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Intel Releases DAOS 2.2 Distributed File-System

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  • patrakov
    replied
    Originally posted by zexelon View Post
    Wait... arent they dumping optain??!! The first words in their documentation is "optimized for optain"....

    Always interested in seeing more development in this area but i think I will stick to Glusterfs.

    https://www.hpcwire.com/2022/10/17/d...-google-cloud/

    Quote: "For those users who are committed to Intel Optane Pmem, Intel still plans to release the next generation Intel Optane Pmem devices codenamed Crows Pass. Intel is committed to supporting customers and ecosystem partners and will continue to provide support for existing memory and storage products through end of life. The company will also support development of Compute Express Link (CXL) on future processors and platforms as they believe it will be the future and standard of tiered-memory solutions."

    So apparently CXL would be a successor.
    Last edited by patrakov; 29 October 2022, 02:10 AM.

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  • coder
    replied
    Speaking of Optane, I just noticed Intel lists the P5810X as Launched in Q4 2022!

    Appears to be the same as P5800X, except for higher write IOPS and peak power utilization.


    I think this was probably meant to be the Axboe Special Edition.
    ; )

    Leave a comment:


  • onlyLinuxLuvUBack
    replied
    Originally posted by zexelon View Post
    Wait... arent they dumping optain??!! The first words in their documentation is "optimized for optain"....

    Always interested in seeing more development in this area but i think I will stick to Glusterfs.
    they meant: optimized for un-obtainium storage

    Leave a comment:


  • F.Ultra
    replied
    Originally posted by stormcrow View Post

    Duh. But this is not a product aimed at n00bs nor even the tech press. It's aimed at people that actually handle these kinds of systems day in and day out. Hence the question. Is Intel really this out of touch with customers that they think these useless benchmarks have any impact on adoption or is this strictly aimed at "good copy" for ignorant shareholders? I'm leaning towards the latter. (And it's really not even going to move shareholders either.)
    prob aimed at both shareholders and PHB:s, you have to consider that few enterprises have their technical staff make the technical decisions, most are done by the PHB:s who get sold on some glossy looking paper like these benchmarks.

    Leave a comment:


  • zexelon
    replied
    Wait... arent they dumping optain??!! The first words in their documentation is "optimized for optain"....

    Always interested in seeing more development in this area but i think I will stick to Glusterfs.

    Leave a comment:


  • stormcrow
    replied
    Originally posted by CommunityMember View Post

    No organization that actually run high end distributed file systems use vendor benchmarks (those are intended for marketing to the press and tech n00bs (who almost always take the bait)). The organizations that operate such file systems have teams of people who do their own benchmarks for their own workloads.
    Duh. But this is not a product aimed at n00bs nor even the tech press. It's aimed at people that actually handle these kinds of systems day in and day out. Hence the question. Is Intel really this out of touch with customers that they think these useless benchmarks have any impact on adoption or is this strictly aimed at "good copy" for ignorant shareholders? I'm leaning towards the latter. (And it's really not even going to move shareholders either.)
    Last edited by stormcrow; 22 October 2022, 11:27 AM.

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  • numacross
    replied
    Originally posted by elatllat View Post
    I wonder how DAOS compares to ceph, etc...
    DAOS seems to have some very specific requirements:

    DAOS requires each storage node to have direct access to storage-class memory (SCM). While DAOS is primarily tested and tuned for Intel Optane^TM^ Persistent Memory, the DAOS software stack is built over the Persistent Memory Development Kit (PMDK) and the Direct Access (DAX) feature of the Linux operating systems as described in the SNIA NVM Programming Model. As a result, the open-source DAOS software stack should be able to run transparently over any storage-class memory supported by the PMDK.

    The storage node can optionally be equipped with NVMe (non-volatile memory express)[^10] SSDs to provide capacity. HDDs, as well as SATA andSAS SSDs, are not supported by DAOS. Both NVMe 3D-NAND and Optane SSDs are supported. Optane SSDs are preferred for DAOS installation that targets a very high IOPS rate. NVMe-oF devices are also supported by the userspace storage stack but have never been tested.​
    Which limits it to very high end enterprise hardware, at least officially.

    Ceph by comparison can work over wider array of storage types.

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  • CommunityMember
    replied
    Originally posted by stormcrow View Post
    What is it with Intel and these useless benchmarks...
    No organization that actually run high end distributed file systems use vendor benchmarks (those are intended for marketing to the press and tech n00bs (who almost always take the bait)). The organizations that operate such file systems have teams of people who do their own benchmarks for their own workloads.

    Leave a comment:


  • elatllat
    replied
    I wonder how DAOS compares to ceph, etc...

    Leave a comment:


  • stormcrow
    replied
    What is it with Intel and these useless benchmarks they keep marketing (regarding the pictures)? They're as bad as Apple.

    Leave a comment:

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