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Intel Core i7 1280P Windows 11 vs. Ubuntu vs. Clear Linux Performance

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  • #11
    Originally posted by lyamc View Post
    Most users have no understanding
    What operation on system files do you mean? What operation users do that system files is so slow?? I use Windows and is fast enough. I use linux and is fas enough too.

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    • #12
      Originally posted by birdie View Post
      Linuxes have no AV at all, and to be honest I've never noticed my Windows 10 slowing down randomly in games because both Windows Defender and all other AVs have long learned to detect full screen applications running and they normally stop any background scanning when you're gaming.
      i m not sure if you are serious or not.
      i won t defend yhe fact that linux distro have no standard enabled AV. you still can install clamav for instance.
      but on windows,i m a "bad user" i disable the AV because it s in my way: on a laptop, the cpu fan doesnt stop spinning,it s loud, i like silent computing. the battery life gets awful, and with only realtime scan (not even full hd scan) i feel the performance drop on productivity applications! just by opening programs or files, it s just horrible.
      this on latest gen cpus...




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      • #13
        Originally posted by Anux View Post

        Start up your Win desktop and than try to start a programm, atleast 10 sec till you can even open the start menu and even after that the search is painfully slow.
        Real drama .

        Most users uses laptops and just system sleep, so their Windows runs weeks without restart or system on/off.

        On desktop many users uses also sleep/hibernate (eg. I and everyone who I know). Some users off/on their computer and waiting a few second more is real life drama .

        Only linux fans wonders this kind of problem.

        0 sec till you can even open the start
        Maybe on old, slow SSD. On cheap NVME like Kingston kc2500 like mine it's not true. You can start programs immediately.

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        • #14
          Originally posted by birdie View Post
          My Fedora 36 system gets roughly 100-200 updates monthly, while Windows updates just once a month and does so only when rebooting the system, so this (down) time can be glossed over.

          Linuxes have no AV at all, and to be honest I've never noticed my Windows 10 slowing down randomly in games because both Windows Defender and all other AVs have long learned to detect full screen applications running and they normally stop any background scanning when you're gaming.
          Linux has mandatory access control with a similar performance hit and activity.

          Defender is absolutely terrible with system-wide performance drops on Windows 11. Day-and-night difference as soon as I disable real-time scanning on relatively high-end hardware (1TB NVMe, 32GB RAM, 3060, 2700X). Whether or not that's a problem depends on if you know how your system performs without it. Game FPS is fine; it's disk I/O that gets slaughtered.

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          • #15
            It is just lacking WSL1/2 benchmark to show up how Windows is the best Desktop OS ever...

            On every place (blogs, podcasts, tech-journals) I observe this hidden arm wrestling between RH & M$, I hope any of you get enough money to cover this shame...

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            • #16
              Originally posted by Espionage724 View Post

              Linux has mandatory access control with a similar performance hit and activity.

              Defender is absolutely terrible with system-wide performance drops on Windows 11. Day-and-night difference as soon as I disable real-time scanning on relatively high-end hardware (1TB NVMe, 32GB RAM, 3060, 2700X). Whether or not that's a problem depends on if you know how your system performs without it. Game FPS is fine; it's disk I/O that gets slaughtered.
              It's disgusting to see so much anecdotal evidence without any fucking proofs of Defender being "absolutely terrible with system-wide performance". Tons of people around me have been running Defender for years on multiple PC with CPUs as old as Pentium based on Sandy Bridge and I have yet to hear a single testimonial about any perceptivable slow downs. Must be something specific to Linux users who happen to have such issues.

              Let me give you this wonderful document which was authored by a company which tests AVs professionally:

              https://www.av-comparatives.org/test...st-april-2022/

              You may notice that Windows Defender fares among the worst (yeah, surprisingly I prefer to be unbiased) in the following categories: File Copying First Run and Installing Applications. That's it. Now, how often do people copy [thousands of smaller] files or install applications? Quite rarely nowadays. In terms of copying large files or even images produced by your smartphone, there's next to no difference. JPEGs are not binaries worth checking.

              Why is it that any time you say a single word in defence of Windows on Linux/Unix related resources, instantly pop up people who have "unsurmountable" issues with Windows? Why the hell do I never meet such people in real life? Just recently people have actually lied through their teeth here on Phoronix about the DLL hell on Windows - the issue which was fully resolved with Windows Vista, i.e. over 15 years ago. Why is it that I've been running Windows 10 for over seven years in a row now with no issues at all and no reinstallations as well?

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              • #17
                Originally posted by birdie View Post

                It's disgusting to see so much anecdotal evidence without any fucking proofs of Defender being "absolutely terrible with system-wide performance". Tons of people around me have been running Defender for years on multiple PC with CPUs as old as Pentium based on Sandy Bridge and I have yet to hear a single testimonial about any perceptivable slow downs. Must be something specific to Linux users who happen to have such issues.
                It's only noticeable once you notice it being an issue. I turn off Defender real-time and notice improvement on application load speed. The difference in my case in a specific example is installing 7zip taking half a second vs almost 2 seconds. I'm well aware of how trivial that sounds, but I do multiple reinstalls a week sometimes and this load difference appears everywhere when redeploying software and backups.

                I'm not exaggerating with it being "absolutely terrible". It's absolutely terrible for me to see my hardware be bogged down visibly from protection I don't need. Others can tolerate it fine, and most are even blissfully unaware of the performance hit since they don't have a baseline for it off.

                Originally posted by birdie View Post
                Let me give you this wonderful document which was authored by a company which tests AVs professionally:

                https://www.av-comparatives.org/test...st-april-2022/

                You may notice that Windows Defender fares among the worst (yeah, surprisingly I prefer to be unbiased) in the following categories: File Copying First Run and Installing Applications. That's it. Now, how often do people copy [thousands of smaller] files or install applications? Quite rarely nowadays. In terms of copying large files or even images produced by your smartphone, there's next to no difference. JPEGs are not binaries worth checking.
                I don't care what others do. I know my OS ordeals are beyond the average user. In my use, Defender's real-time scan has a notable performance hit, and it's noticeable enough for me to disable it. My usage of Windows is limited enough to comfortably run it without Defender, so this is free performance.

                By-comparison, SELinux on Fedora has a performance hit as well. My usage on Linux is more broad though, so I keep it enabled.

                There's this too: https://www.techpowerup.com/295877/w...e-have-the-fix
                Last edited by Guest; 03 August 2022, 03:29 PM.

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                • #18
                  Originally posted by HEL88 View Post



                  Maybe in some benchmark. But 99% users doesn't care. Programs runs good.
                  The Internet is one of the most popular things to access and use on a computer. The browser benchmarks are the most important of all these benchmarks. Here are the results:

                  Speedometer: Clear Linux is 24.2% faster than windows11

                  JetStream 2: Clear Linux is 15% faster than windows11

                  CanvasMark: Clear Linux is 151% faster than windows11

                  Kraken: Clear Linux is +- 10% faster than windows11

                  Octane: Clear Linux is 12.1% faster than windows11

                  WASM imageConvolute: Clear Linux is +- 10% faster than windows11

                  Windows is also the most susceptible of all systems to cryptominers and other malware. So after a few months you can say that people who frequently use windows can already reinstall their system if they want to get the results that Michael gets.

                  Second, as hardware becomes obsolete, we see the gap in performance between Windows and Linux/BSD systems widening. So that's also something to keep in mind. If Clear Linux is 10% faster today, this usually means that Clear Linux will often be >35% faster on average in 10 years.

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                  • #19
                    Originally posted by HEL88 View Post


                    Maybe in some benchmark. But 99% users doesn't care. Programs runs good.
                    It's more visible with more CPU cores and more complex workloads, but it doesn't affect typical users as much.

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                    • #20
                      Typo:

                      Originally posted by phoronix View Post
                      Moving to more CPu/system-focused workloads,

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