Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Intel Core i7 1280P Windows 11 vs. Ubuntu vs. Clear Linux Performance

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Intel Core i7 1280P Windows 11 vs. Ubuntu vs. Clear Linux Performance

    Phoronix: Intel Core i7 1280P Windows 11 vs. Ubuntu vs. Clear Linux Performance

    After recently looking at the AMD Rembrandt Windows 11 vs. Linux performance using the new Ryzen 7 PRO 6850U laptop SoC, you may be wondering about the latest Windows vs. Linux performance over on the Intel side with their latest "Alder Lake P" wares. If so, today's benchmarks are for you with putting the Core i7 1280P on Windows 11 up against Ubuntu 22.04 LTS and Intel's own Clear Linux platform.

    https://www.phoronix.com/review/inte...-windows-linux

  • #2
    Windows as always not bad - faster than Ubuntu.

    And you can see how Linux fans lie by saying that Windows is a turtle compared to Linux.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by HEL88 View Post
      Windows as always not bad - faster than Ubuntu.

      And you can see how Linux fans lie by saying that Windows is a turtle compared to Linux.
      It's just you who have no clue what we're talking about. Ubuntu is far from optimal configuration and it still usually beats Windows. With I/O, file system benchmarks Windows is not even a turtle, it's snail.

      Comment


      • #4
        I bet a big part of Windows beeing unusually fast is the powersave governor on Linux. Maybe the power distribution between CPU and GPU is also worse in Linux and therefore the better gaming results.

        If I compare my arch + xfce with a stripped down Win 10 (all dataleaking deactivated or blocked and clean autostart) the difference is minimal but that is on fast enough hardware. But pray that Windows doesn't decide to do updates or virus scanning while you want a smooth gaming experience.

        Also many Linux programms are just much more efficient. Updating my whole arch after a month takes 2 - 3 min. (updating package database, download and install of a few GB) while windows in the same time is still searching for new updates and needs a good hour to do essentially the same and also taking extra time on shutdown and start afterwards.
        Or start the xfce-terminal and compare that to a powershell start, I regulary start 5 instances of the powershell because I think that it does not start till it decides to react to my interactions. And seeing the powershell does not mean its ready to use, the next waiting for a prompt is there for you.

        But I guess someone that never used Linux thinks all this strange behavior and waiting in Windows is normal or even fast.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Anux View Post
          I bet a big part of Windows beeing unusually fast is the powersave governor on Linux. Maybe the power distribution between CPU and GPU is also worse in Linux and therefore the better gaming results.

          If I compare my arch + xfce with a stripped down Win 10 (all dataleaking deactivated or blocked and clean autostart) the difference is minimal but that is on fast enough hardware. But pray that Windows doesn't decide to do updates or virus scanning while you want a smooth gaming experience.

          Also many Linux programms are just much more efficient. Updating my whole arch after a month takes 2 - 3 min. (updating package database, download and install of a few GB) while windows in the same time is still searching for new updates and needs a good hour to do essentially the same and also taking extra time on shutdown and start afterwards.
          Or start the xfce-terminal and compare that to a powershell start, I regulary start 5 instances of the powershell because I think that it does not start till it decides to react to my interactions. And seeing the powershell does not mean its ready to use, the next waiting for a prompt is there for you.

          But I guess someone that never used Linux thinks all this strange behavior and waiting in Windows is normal or even fast.
          First off, let's address the powersave governor in Linux. I don't know a single distro which enables it by default. Absolute most use `ondemand` or `schedutil`. What Linux lacks however is proper support for Intel Thread Director. If I'm not mistaken the kernel has learned to recognize P/E cores recently but there's no userspace application to shuffle tasks between cores yet, and it's sorely needed.

          The systems are wildly different in how they approach things so it's hard to say which one is faster/better.

          My Fedora 36 system gets roughly 100-200 updates monthly, while Windows updates just once a month and does so only when rebooting the system, so this (down) time can be glossed over.

          Linuxes have no AV at all, and to be honest I've never noticed my Windows 10 slowing down randomly in games because both Windows Defender and all other AVs have long learned to detect full screen applications running and they normally stop any background scanning when you're gaming.

          Powershell vs Linux graphical terminals? The latter are barebone and only run your shell (normally bash) which is a simple enough C application. Power Shell is a rich programming environment which features thousands of calls. cmd.exe which closely mimics Linux graphical emulators + simple shells starts in a split second.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Volta View Post
            With I/O, file system benchmarks Windows is not even a turtle, it's snail.


            Maybe in some benchmark. But 99% users doesn't care. Programs runs good.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by HEL88 View Post



              Maybe in some benchmark. But 99% users doesn't care. Programs runs good.
              Windows is slow with thousands of small files but that's not the problem of Windows or NTFS it's I guess because Windows ACL is far more advanced and richer than what Linux offers out of the box (standard Unix user/group/other permissions), secondly Windows logs to many different journals and has many features. How often do normal users deal with thousands of small files? Barely ever. Lastly, NTFS on SSD is quite snappy and most people have stopped using spinning rust for their system disk a long time ago.

              Comment


              • #8
                Most users have no understanding of what kind of filesystem performance should be acceptable. If they notice something takes a long time, they blame the ENTIRE computer. "My computer is slow".

                What I got from the benchmarks is that Linux is missing some graphics optimizations, but otherwise is more optimized.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by birdie View Post
                  First off, let's address the powersave governor in Linux. I don't know a single distro which enables it by default.
                  If you read the article bevor answering you would know at least 2.

                  The systems are wildly different in how they approach things so it's hard to say which one is faster/better.
                  No its pretty easy if you requlary use both.

                  while Windows updates just once a month and does so only when rebooting the system, so this (down) time can be glossed over
                  What magic registry tuning did you do to achive this? I searched for years of ways to get the updates and av scanning out of my way and in the end capitulated.

                  Linuxes have no AV at all
                  There are many Linux AV scanners, but yeah whats the point of using those?

                  and to be honest I've never noticed my Windows 10 slowing down randomly in games
                  Than you have probably a super fast high end PC for a few 1000 $ ?
                  because both Windows Defender and all other AVs have long learned to detect full screen applications running and they normally stop any background scanning when you're gaming.
                  Yes I read about that in the early Win 10 days, but somehow my Windows diddn't read those articles and the taskmanager also doesn't hide the fact that my game stutters because of Windows updates. Once Windows has done its deed everything runs smooth again. There is also nothing else installed apart from Windows and games. Even drivers are installed without their installer, just manual install in devmgmt no bloat.

                  Powershell vs Linux graphical terminals? The latter are barebone and only run your shell (normally bash) which is a simple enough C application. Power Shell is a rich programming environment which features thousands of calls. cmd.exe which closely mimics Linux graphical emulators + simple shells starts in a split second.
                  I don't care for the reasons any more, its the same with basically anything:
                  Start up your Win desktop and than try to start a programm, atleast 10 sec till you can even open the start menu and even after that the search is painfully slow. Or Windows settings showing you an empty window for a few sec. I know you probably come with an excuse for everything ^_^
                  But comparing cmd to a linux shell and criticizing me for comparing it to powershell is kinda funny.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    From the article itself:

                    Code:
                    Windows 11: CPU Microcode: 0000000014040000-
                    Ubuntu 22.04 + Linux 5.18: Scaling Governor: intel_pstate powersave (EPP: balance_performance) - CPU Microcode: 0x41c - Thermald 2.4.9-
                    Clear Linux 36580: Scaling Governor: intel_pstate powersave (EPP: balance_performance) - CPU Microcode: 0x41c - Thermald 2.4.9
                    To be fair, the pts tool always notifies you about this before running it. I have run benchmarks with performance and with powersave.

                    Comment

                    Working...
                    X