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Intel Begins Preparing Linux Graphics Driver For Multi-Tile Hardware

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  • Intel Begins Preparing Linux Graphics Driver For Multi-Tile Hardware

    Phoronix: Intel Begins Preparing Linux Graphics Driver For Multi-Tile Hardware

    Intel has been preparing Xe HP bring-up for many months already including fundamental work around their discrete graphics/accelerator support for their Linux graphics driver stack going back quite a while. On the Xe HP front, Friday afternoon brought an important patch series posted for the first time: initial work around multi-tile support...

    https://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pa...nux-Multi-Tile

  • #2
    This question is somewhat off topic, but isn't this kind of architecture particularly well suited to tiled rendering? Seems like a natural way to split up the workload, yet Intel seems to be taking the immediate mode rendering approach.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by brucethemoose View Post
      This question is somewhat off topic, but isn't this kind of architecture particularly well suited to tiled rendering? Seems like a natural way to split up the workload, yet Intel seems to be taking the immediate mode rendering approach.
      yes, tiled rendering is good for chiplets/tiles arch, but im happy to inform you intel has done at least partial tiled rendering since Gen11

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      • #4
        Oh how I hope having a third supplier of graphics cards makes it possible to actually buy one.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by MadeUpName View Post
          Oh how I hope having a third supplier of graphics cards makes it possible to actually buy one.
          Intel's going to be using TSMC for their consumer GPU cards, so the supply issues are not going away.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by numacross View Post

            Intel's going to be using TSMC for their consumer GPU cards, so the supply issues are not going away.
            The graphics card supply issues may or may not abate but saying that because Intel is using TSMC it is guaranteed it won't is nonsense. First Intel is using a different line than AMD so they aren't taking space from AMD graphics to make Intel graphics. We don't know who Intel was competing against for the 6nm process but it wasn't AMD because AMD is is on 7nm and is moving to 5nm. We don't know how much capacity Intel have bought and we don't know what their yield rates will be. Until they start releasing cards it's all a big question mark.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by MadeUpName View Post

              The graphics card supply issues may or may not abate but saying that because Intel is using TSMC it is guaranteed it won't is nonsense. First Intel is using a different line than AMD so they aren't taking space from AMD graphics to make Intel graphics. We don't know who Intel was competing against for the 6nm process but it wasn't AMD because AMD is is on 7nm and is moving to 5nm. We don't know how much capacity Intel have bought and we don't know what their yield rates will be. Until they start releasing cards it's all a big question mark.
              AMD skipping 6nm is not confirmed, there is a lot of rumors flying around: "Zen3 XT" using Zen 3+ on N6 process, which is supposedly a separate product from the V-Cache Zen 3. There's also Ryzen Embedded V3000, which supposedly is Zen3+RDNA2+DDR5 also on 6nm.
              The N6 process itself is "An evolution of TSMC's 7nm node, N6 will continue to use the same design rules, making it easier for companies to get started on the new process." Which brings to question whether the output is shared with N7/N7+, or rather how much is shared between those processes. Since it uses the same design rules, then maybe AMD plans on using it for more products, like Threadrippers? Only they know :P
              There's a lot of questions, but hoping that supply issues will improve from this product is futile, not only because of the manufacturing side, but also the despicable scalping practices.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by numacross View Post
                There's a lot of questions, but hoping that supply issues will improve from this product is futile, not only because of the manufacturing side, but also the despicable scalping practices.
                True, which is why I've reached the conclusion that building a new PC by hunting down new parts is a futile process for the foreseeable future; hence why I'm reluctantly accepting that OEMs do indeed provide value in these dark times.

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                • #9
                  Yikes look at all that glue they would need for all those chiplets...

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                  • #10
                    So Intel is knocking at TSMC's door for advanced GPU silicon hum? I guess all those theories of "Intel's 10nm is equal to TSMC's 7nm", where all fanboy BS to cover Intel falling behind in the race.

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