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Intel Media Driver Adding Vulkan Video Acceleration Support

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  • Quackdoc
    replied
    Originally posted by arQon View Post
    Nah, they really aren't. They WILL be, sure (well, AV1 will: VP9 is likely to be superceded before it's even implemented in a lot of cases), but they absolutely aren't TODAY.
    Again, Netflix, and Yt, which accounts for almost half of streaming service traffic alone, both use vp9 and even more services are distributing av1. most phones since like 2017 have vp9 blocks on them at least, and same with most semi decent TVs, as only a single 2016 smart tv I have personally seen lacks it, though im sure there are more ofc, thats not my point. most new devices are shipping, or will be shipping with av1 blocks on them, qualcomm is finally starting to make devices with it and it's considered late to the game.

    that is no small amount of vp9 traffic, that would be, and pardon my language, a shit ton of traffic. and a lot of use for vp9. and it is a lot of use for AV1 as I have said, nearly every streaming service is trying to migrate to it

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  • arQon
    replied
    Originally posted by Quackdoc View Post
    streaming ... primarily dominated by vp9
    Your point about VP9 volume is absolutely fair, but what I was getting at is that more than half of it comes from a single site, i.e. YT, and the rest from just a handful of other sites. What I should have said was "BREADTH of adoption", but I just got off a 12-hour flight so...
    Almost every phone and TV made in the last 6 years or so has an HEVC block. Very few have VP9, and either "almost-" or "literally-" none have AV1. It's not about torrents, it's about the client devices. There's more to the world than just PCs with discrete GPUs.

    > VP9 and AV1 are quite important

    Nah, they really aren't. They WILL be, sure (well, AV1 will: VP9 is likely to be superceded before it's even implemented in a lot of cases), but they absolutely aren't TODAY.

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  • Quackdoc
    replied
    Originally posted by arQon View Post

    HEVC has massive adoption and hardware support, VP9 has minimal adoption, and AV1 has absolutely none of either. So yeah, I think "surprising" isn't really the word you were looking for there.
    what? streaming is second only to cable in terms of media consumption in march. 30% of traffic. which is primarily dominated by vp9 and pushing towards av1, with HEVC being used often for 4k so it's certainly up there. but to say vp9 has minimal adoption and av1 has none is absolutely false. considering A-Prime, YT, and netflix, 3/4 largest players are all actively distributing av1 content, and hulu, is part of AOM (no idea if they actively push av1).

    maybe on your torrent trackers vp9 and av1 are next to non existent. but in the big boy world where there is money to be made, VP9 and AV1 are quite important

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  • arQon
    replied
    Originally posted by shmerl View Post
    Surprising HEVC was pushed into the spec before AV1 and VP9.
    HEVC has massive adoption and hardware support, VP9 has minimal adoption, and AV1 has absolutely none of either. So yeah, I think "surprising" isn't really the word you were looking for there.

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  • binarybanana
    replied
    I still prefer the older intel-vaapi-driver. This new Intel Media Driver is bloated (triple digits MB sized .so) and comes with DRM (digital restrictions management) support. The first I can live with, but the latter is non-negotiable.

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  • Quackdoc
    replied
    Originally posted by piotrj3 View Post
    Generally i just wish that this vulkan video will be supported enough and will be adopted enough to get platform agnostic video acceleration, so Linux users can benefit from work done primarly for windows.
    I think a libva backend could be enough honestly, then apps that need it can use it as they wish. games that still use vulkan video will certainly benefit. but im not sure if arm devices would benefit from it all that much.

    related, one of the discords I am in for a video editor briefly talked about vulkan video for decode acceleration. could be a neat usecase too.

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  • piotrj3
    replied
    Generally i just wish that this vulkan video will be supported enough and will be adopted enough to get platform agnostic video acceleration, so Linux users can benefit from work done primarly for windows.

    Leave a comment:


  • Danny3
    replied
    Originally posted by MetalGearDaner View Post
    This is great news. Although applications have to support it as well. It would be great if Firefox and VLC support Vulkan Video API!
    Indeed, Firefox and VLC support for this would really nice!
    And I would want Kodi support for this too!

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  • MetalGearDaner
    replied
    This is great news. Although applications have to support it as well. It would be great if Firefox and VLC support Vulkan Video API!

    Leave a comment:


  • microcode
    replied
    Originally posted by Danny3 View Post
    There are lots of movies (in the hundreds or thousands) out there in HEVC format.
    Some of them are even 10bit and some even HDR on top of HEVC.
    I mean content that you might actually play on a PC. VP9 is by far more common, even if you ignore YouTube (which is the majority of video streaming), and is equally efficient.

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