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Intel Arc A380 Desktop Graphics Launch In China

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  • pinguinpc
    replied


    So beautifull around 150us for 6gb card meanwhile amd offer 4gb in rx 6400 at 160us, 4gb too in rx 6500 at around 200us and nvidia offer 4gb on gtx 1050ti (outdated product) around 180us, 4gb on gtx 1650 around 200us, also outdated product

    on media capabilities offer 150us for AV1-H265-VP9-H264 decode and encode capabilities meanwhile rx 6400/6500 dont offer any encode capabilities and dont decode AV1 and gtx 1050/1650 (outdated products) only offer H265-H264 encode capabilities and dont decode AV1 again outdated product

    personally consider this a huge step for improve actual gpu situation and stay prepare some bucks to help intel (i stay very interested on arc a310) and punish amd (cutted laptop products like rx 6400/6500, few vram and very expensive) and nvidia (outdated and expensive products)

    in my case use linux mainly, dont care newer games, dont care raytracing, dont care scalers but stay very interested on av1 encode hardware

    Last edited by pinguinpc; 15 June 2022, 04:32 PM.

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  • smitty3268
    replied
    Originally posted by dc_coder_84 View Post
    What means "VP9 Bitstream" on this page?
    In practice, it just means it has hardware decoding for VP9 video.

    I think they copy and pasted the name of the relevant spec that Google published: "VP9 Bitstream & Decoding Process Specification"

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  • oiaohm
    replied
    Originally posted by brucethemoose View Post
    That being said, the AV1 block on those Arc cards makes them particularly useful for media work. It would be even better to have in an IGP.
    The arc is faster than the Intel igp as AV1 processing and other things. Being a specialist made GPU gives it bigger silicon for this logic and more cooling area.

    Originally posted by brucethemoose View Post
    Assuming they work on the linux desktop, the compute workloads where you'd even want an IGP + 1 or 2 dGPUs are really esoteric. Usually a single bigger dGPU would be a better option, though you can save some VRAM by running the desktop on the IGP or the unused dGPU.
    There was a time frame where you had igpu, dgpu and media accelerator as a common combination in desktop systems. This combination still exists in server builds.

    Linux server workloads handling video work is not uncommon to have a igp/apu, dgpu and a media accelerator. So igp/apu + 2 dgpu is not off the cards if one of those cards is good at compute or media acceleration but not exactly good at normal 3d graphics. Of course being GPU equals extra problems on the OS side with vendors drivers need to play well with each other.

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  • oiaohm
    replied
    Originally posted by Ladis View Post
    If you don't know how to make it running, hire an expert. People, who need it, use it for decades.
    Fun part is that is not even simple for experts. You have brand and firmware version issues with cards that means it does not always work. People who need it have normally been restricted to only aligning 2 vendors. As in intel igpu+amd or Intel igpu+Nvidia or amd vpu+Nvidia.

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  • WannaBeOCer
    replied
    People crapping on Intel yet they’ve had the GPU market lead for years thanks to their iGPUs which was at 62% at the end of 2021. People keep forgetting Raja Koduri created AMD’s RDNA. It won’t be long till Intel is competing with Nvidia and AMD.

    Seems like they’re the only component company to make a proper GUI to manage display settings for Windows. AMD’s is confusing due to all their sub menus. Nvidia’s control panel is slow and sluggish. While Intel’s Command Center is elegant and easy to use.

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  • pWe00Iri3e7Z9lHOX2Qx
    replied
    Originally posted by johanb View Post
    $150 USD sounds like great value for the money, I wonder what it will cost in the EU and US.
    Especially if it is a single slot solely bus powered card. That niche of a small card that can work in systems with very low end power supplies has been mostly forgotten about for years. Used Nvidia Quadro P2000 cards still go for nearly $300. The slightly updated P2200 cards are closer to $400.

    I need 3x 1440p class cards, but I also need several 1080p cards. I expect these first gen Intel cards to be a bit underwhelming and the drivers to be immature. I also expect those factors to influence street prices, assuming they don't stay OEM only.

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  • dc_coder_84
    replied
    What means "VP9 Bitstream" on this page?

    Leave a comment:


  • brucethemoose
    replied
    Originally posted by oiaohm View Post
    https://www.intel.com.au/content/www...ative-pro.html
    Depends on what you are doing serous-ally. There are applications designed for Intel based GPUs to perform the best.

    AM5 where it will have integrated APU in basically all CPUs from AMD on AM5. This could create a true hybrid beast system where you have you 16 lanes for GPU split in 2 so 8x pci5.0 for a Nvidia and 8x pci 5.0 for a Intel and AMD gpu in the cpu as one mix. Of course intel you have the reverse as well.

    Of course this brings it own set of problems for OS designs because we could be going into a time frame of systems with multi vendor GPU setups as the normal..
    For gaming? We've had hybrid AMD APU setups in laptops before... trust me, you don't want to go back to that.

    Assuming they work on the linux desktop, the compute workloads where you'd even want an IGP + 1 or 2 dGPUs are really esoteric. Usually a single bigger dGPU would be a better option, though you can save some VRAM by running the desktop on the IGP or the unused dGPU.


    That being said, the AV1 block on those Arc cards makes them particularly useful for media work. It would be even better to have in an IGP.
    Last edited by brucethemoose; 15 June 2022, 10:19 AM.

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  • Ladis
    replied
    Originally posted by oiaohm View Post

    Ladis basically multi GPU systems have not been the normal and it they work they are if you are lucky. Possible but not dependable to work. If we go into mutli GPU as the normal this has to change.
    If you don't know how to make it running, hire an expert. People, who need it, use it for decades.

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  • oiaohm
    replied
    Originally posted by Ladis View Post
    Such systems were here for decades. Windows has support for that, from at least XP.
    It is as Misel says.
    Originally posted by Misel View Post
    Multi-Vendor GPU systems were always possible with this and later Windows versions, sometimes it was a bit sketchy though.
    Yes Multi GPU setups have been possible with Windows and Linux for quite some time. But they have not been the normal. If they don't work perfectly out the box and the user or ODM has to do some hacking around so they do this has still been acceptable in recent times.

    Windows systems come with an Integrated Graphics Card. While it is sufficient for basic use if might not suffice for those who wish to play games use use


    You have to love the final solution with Windows 10 when you are trying to using Intel/Nvidia hybrid here. That right disable the Intel and only use the Nvidia. Not how to make it work but to give up on it ever working.

    Ladis basically multi GPU systems have not been the normal and it they work they are if you are lucky. Possible but not dependable to work. If we go into mutli GPU as the normal this has to change.

    Leave a comment:

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