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The Current State Of Intel Discrete Graphics On Linux: Almost "Fully Functional"

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  • The Current State Of Intel Discrete Graphics On Linux: Almost "Fully Functional"

    Phoronix: The Current State Of Intel Discrete Graphics On Linux: Almost "Fully Functional"

    Along with bringing up DG2/Alchemist graphics card support on Linux, Intel engineers have been working to square away their support for the DG1 developer graphics card. This week thanks to XDC2021 is a fresh status update about what is working with this initial Intel graphics card on their open-source driver and what remains in the works...

    https://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pa...Status-XDC2021

  • #2
    So, it appears that "code drop from a big vendor" isn't Intel.

    Amazing though. I wish I could buy one of these Intel cards since NVIDIA is closed-source and AMD is rather unstable sometimes.

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    • #3


      And with today's news of Rust code in Mesa, "programmed in multiple techniques."

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      • #4
        Any words on DG2 support in laptops?

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        • #5
          Originally posted by tildearrow View Post
          So, it appears that "code drop from a big vendor" isn't Intel.

          Amazing though. I wish I could buy one of these Intel cards since NVIDIA is closed-source and AMD is rather unstable sometimes.
          The newer ones aren't. AMD's 6800 series is superb.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by krzyzowiec View Post

            The newer ones aren't. AMD's 6800 series is superb.
            It's variable. For some it's rock solid (like me using Vega FE and Mesa 19.0), and for some it is super unstable (like several Navi owners).

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            • #7
              Originally posted by tildearrow View Post
              It's variable. For some it's rock solid (like me using Vega FE and Mesa 19.0), and for some it is super unstable (like several Navi owners).
              This may be very unpopular, but weird crashes occurring all of a sudden without identifiable event during regular desktop usage or gaming, while other users with similar desktop PC setups (not mobile ACPI bug nightmares) experiencing zero issues, is very likely hardware or user config issue (broken hardware, unstable default clocks, hardware bugs, amdvlk shenanigans...). Linux tends to be less forgiving than Windows in case something's off.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by tildearrow View Post

                It's variable. For some it's rock solid (like me using Vega FE and Mesa 19.0), and for some it is super unstable (like several Navi owners).
                I'm talking about RDNA2 chips only.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by aufkrawall View Post
                  This may be very unpopular, but weird crashes occurring all of a sudden without identifiable event during regular desktop usage or gaming, while other users with similar desktop PC setups (not mobile ACPI bug nightmares) experiencing zero issues, is very likely hardware or user config issue (broken hardware, unstable default clocks, hardware bugs, amdvlk shenanigans...). Linux tends to be less forgiving than Windows in case something's off.
                  PSU. It's nearly *always* the PSU.

                  AFTER that, yeah, that's when you look at timings etc - but do yourself a favor and always that the PSU is really delivering its claimed output (and stably so) first.

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