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Mesa 22.2 Is Ready With Broader Support For Intel Arc Graphics GPUs

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  • Mesa 22.2 Is Ready With Broader Support For Intel Arc Graphics GPUs

    Phoronix: Mesa 22.2 Is Ready With Broader Support For Intel Arc Graphics GPUs

    Mesa 22.2 is about to be branched and enter its feature freeze while fortunately expanded Intel Arc Graphics DG2/Alchemist support has made it in time! Remaining DG2/Alchemist PCI IDs are now enabled for Mesa 22.2 and intended to function with Linux 5.20+ for Intel's forthcoming desktop graphics cards...

    https://www.phoronix.com/news/Mesa-22.2-Intel-DG2-Ready

  • #2
    Not having the smallBAR support sorted out could also explain some of the problems reviewers noticed on Windows without largeBAR support.

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    • #3
      I have seen in a place or two, that Intel sucks with DX9, DX10, DX11.
      Which puts Intel into interesting position with Linux.
      Since Linux is using Vulkan for said API. Could it be that Intel uniquely be a good deal for Linux gamers? I assume their Vulkan implementation is actually any good/performant/stable.
      I can't wait to see Linux benchmarks .

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      • #4
        Originally posted by dimko View Post
        Since Linux is using Vulkan for said API. Could it be that Intel uniquely be a good deal for Linux gamers?
        I don't think Intel ANV compatibility and performance with DXVK/VKD3D-Proton is anywhere near RADV/Nvidia. It's safe to assume Intel devs will be busy with lots of important basic stuff for quite some time, so I wouldn't expect DXVK/VKD3D-Proton experience to become really good with Intel any time soon. Whether it's worse than their Windows driver? Hard to say...

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        • #5
          Originally posted by aufkrawall View Post
          I don't think Intel ANV compatibility and performance with DXVK/VKD3D-Proton is anywhere near RADV/Nvidia. It's safe to assume Intel devs will be busy with lots of important basic stuff for quite some time, so I wouldn't expect DXVK/VKD3D-Proton experience to become really good with Intel any time soon. Whether it's worse than their Windows driver? Hard to say...
          At least according to the official DXVK driver requirements page, Intel's ANV Vulkan driver should already be supported:

          The following Linux drivers are supported:
          AMD (RADV) 22.0 22.0
          Nvidia 510.47.03 515.49.06 (beta)
          Intel (ANV) 22.0 22.0
          https://github.com/doitsujin/dxvk/wiki/Driver-support

          If I were Intel, I'd get an Arc GPU into Phoronix' possession ASAP!

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Linuxxx View Post
            At least according to the official DXVK driver requirements page, Intel's ANV Vulkan driver should already be supported:
            It's less of a question that wrappers support drivers, but the other way round.
            If drivers are bug infested, wrappers can't do much about it. Tried various titles on a gen 12 IGP with ANV in Proton a few months ago and it was just a disaster.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by aufkrawall View Post
              It's less of a question that wrappers support drivers, but the other way round.
              If drivers are bug infested, wrappers can't do much about it. Tried various titles on a gen 12 IGP with ANV in Proton a few months ago and it was just a disaster.
              Yeah, but isnt the whole point of Vulkan is to be as close to hardware as possible? As long as Vulkan calls are functioning as expected, translation of Vulkan to Zinc or DX9-12 should be as good as is on AMD/Nvidia, since DX calls are software thing for proton/DXVK, not in any shape or fashion hardware.
              Frankly, I don't expect much from on CPU GPU much.
              With that said, I am worried about state of Vulkan driver Intel may roll out. May be you are right and driver for Vulkan functionality sucks and blows.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by dimko View Post

                Yeah, but isnt the whole point of Vulkan is to be as close to hardware as possible? As long as Vulkan calls are functioning as expected, translation of Vulkan to Zinc or DX9-12 should be as good as is on AMD/Nvidia, since DX calls are software thing for proton/DXVK, not in any shape or fashion hardware.
                It's never that simple. Try to enable Zink on a new GPU and you'll run into a bunch of issues to fix first.

                That said, anv is part of Mesa and shares a lot of common code with radv so it should be relatively simple compared to a 3rd party driver that hasn't been looked at yet.

                I expect intel's linux drivers to be fairly competitive overall, at least in Vulkan, you just have to expect some rough spots in a 1st generation product.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by smitty3268 View Post

                  I expect intel's linux drivers to be fairly competitive overall, at least in Vulkan, you just have to expect some rough spots in a 1st generation product.
                  My point is, if Vulkan is in fairly good shape, than Proton will likely work well. So compared to dx9-12 support on doze that is part of driver, we alreadt know - already chokes on balls on doze, Linux users may have better experience compared to doze ones, since DX9-12 is basically emulated and directly depends on Vulkan performance on Linux.

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                  • #10
                    For any one interested in ARC.
                    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DH2s5HeZzs8

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