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Intel Posts Updated "Software Defined Silicon" Driver To Activate Licensed Hardware Features

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  • #21
    Originally posted by billyswong View Post
    I have never heard anyone interested in upgrading a CPU from lower tier to higher tier in the same generation, even if there is trade-in. The so called extra market opportunity is non-existent.
    History suggests otherwise. Amdahl did this with their 470V/5 and 470V/7 systems in the late 1970's, where the "variable-speed" feature (which enabled higher performance on-demand) turned out to be quite popular for some customers (even as some naysayers said it never would be).
    CommunityMember
    Senior Member
    Last edited by CommunityMember; 21 November 2021, 02:45 PM.

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    • #22
      Didn't AMD do a pretty close principle of function reduction when we had to use the pencil trick in order to get the entire use of that processor? I understand that was more hardware related but the idea isn't that different just shifting it to software.

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      • #23
        so next will see hacking the intel cpu license?

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        • #24
          Originally posted by RedEyed View Post
          Fuck you Intel.
          You showed them!

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          • #25
            Originally posted by loganj View Post
            so next will see hacking the intel cpu license?
            It seems likely that the devices with such feature licenses will be targeted towards the large (corporate) customers, who, even if the tech is eventually hacked, will respect the licensing of the devices they purchase (as potentially many many millions of dollars are at stake if you knowingly violate the license). While one can always find exceptions, large corporate customers are extremely likely to pay even for feature licenses which are only enforced on the honor system (the feature is there, you can use it, but you are supposed to pay because you are an honorable partner). Those corporations that are eventually found to have not paid for such honor system licenses are typically those that some low level employee either was not aware of, or did not happen to mention to management, that they needed a license, and just starting using the feature, and once identified that it should be licensed it is, as it is just the cost of doing business.

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            • #26
              Originally posted by CommunityMember View Post
              It seems likely that the devices with such feature licenses will be targeted towards the large (corporate) customers, who, even if the tech is eventually hacked, will respect the licensing of the devices they purchase (as potentially many many millions of dollars are at stake if you knowingly violate the license). While one can always find exceptions, large corporate customers are extremely likely to pay even for feature licenses which are only enforced on the honor system (the feature is there, you can use it, but you are supposed to pay because you are an honorable partner). Those corporations that are eventually found to have not paid for such honor system licenses are typically those that some low level employee either was not aware of, or did not happen to mention to management, that they needed a license, and just starting using the feature, and once identified that it should be licensed it is, as it is just the cost of doing business.
              While this might be true for corporate buyers, I have the secondary market in sight. I am also currently using a used Xeon for its incredible value. In the past you could overclock them, but as time went on Intel more and more locked the Xeons down, fortunately Haswell-EP has a bug where you can run all cores on its maximum turbo frequency with some BIOS modding. I can picture a vibrant used market with these Xeons somewhen in the future if similar hacks to unlock more CPU features existed. Also the secondary-market sellers and the primary customers would profit as demand would be better, providing some re-sell value to them instead of e-waste.

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              • #27
                Can't wait for the future where users can also "pirate" hardware, not just software.

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                • #28
                  Originally posted by hvis View Post
                  Can't wait for the future where users can also "pirate" hardware, not just software.
                  You'd still be pirating software - just a license, and it wouldn't work without already having the cpu.

                  To pirate hardware would require to either:
                  1 - basically steal it
                  2 - steal the design schematics and produce the hardware yourself, which you certainly won't be doing

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                  • #29
                    You'd still be pirating software - just a license, and it wouldn't work without already having the cpu.

                    To pirate hardware would require to either:
                    1 - basically steal it
                    2 - steal the design schematics and produce the hardware yourself, which you certainly won't be doing
                    I'm guessing the end destination of of this "feature enablement" stuff would be hardware subscriptions, where you get the device itself for little to no money and they pay the manufacturer for the subscription to be able to use it. Then we would come full circle, and it some point it will indeed be possible to "download a car". Or most of it.
                    hvis
                    Junior Member
                    Last edited by hvis; 21 November 2021, 05:01 PM.

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                    • #30
                      I wouldn't be so negative. The reality of price differentiated "products" for a lot of things with a high development cost is already so that it's all the same product, just disabled to a varying degree. At best, you can disable a defect non-vital part to improve yield. If the part wasn't defect, and you can unlock it later, then it doesn't go to waste.
                      andreano
                      Senior Member
                      Last edited by andreano; 21 November 2021, 05:09 PM.

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