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Intel Posts Updated "Software Defined Silicon" Driver To Activate Licensed Hardware Features

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  • #11
    Originally posted by atomsymbol View Post

    It is an interesting approach to enabling CPU features, but a problem is that there is a worldwide shortage of chip manufacturing capacities and the "Software Defined Silicon" can only worsen the situation because all CPUs with this capability will have to contain defect-free silicon (such as: AVX-512 units which are disabled by default and can be enabled via a license) that is turned off until the user activates the licenced hardware feature.

    Wikipedia: 2020-2021 global chip shortage
    This initiative does not render their other product market segmentation policies obsolete. Every defective chip still has to be sold as a lower tier product. As you pointed out, they can do this licensing option only with known good dies but on a mature process you essentially end up with a lot of good dies which at present need to be crippled artificially to meet the demand of the lower tier products. With this program Intel still can make some extra profit out of these known good chips and as long as the customer gets some value out of it, this could be a win-win for both sides.

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    • #12
      Originally posted by uid313 View Post
      I so happy that AMD exists.
      Thanks to AMD we got dual-core, 64-bit and virtualization, which we probably wouldn't get without AMD pushing it.
      Now if only AMD could push ECC on consumer desktop motherboards and laptops that would be great.
      And more than 4 cores on desktop, and more than 5% performance improvement every other year.

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      • #13
        Hey, why stop at asking people to pay to enable features that are already there

        They should create a feature where your cpu spontaneously crashes, and you have to pay a subscription to stop that anti-feature.

        The longer since the expiration of the anti-crash subscription, the more frequent the crashes. Maybe add a rising chance to brick the system while at it.

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        • #14
          Originally posted by uid313 View Post
          I so happy that AMD exists.
          Thanks to AMD we got dual-core, 64-bit and virtualization, which we probably wouldn't get without AMD pushing it.
          Now if only AMD could push ECC on consumer desktop motherboards and laptops that would be great.
          That happiness might not last. As amd's business situation is improving, its alleged love for consumers is dwindling.

          Amd is out there for the same reason as intel - to make money. They just haven't been in a position to afford to be as shitty as intel.

          But they might just get there. I mean... their CPU lineup has already diminished its value proposition to the level of intel cpus.

          They are selling 128 bit gpus at the prices of 256 bit from just a few generations back. Not the slightest hint of reluctance to capitalize on the chip shortage.

          Furthermore, amd is getting all cozy and comfy in bed with some of the most anti-user big tech companies out there, which also happen to be the most wealthy of all, to no coincidence. Amd is very eager to neglect the end users that got it through its decade of mediocrity and absence of competitiveness in order to cater to those "openly evil" mega corporations.

          I never really understood this "intel bad, amd good" saga, obviously, the underdog is not in a position to be as obnoxious as a dominant practical monopoly.
          Last edited by ddriver; 21 November 2021, 02:07 PM.

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          • #15
            Originally posted by ms178 View Post

            This initiative does not render their other product market segmentation policies obsolete. Every defective chip still has to be sold as a lower tier product. As you pointed out, they can do this licensing option only with known good dies but on a mature process you essentially end up with a lot of good dies which at present need to be crippled artificially to meet the demand of the lower tier products. With this program Intel still can make some extra profit out of these known good chips and as long as the customer gets some value out of it, this could be a win-win for both sides.
            I am not sure your computation is correct. Imagine the following future:
            • lower tier (defective or working AVX-512 unit): 100_000 units sold at price 100€
            • middle tier (working AVX-512 unit & AVX-512 license disabled) : 10_000 units sold at price 200€
            • high-end tier (working AVX-512 unit & AVX-512 license enabled): 1_000 units sold at price 300€
            Present (today, without "Software Defined Silicon" capability):
            • lower tier (defective or working AVX-512 unit): 105_000 units sold at price 110€
            • high-end tier (working AVX-512 unit): 5_000 units sold at price 250€
            The point is that 10_000 + 1_000 = 11_000, which is a larger number than 5_000.

            I am not claiming that the above computation is fully accurate - but I do claim that the above scenario is a real possibility. Thus, it is a real possibility that "Software Defined Silicon" will worsen chip shortage.

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            • #16
              Originally posted by ddriver View Post
              Because overpaying for the cpu is not enough. We really have to work on uprooting that vile concept of end user ownership. The end user is not supposed to own anything, the end user is supposed to be owned by big tech.
              This already happens in a limited way in the server space where the proprietary cloud vendors get first dibs on the new CPUs and your only option is to rent them and lock yourself into their ecosystem.

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              • #17
                Fuck you Intel.

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                • #18
                  Does this means that I will be able to use hyperthreading and/or quicksync on my celeron (quicksync is available on windows on my cpu but not on linux)?

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                  • #19
                    This is the same poison that Microsoft does in their Windows operativsystem.

                    If(os_edition==home) maxnr_cpus=1;

                    It is really about that stupid. Intel plans to do essentially the same with hardware. REDUCING features for no good reason except profit is not the right way.

                    ​​​​​​Heck now that the entire world is starting to look at thing such as right to repair, sustainability and all kinds of random more or less god intentioned nonsense/sane stuff - how can this even be suggested? Wake up!!!!


                    http://www.dirtcellar.net

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                    • #20
                      Originally posted by ms178 View Post

                      This initiative does not render their other product market segmentation policies obsolete. Every defective chip still has to be sold as a lower tier product. As you pointed out, they can do this licensing option only with known good dies but on a mature process you essentially end up with a lot of good dies which at present need to be crippled artificially to meet the demand of the lower tier products. With this program Intel still can make some extra profit out of these known good chips and as long as the customer gets some value out of it, this could be a win-win for both sides.
                      Unless they are going to present CPU buyers a chip lottery, CPU that can't be uncrippled need to be in a different model number of those that can be uncrippled.

                      I have never heard anyone interested in upgrading a CPU from lower tier to higher tier in the same generation, even if there is trade-in. The so called extra market opportunity is non-existent. It is only useful for paving the road of hardware subscription similar to what companies did to software license.

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