originally posted by wswartzendruber View Post
    Man, who cares?

    EDIT: Not that Michael shouldn't cover this, I mean why do we need this from Intel right now?
    At this point, Thunderbolt is mostly nothing more than "USB Professional", for high-end Business/Enterprise storage usage. The more bandwidth it has, the faster Flash memory media (SSDs, NVME storage, etc.) and RAID/JBOD disk arrays can be filled/accessed. High-resolution displays are a smaller market segment of Thunderbolt's reach and are mostly confined to the creative professional space, where they need Thunderbolt for "connecting everything" through a hub or monitor with built-in hub. On the consumer side, Thunderbolt is pretty much ignored and irrelevant to the majority of consumers, who will continue to be using USB products of varying generations and features.

    Leave a comment:


  • Quackdoc
    replied
    Originally posted by Frenzie View Post

    It probably also depends on what you're doing. You can normally easily tell the difference between 60 Hz, 75 Hz and 144 Hz just by moving the mouse. For 240 Hz you might have to go dragging a whole window around, and hope the window is actually rendered at 240 fps while being dragged and also that it's not being limited by your mouse since a regular mouse only polls at 125 Hz.
    thats fair, I use gaming as my baseline since that's really the only thing I care about, well scrolling long text pages helps too,

    Leave a comment:


  • samuelec
    replied

    Originally posted by Lbibass View Post

    It depends. If the GPU has a lot of VRAM, the PCIE speed doesn't matter quite as much. It also depends on the workload.
    I was asking about 4K & Thunderbolt

    Leave a comment:

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