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Intel Launches Core i5-1155G7 + Core i7-1195G7 Tiger Lake Processors

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  • #11
    Really curious to know just how much attention the chip pays to that 28W TDP, or whether it'll happily suck down 50W+... with commensurate heat output. Of course, it'll all be blamed on the manufacturers. Not Intel's fault at all that they don't stick to specifications when it provides a marketing advantage. Not like Intel haven't given strict requirements for use of their equipment before.

    edit: (As I forgot to comment on coder's first post ) I'm really, really disappointed in Intel's announced new NUC. 8L volume? The whole point of the NUC was tiny, full PC. At 8L, it's basically an Intel-branded Shuttle. I don't want or need the ability to stick a 30cm GPU in a NUC. If I need an external GPU, just makes sure the box has 2-4 Thunderbolt ports, then I can hang what I want off it.
    Paradigm Shifter
    Senior Member
    Last edited by Paradigm Shifter; 31 May 2021, 09:06 PM.

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    • #12
      Originally posted by Paradigm Shifter View Post
      Really curious to know just how much attention the chip pays to that 28W TDP, or whether it'll happily suck down 50W+... with commensurate heat output.
      From what I've read, the boost specs are for 50W. Of course, that should be time limited. So, you'd better not mind your laptop sounding like a hairdryer, for brief spans of time.

      Originally posted by Paradigm Shifter View Post
      I'm really, really disappointed in Intel's announced new NUC. 8L volume? The whole point of the NUC was tiny, full PC. At 8L, it's basically an Intel-branded Shuttle.
      That's exactly what it is. NUC (Next Unit of Computing) was once Intel's attempt to define desktop computing in the post-PC era. Now, it has become just another meaningless branding name.

      However, don't get confused between the CPUs in this article and their new 2nd gen NUC Extreme (gen1 was Coffee Lake-based). The NUC Extreme products use what is essentially a desktop CPU (the 8-core Tiger Lake H-series) and an actual desktop GPU. This article is about the U-series 4-core Tiger Lake range, which supposedly are used in the traditional mini-STX NUC form factor.

      Originally posted by Paradigm Shifter View Post
      I don't want or need the ability to stick a 30cm GPU in a NUC. If I need an external GPU, just makes sure the box has 2-4 Thunderbolt ports, then I can hang what I want off it.
      Well, if you know you're going to use a GPU from the outset, then this is a cheaper, more compact, and better-performing option. I don't actually object to the product, itself -- just the name. Don't forget that Thunderbolt limits you to PCIe 3.0 x4 and I think the new NUC extreme has a PCIe 4.0 x16 slot. And that's going to result in a measurable difference (if not always a huge one) in most things.

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      • #13
        Originally posted by coder View Post
        From what I've read, the boost specs are for 50W. Of course, that should be time limited. So, you'd better not mind your laptop sounding like a hairdryer, for brief spans of time.
        The problem is, it doesn't seem to be brief spans of time. Every Intel CPU I've used since the 7700K has tried its best to stay beyond its maximum all-core-boost clocks... for desktop CPUs it's not really an issue with a decent cooler (beyond sucking down a lot more power than the trumpeted specs would indicate) but on a laptop and my little NUC, it's quite noticeable just how much the fan stays at full speed.

        Originally posted by coder View Post
        However, don't get confused between the CPUs in this article and their new 2nd gen NUC Extreme (gen1 was Coffee Lake-based). The NUC Extreme products use what is essentially a desktop CPU (the 8-core Tiger Lake H-series) and an actual desktop GPU. This article is about the U-series 4-core Tiger Lake range, which supposedly are used in the traditional mini-STX NUC form factor.
        As long as the tiny one doesn't vanish in favour of the Shuttle-not-a-Shuttle...

        Originally posted by coder View Post
        Well, if you know you're going to use a GPU from the outset, then this is a cheaper, more compact, and better-performing option. I don't actually object to the product, itself -- just the name. Don't forget that Thunderbolt limits you to PCIe 3.0 x4 and I think the new NUC extreme has a PCIe 4.0 x16 slot. And that's going to result in a measurable difference (if not always a huge one) in most things.
        Most of the time, my little NUC with Iris Pro graphics does exactly what I need it to without requiring a dGPU. It's just that, like my current laptop, there are times when I'd really like to be able to do some things which basically mean I need to throw a (half decent) CUDA GPU at them. Both for quickly visualising something without having to wait for a dedicated processing box to finish its current run, and for just tossing some proof-of-concept code together. For either purpose, Thunderbolt serves its purpose without imposing too bad a bottleneck. But I guess my use case is a bit rare.

        Honestly, if this had a few more cores, I'd be interested in it (depending on price, of course) to replace my old mini-ITX box which is in a Raijintek Metis (about 14L, I think?)... I've been trying to find a replacement for it for a while, as I've become really sick of how poor the cooling is. A single intake, and no exhaust is... not ideal.

        But calling it a NUC is... misleading, given what the NUC line was originally proposed to be.

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        • #14
          Originally posted by Paradigm Shifter View Post
          The problem is, it doesn't seem to be brief spans of time. Every Intel CPU I've used since the 7700K has tried its best to stay beyond its maximum all-core-boost clocks... for desktop CPUs it's not really an issue with a decent cooler (beyond sucking down a lot more power than the trumpeted specs would indicate) but on a laptop and my little NUC, it's quite noticeable just how much the fan stays at full speed.
          I don't expect laptops to boost longer than Intel recommends, other than in gaming laptops. If anything, most laptops will probably boost below Intel's specifications, in order to save money, weight, and bulk on the cooling solution.

          Also, your NUC's fan speed isn't a good indicator of whether the CPU is running beyond the recommended power limits. There's a way you can read how much power the CPU is using, though I don't speak from firsthand experience.

          Originally posted by Paradigm Shifter View Post
          As long as the tiny one doesn't vanish in favour of the Shuttle-not-a-Shuttle...
          The NUC11-series was announced near the beginning of the year. In some markets, you might only find the NUC11 Pro, which are still the same thing + a few extra features. They both have (mostly) Tiger Lake quad-core, though the bottom tier almost certainly has some Gracemont-based Jasper Lake or whatever.

          Originally posted by Paradigm Shifter View Post
          Honestly, if this had a few more cores, I'd be interested in it
          It has 8 cores/16-threads and a 1-core boost clock of 5.3 GHz.

          If you need more than that, you're either in Ryzen or HEDT/workstation territory.

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