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Linux ITMT Patch Fixes Intel "Alder Lake" Hybrid Handling For Some Systems

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  • Linux ITMT Patch Fixes Intel "Alder Lake" Hybrid Handling For Some Systems

    Phoronix: Linux ITMT Patch Fixes Intel "Alder Lake" Hybrid Handling For Some Systems

    There is a patch pending that improves the Linux kernel's dealing with the hybrid P and E cores found with Intel's new Alder Lake processors that will benefit some systems/motherboards...

    Phoronix, Linux Hardware Reviews, Linux hardware benchmarks, Linux server benchmarks, Linux benchmarking, Desktop Linux, Linux performance, Open Source graphics, Linux How To, Ubuntu benchmarks, Ubuntu hardware, Phoronix Test Suite

  • #2
    While I'm rather surprised that Intel dropped the ball on Alder Lake Linux support, it's not like you can get DDR5 memory anyway:
    The latest hardware component to be affected by component shortage is DDR5 memory which is virtually out of stock across all major retailers.


    Not sure it would be worth going with an Alder Lake system with just DDR4. In theory, DDR5 should also be better for row hammer.

    Oh well, at least things are starting to improve for Alder Lake on Linux.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by hiryu View Post
      While I'm rather surprised that Intel dropped the ball on Alder Lake Linux support, it's not like you can get DDR5 memory anyway:
      https://wccftech.com/ddr5-memory-are...of-pmic-chips/

      Not sure it would be worth going with an Alder Lake system with just DDR4. In theory, DDR5 should also be better for row hammer.

      Oh well, at least things are starting to improve for Alder Lake on Linux.
      I have seen this opinion before. Why not go for DDR4, if DDR5 doesn't really make any difference? With all the money saved on the mobo and not having to buy new RAM sticks, I can certainly live with a little lower performance in the few scenarios I'm not likely to encounter at home.

      Edit: Also, nice to meet you Hiryu, I thought you were scuttled years ago

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by bug77 View Post

        I have seen this opinion before. Why not go for DDR4, if DDR5 doesn't really make any difference? With all the money saved on the mobo and not having to buy new RAM sticks, I can certainly live with a little lower performance in the few scenarios I'm not likely to encounter at home.

        Edit: Also, nice to meet you Hiryu, I thought you were scuttled years ago
        Took me a moment to realize you had made a WWII reference.

        If I'm going to spend the money and time to build a box, I don't want to half ass it. It seems that DDR5 does have some benefits beyond row hammer, but you're right that in most areas, it's not going to make much difference.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by hiryu View Post
          While I'm rather surprised that Intel dropped the ball on Alder Lake Linux support, it's not like you can get DDR5 memory anyway:
          The latest hardware component to be affected by component shortage is DDR5 memory which is virtually out of stock across all major retailers.


          Not sure it would be worth going with an Alder Lake system with just DDR4. In theory, DDR5 should also be better for row hammer.

          Oh well, at least things are starting to improve for Alder Lake on Linux.
          I agree. Alder Lake is not worth it without DDR5, and since DDR5 is scarce and expensive, Alder Lake is not worth it for most people anyway. By the time DDR5 availability and pricing becomes sane, Alder Lake's successor will be out anyway, and it may even include AVX512 again. Plus the early adopter issues with the schedulers will probably be a thing of the past by then.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by TemplarGR View Post

            I agree. Alder Lake is not worth it without DDR5, and since DDR5 is scarce and expensive, Alder Lake is not worth it for most people anyway. By the time DDR5 availability and pricing becomes sane, Alder Lake's successor will be out anyway, and it may even include AVX512 again. Plus the early adopter issues with the schedulers will probably be a thing of the past by then.
            This.

            Now that it looks like HEDT is a long ways out for Intel and AMD both... I may just go with the Ryzen refresh that's supposed to be out early 2022 to replace my aging 10980xe. At least I'll be able to get get memory for it.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by bug77 View Post

              I have seen this opinion before. Why not go for DDR4, if DDR5 doesn't really make any difference? With all the money saved on the mobo and not having to buy new RAM sticks, I can certainly live with a little lower performance in the few scenarios I'm not likely to encounter at home.
              This is not exactly true. Every single time a new type of RAM got introduced, it always had few benefits at first. Happened with DDR3 and DDR4 too. But i am sure you wouldn't like to go back to simple SDRAM/DDR or DDR2 in 2021, would you? Thing is, as speeds improve, software adopts to exploit said improvements over time. Unless you are switching cpus yearly and not plan to keep them for long, having the extra bandwidth can afford you some extra performance down the line. Most people keep cpus/mobos/rams for at least 3-5 years these days. It is not like performance leaps so much that you need to upgrade more frequently. By adding better RAM you make sure your PC is going to be more competitive down the line without any upgrade.

              I remember thinking like that 6 years ago when i bought a DDR3 system, just when DDR4 had come out. I said "it won't make much of a difference why pay the premium". Then a few months later Fallout 4 came out, one of my favorite games and one i have played extensively. A peculiar thing happened with that game, benchmarks showed that its FPS increased almost linearly with memory bandwidth. It may seem strange (cause most games don't get such boosts from ram speed) but it happened, probably because it was a large open world game and loading distant assets constantly became much faster with the better RAM bandwidth. You can bet i instantly regretted my decision to go with DDR3 then.... And that is just one example.

              So, if you can, why not buy better RAM? I agree that currently prices are bad though.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by TemplarGR View Post

                This is not exactly true. Every single time a new type of RAM got introduced, it always had few benefits at first. Happened with DDR3 and DDR4 too. But i am sure you wouldn't like to go back to simple SDRAM/DDR or DDR2 in 2021, would you? Thing is, as speeds improve, software adopts to exploit said improvements over time. Unless you are switching cpus yearly and not plan to keep them for long, having the extra bandwidth can afford you some extra performance down the line. Most people keep cpus/mobos/rams for at least 3-5 years these days. It is not like performance leaps so much that you need to upgrade more frequently. By adding better RAM you make sure your PC is going to be more competitive down the line without any upgrade.

                I remember thinking like that 6 years ago when i bought a DDR3 system, just when DDR4 had come out. I said "it won't make much of a difference why pay the premium". Then a few months later Fallout 4 came out, one of my favorite games and one i have played extensively. A peculiar thing happened with that game, benchmarks showed that its FPS increased almost linearly with memory bandwidth. It may seem strange (cause most games don't get such boosts from ram speed) but it happened, probably because it was a large open world game and loading distant assets constantly became much faster with the better RAM bandwidth. You can bet i instantly regretted my decision to go with DDR3 then.... And that is just one example.

                So, if you can, why not buy better RAM? I agree that currently prices are bad though.
                So you would not save yourself $200 on DDR5 that performs the same as DDR4 today, because in a few years or so it might perform better? That doesn't make sense.
                Nothing you do today will become so memory intensive to make DDR5 worth it before Alder lake becomes obsolete.

                Either way, claiming Alder Lake will not sell because some people would rather futureproof is a little out there.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by hiryu View Post

                  This.

                  Now that it looks like HEDT is a long ways out for Intel and AMD both... I may just go with the Ryzen refresh that's supposed to be out early 2022 to replace my aging 10980xe. At least I'll be able to get get memory for it.
                  I think such an upgrade would be a waste of money, honestly. It is not like your cpu is slow to begin with. Unless money is not an issue for you, of course. I personally would hold on to your "aging" cpu (lol) and upgrade a year from now to the 13th Intel gen + DDR5 . Just a few months more to wait from the Ryzen refresh.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by bug77 View Post

                    So you would not save yourself $200 on DDR5 that performs the same as DDR4 today, because in a few years or so it might perform better? That doesn't make sense.
                    Nothing you do today will become so memory intensive to make DDR5 worth it before Alder lake becomes obsolete.

                    Either way, claiming Alder Lake will not sell because some people would rather futureproof is a little out there.
                    Alder Lake will obviously sell, like all Intels do, i just don't think it is a good value for money right now for most people. Yes being forced to use DDR4 on it is making it look bad, because the slower memory will cut from its potential IPC gains plus its igpu performance. Not to mention the relatively poor scheduler support right now, even on Windows 11. It is the same situation as buying high end Skylake in 2015 with DDR3 on it. If you were to use DD3, why not buy (or stay to) a Haswell/Broadwell instead? Cheaper and not that much worse in performance. Similar thing to today, why not get a Rocket Lake, currently the best performance/money on the desktop? Yes it uses more power than Ryzen, so what? You are not depending on a battery and the difference in your power bill will be miniscule at worst. Once DDR5 becomes available and more affordable, THEN Alder Lake will become a better proposition because DDR5 will unlock its full potential.

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