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Linux Disables Intel's New ENQCMD Feature Since Kernel Code "Broken Beyond Repair"

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  • Linux Disables Intel's New ENQCMD Feature Since Kernel Code "Broken Beyond Repair"

    Phoronix: Linux Disables Intel's New ENQCMD Feature Since Kernel Code "Broken Beyond Repair"

    For two years now we have seen various open-source patches around ENQCMD instructions for the code compilers and the Linux kernel. This Enqueue Stores support is part of Intel's Data Streaming Accelerator coming with Xeon Scalable "Sapphire Rapids". But even with Sapphire Rapids not launching until later this year, the already merged Linux kernel code is force-disabling the ENQCMD instructions support as the current kernel support is deemed "broken beyond repair" and will need to be reworked...

    https://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pa...Disable-ENQCMD

  • #2
    this must be this amazing open source enablement patches the Intel fans always refer to? :-/

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    • #3
      And here I thought Intel was always the best at contributing to the Linux kernel/community? At least that's what I always read in the Phoronix comments………

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      • #4
        You guys realize this is for hardware which hasn't launched yet, right?

        So yeah, it kind of is a sign of good open source support, that their very early pre-release code is already in the kernel. It just needs to be fixed up before the actual release.

        Better that than getting added a few months after release and still needing to get fixed.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by rene View Post
          this must be this amazing open source enablement patches the Intel fans always refer to? :-/
          There are some engineering disasters along the way, but I guess the overall picture is still decent enough?!

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          • #6
            Originally posted by smitty3268 View Post
            You guys realize this is for hardware which hasn't launched yet, right?

            So yeah, it kind of is a sign of good open source support, that their very early pre-release code is already in the kernel. It just needs to be fixed up before the actual release.

            Better that than getting added a few months after release and still needing to get fixed.
            Totally irrelevant. It doesn't change the fact that the process was so fucked up end to end.

            More like a bad sign of broken open source process. Quite embarrassing.

            Not really. If it was added a few months later it wouldn't have been broken.

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