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Intel Posts Linux Patches For Linear Address Space Separation (LASS)

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  • kylew77
    replied
    Originally posted by Spacefish View Post

    Nah, you have 63bit left (less than that due too NX-Flag and such), but typical system don´t use this at all.. Physical addresses aren´t 1:1 mapped to address lines on hardware.. There aren´t even 64 individual address lines to the memory / from the CPU, the socket as no system supports that much real memory.

    63bit still gives you 8 Exabyte of addressable memory with a 8bit wordlength.

    If we every reach this level, the right way to do is to go to 128bit, there are different models availiable for that already.. Some just implement some sort of "bankswitch" instructions where you have in instruction to tell the CPU which 64bit address space in your real address space you want to use. Other models use native 128bit pointers.
    Noob question here, would going to 128bit computing give us the same speed benefits but memory growth that 32bit to 64bit brought?

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  • Spacefish
    replied
    Originally posted by brucethemoose View Post
    Well that seems very sensible, especially if the kernel-side implementation is so simple.

    I assume the boundry will move as more kernel space is allocated/released? Or is kernel space's memory requirement relatively static?
    Nah, you have 63bit left (less than that due too NX-Flag and such), but typical system don´t use this at all.. Physical addresses aren´t 1:1 mapped to address lines on hardware.. There aren´t even 64 individual address lines to the memory / from the CPU, the socket as no system supports that much real memory.

    63bit still gives you 8 Exabyte of addressable memory with a 8bit wordlength.

    If we every reach this level, the right way to do is to go to 128bit, there are different models availiable for that already.. Some just implement some sort of "bankswitch" instructions where you have in instruction to tell the CPU which 64bit address space in your real address space you want to use. Other models use native 128bit pointers.

    Leave a comment:


  • brucethemoose
    replied
    Well that seems very sensible, especially if the kernel-side implementation is so simple.

    I assume the boundry will move as more kernel space is allocated/released? Or is kernel space's memory requirement relatively static?

    Leave a comment:


  • Mahboi
    replied
    Poor title, should've gone with "Intel saves thousands of Linux users' sanity by finally giving them a LASS"

    Leave a comment:


  • Intel Posts Linux Patches For Linear Address Space Separation (LASS)

    Phoronix: Intel Posts Linux Patches For Linear Address Space Separation (LASS)

    An interesting patch series posted by Intel this week for the Linux kernel is working on implementing Linear Address Space Separation (LASS) as a feature coming with future processors to help fend off speculative address accesses across..

    Phoronix, Linux Hardware Reviews, Linux hardware benchmarks, Linux server benchmarks, Linux benchmarking, Desktop Linux, Linux performance, Open Source graphics, Linux How To, Ubuntu benchmarks, Ubuntu hardware, Phoronix Test Suite
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