Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Intel Alder Lake Users On Ubuntu 22.04 LTS Will Want To Switch To A Newer Kernel

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • user1
    replied
    Originally posted by Vistaus View Post

    You're the first one ever who complains about openSUSE Tumbleweed. No one has ever complained before about it breaking.
    I didn't complain about Tumbleweed specifically. In fact, I think it's actually the best one out of all rolling release distros. Especially miles better than all the Arch based ones (This may sound unpopular, but I have a low opinion about Arch based distros and Arch itself).

    Leave a comment:


  • elatllat
    replied
    IMO it's good Ubuntu is using a LTS kernel by default... there are HWE and mainline builds for those wanting them;

    https://kernel.ubuntu.com/~kernel-ppa/mainline/

    Leave a comment:


  • Vistaus
    replied
    Originally posted by user1 View Post

    Except not everyone will want to suffer from the high probability of breakages in rolling release distros. Imo, of all distros, Fedora has the best balance of up to date packages and stability.
    You're the first one ever who complains about openSUSE Tumbleweed. No one has ever complained before about it breaking.

    Leave a comment:


  • Volta
    replied
    Nothing new. Ubuntu server spin powdered to look like a desktop distribution. And it's not only about the Kernel, but its config as well.

    Leave a comment:


  • Raka555
    replied
    Originally posted by user1 View Post

    Except not everyone will want to suffer from the high probability of breakages in rolling release distros. Imo, of all distros, Fedora has the best balance of up to date packages and stability.
    When I got my shiny new 3700x back in 2019 (I think), OpenSUSE Tumbleweed was the only distro that worked on the machine.
    I usually use Ubuntu LTS releases because I like stability. These days I don't want to compile and patch kernels and things anymore. It must just work.
    If there are some performance left on the table, so be it.

    However, I stuck with OpenSUSE Tumbleweed on that machine and so far it has never broke after any of the updates.
    On the negative side: It does feel slower than other dstro's. Especially when booting up. (Solus felt very snappy on this machine)
    The huge amount of updates is also something that I am not very fond of.

    It beats me how people can manage to break Ubuntu to the point where they have to restore from backups ...
    Only update issues I ever had with Ubuntu (been using it for 12+ years) was related to nVidia drivers. For that reason, I would never buy a laptop with discrete GPU ever again.
    Last edited by Raka555; 14 April 2022, 11:30 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • yossarianuk
    replied
    Originally posted by andre30correia View Post

    they have point realeases and upgrade kernel and gpu stack, the non free is upgrading always since at least 4 years ago.

    If people need the last kernel they have pre build ones, i dont see the problem here, the same happens with windows if we need the last drivers we need to upgrade or use tools for that, the ones in windoes upgrade are always out dated, rolling distros even if some people says no, they have many problems after some time
    Well yes you get HWE after 6/12 months (you have to manually enable them though if you install an LTS on the first release and many uses are not aware) , but the point here is that 5.15 is now old and missing many features (many that help AMD CPU and Ryzen users ) , other distros (even ones based on Ubuntu) give you the latest (or at least the option to..) .

    As well as making AMD users CPUs not perform as well (by sticking with 5.15, which may make some windows users who try Ubuntu as their first time trying Linux think that Linux is slower than it should be..) Also anyone who plays any games with Proton (i.e the majority of games on Steam) will be missing out on FUTEX2’s sys_futex_waitv() system call that was added to kernel 5.16.

    If you buy a brand new laptop there is a chance some hardware will not work out of the box with older kernels also. Really a good desktop distro should have latest kernel/mesa otherwise IMO.

    This article also shows the same thing ...
    Last edited by yossarianuk; 14 April 2022, 11:16 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • andre30correia
    replied
    Originally posted by yossarianuk View Post
    The lack of latest kernel/mesa/nvidia drivers (out the box) is the reason I do not recommend Ubuntu as a desktop distro, this is what makes PopOS a better choice.

    (Not that i personally run PopOS ..)
    they have point realeases and upgrade kernel and gpu stack, the non free is upgrading always since at least 4 years ago.

    If people need the last kernel they have pre build ones, i dont see the problem here, the same happens with windows if we need the last drivers we need to upgrade or use tools for that, the ones in windoes upgrade are always out dated, rolling distros even if some people says no, they have many problems after some time

    Leave a comment:


  • yossarianuk
    replied
    The lack of latest kernel/mesa/nvidia drivers (out the box) is the reason I do not recommend Ubuntu as a desktop distro, this is what makes PopOS a better choice.

    (Not that i personally run PopOS ..)

    Leave a comment:


  • bobbie424242
    replied
    Originally posted by user1 View Post

    That's fair, but different people might have different experiences, depending on what packages they use, their hardware, etc. Also, I didn't mean breakage in a sense of distro not booting after an update, but also in a sense of a package/app starting to have issues/buggy behavior after an update.
    I get what you mean, and I can understand people not being comfortable with regularly updating a rolling distro. Packages or functionality breakage can happen occasionally on openSUSE TW, in which case it's still possible to rollback to the previous working snapshot if there is no other work-around. On openSUSE TW, you can update the distro several months apart if you want to (or any granularity that works best for you), instead of upgrading to a snapshot as soon as it is available.
    Still I would recommend a rolling distro to anyone having recent hardware and not totally a newcomer to Linux.
    After 3 years of using a rolling distro, I cannot imagine anything else now, and (for my use) it made obsolete the usual distro release model with a new full blown release every 6 months or year (or even more). At the time these distros are released, some of the software is already old.
    Last edited by bobbie424242; 14 April 2022, 09:14 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • user1
    replied
    Originally posted by bobbie424242 View Post

    3 years of openSUSE Tumbleweed now with countless updates on my workhorse Thinkpad and it did not break. If it does, I can revert to the previous snapshot from GRUB.
    That's fair, but different people might have different experiences, depending on what packages they use, their hardware, etc. Also, I didn't mean breakage in a sense of distro not booting after an update, but also in a sense of a package/app starting to have issues/buggy behavior after an update.

    Leave a comment:

Working...
X