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Intel Arc Graphics A770 Launching 12 October For $329 USD

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  • #31
    Will they actually respect the date? Will they have load or just a paper launch again?

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    • #32
      Too bad there is no FP64 on the Arc cards. It makes them useless for [email protected]
      Those who would give up Essential Liberty to purchase a little Temporary Safety,deserve neither Liberty nor Safety.
      Ben Franklin 1755

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      • #33
        Originally posted by Mike Frett View Post
        If Intel is already considering cancelling this GPU endeavour, I'm not going to buy something that will have support ended in a year.
        wrong intel did not cancelling its gpu endeavour they did reduce it from 4 chips per generation from lowend to highend to just 1 chip per generation.

        DG3 will be a 8gb vram card designes mainly for notebooks but there will also be a PCIe card for developers and tech people.

        DG4 will also be only 1 card. they do this until their driver and gpu tech is competive to do 4 or more chips per generation again.

        they accepted that they can not compete in highend for a long time means 5 years or so.

        Phantom circuit Sequence Reducer Dyslexia

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        • #34
          Originally posted by gustavoar View Post
          I'm skeptical of buying if the platform might be dead in a year or so. So I'd wait for the 2nd or 3rd generation to jump in, don't want to be like HDDVD or Betamax.
          Intel is has publicly said it's committed to executing on its roadmap, which means at least one more generation of performance-oriented gaming cards. However, I guess if enough people are taken in by the viscous rumors and speculation, it might ultimately turn out to be a self-fulfilling prophesy.

          I'm not too worried about the prospect of cancellation, for three reasons:
          1. Intel's iGPU are moving onto their own tile, which means they should scale up further and should increasingly resemble the dGPUs (aside from dedicated memory... for now). The more similar they are, the more driver fixes & enhancements the dGPU products would automatically inherit from the ongoing tGPU support.
          2. Intel sells professional & datacenter GPU products with a 5 year availability window, which basically means 5 years of software support.
          3. Intel's software stack is in-tree and open source. This has enabled strong ongoing support for the legacy Radeon products, for example.

          So, I'll see how RDNA 3 lands, but my current expectation is that my next dGPU purchase will be Intel.

          Originally posted by Mike Frett View Post
          If Intel is already considering cancelling this GPU endeavour, I'm not going to buy something that will have support ended in a year.
          ‚ÄčNope. At this stage, that's just FUD. The internet does have a track record of wishing things into existence (or "manifesting" as I think the kids are calling it), so I guess nobody can say for sure.
          Last edited by coder; 29 September 2022, 11:36 AM.

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          • #35
            Originally posted by zexelon View Post
            I am also curios to see how the Intel A770 handles GPU compute loads and if they can cobble together anything close to CUDA. At least ROCm is starting to look like something these days!
            Yes, we need to see some GPU Compute benchmarks on these, from Michael. The few OpenCL benchmarks he has should give us a rough apples-to-apples comparison across the 3 vendors, but I hope he'll also have some oneAPI vs. CUDA benchmarks, in the mix.

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            • #36
              Originally posted by rogerx View Post
              Find it really odd EVGA, as supposedly as successful as EVGA is, is supposedly exiting the GPU market. Maybe just more hype?
              No, it's real. They've announced there will be no RTX 4000 cards, nor any more GPU cards for chips from any chip maker. They're completely exiting the GPU business.

              Originally posted by rogerx View Post
              What would be even funnier, if EVGA is just dumping nVidia for Intel GPU's.
              A couple months ago, I saw a rumor that a couple GPU makers canceled their Intel GPU product lines. Maybe EVGA was one of them.

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              • #37
                Originally posted by Mahboi View Post
                Will they actually respect the date? Will they have load or just a paper launch again?
                Rumors indicate that card makers have been sitting on piles of inventory for a while, so I don't expect availability to be a problem.

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                • #38
                  Originally posted by DarkFoss View Post
                  Too bad there is no FP64 on the Arc cards. It makes them useless for [email protected]
                  There literally must be at least some. You can't support APIs like OpenGL 4.x or DX11 without it!

                  According to TechPowerup, it'll have 1:4 (fp64:fp32), which means 4.3 TFLOPS peak. They don't cite a source on that. I'll update, if I find one.

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                  • #39
                    Originally posted by coder View Post
                    There literally must be at least some. You can't support APIs like OpenGL 4.x or DX11 without it!

                    According to TechPowerup, it'll have 1:4 (fp64:fp32), which means 4.3 TFLOPS peak. They don't cite a source on that. I'll update, if I find one.

                    Intel's recent iGPUs only support it via soft-fp64 support in shaders. No idea about ARC, though. I suppose it's likely native.

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                    • #40
                      Originally posted by smitty3268 View Post
                      Intel's recent iGPUs only support it via soft-fp64 support in shaders. No idea about ARC, though. I suppose it's likely native.
                      Well, it looks like DarkFoss was right:



                      That sucks. I guess if you need lots of fp64, your best bet would be a used Radeon VII -- or better yet, a Radeon Pro VII.

                      Once upon a time, this was really a stand-out feature of Intel iGPUs. From Gen7 to Gen9, their iGPUs actually had a 4:1 fp32:fp64 ratio. That actually made the GT4 Iris Pro graphics, found in some Skylake laptop CPUs, the fastest fp64 consumer product on the market, between when the GTX Titan Black (Kepler) was discontinued and Radeon VII launched.

                      Wow. Now I feel betrayed. It'd be understandable if they wanted to just implement it at just like 32:1 or 64:1, but emulated performance is going to be garbage.

                      And I don't buy for a minute that it takes too many gates. We've had hardware fp80 in Intel FPUs since the 8087. The throughput and latency weren't good, but they used so few transistors you could almost write out the schematics by hand. There's certainly some compromise they could've struck that would've used negligible die area while still providing a lot better performance than emulation.
                      Last edited by coder; 30 September 2022, 02:34 AM.

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