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Intel Xe Graphics Are Looking Great On Linux 5.11 With Nice Performance Uplift

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  • darkbasic
    replied
    Originally posted by bridgman View Post

    Have you looked at perf/watt numbers for RDNA2 ? In Michael's tests as well as Windows tests the latest generation is at or near the top in terms of power/perf:

    https://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pa...00-linux&num=1 (near the end)

    https://www.techpowerup.com/review/a...800-xt/36.html
    Honestly I think the real reason to buy Intel GPUs will be hardware virtualization support.

    Leave a comment:


  • bridgman
    replied
    Originally posted by fagzal View Post
    Well, on Linux, NVidia proprietary is still troublesome and buggy, Nouveau is slow, AMD cards tend to consume twice as much power... we are pretty much left with Intel, even if it's the slowest solution, at least it works.
    Have you looked at perf/watt numbers for RDNA2 ? In Michael's tests as well as Windows tests the latest generation is at or near the top in terms of power/perf:

    https://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pa...00-linux&num=1 (near the end)

    https://www.techpowerup.com/review/a...800-xt/36.html

    Leave a comment:


  • ms178
    replied
    Originally posted by Hibbelharry View Post

    I don't expect too much for 2021. The game is heating up for AMD and Nvidia, both are seriously advancing currently and won't stop. Both have years of experience in selling working high performance GPUs, while Intel doesn't. Intel is also still messing around with their manufacturing process, delaying each and every product. I don't think they'll be able to place big orders at TSMC, since Apple, AMD and others offer a different kind of perspective for TSMC. And: their prior tries building a high performance GPU really sucked big time. I expect intel to be able to build something vaguely competing in the entry to mid level, i expect them to fail in any other regard until they reach at least their second or third generation of their now bigger efforts.
    I am more optimistic but out of necessity, Intel acquired a lot of talent over the years, they also have the deep pockets and hopefully the determination to iterate on their offerings to keep up to AMD's and Nvidia's pace. But if the market will be as hungry for more GPUs as it is now when entering the market, they are going to sell anything they bring to the table if the price/performance ratio is right. The rumor mill says that Xe-HPG will be on 6 nm TSMC, so manufacturing should not be an issue.

    I believe it when I see it though.

    Leave a comment:


  • fagzal
    replied
    Well, on Linux, NVidia proprietary is still troublesome and buggy, Nouveau is slow, AMD cards tend to consume twice as much power... we are pretty much left with Intel, even if it's the slowest solution, at least it works.

    Leave a comment:


  • Archprogrammer
    replied
    Not really relevant, but I'm a bit amused by the "Xe Max" moniker - this sounds a lot like "XEmacs", which was widely regarded as somewhat slow about 25 years ago (I'm a Vim person myself).

    I'm not sure anyone else remembers this, but I thought it was quite funny with Intel naming its latest graphics effort after something regarded as slow (even if it was quite some while ago).

    Leave a comment:


  • Kano
    replied
    I think Intel has got a lots of projects running in parallel right now. Their former strengh with own fabs does not seem to exist anymore. Will be intersting if they outsource the external gfx chips to TSMC - as those tend to be really huge and they know what they do. I really want to see a 3rd competitor in the gaming market. AMD's strategy to split production from development was mainly born due to lack of money but looks right now a bit smarter - but this can change of course again in the future. What could also happen is that similar chips to the ones used by PS5/XBSX with GDDR memory could enter gaming laptops. I guess that AMD has got "exclusive" deals with Sony/MS but Intel most likely not. I would certainly experiment in that area.

    Leave a comment:


  • darkbasic
    replied
    Originally posted by Sonadow View Post
    Is a VM still required to take advantage of the Xe Max dGPU under Linux?

    If it is, then the Xe + Xe Max laptop solution is only going to be good on Windows.
    What do you mean?

    Leave a comment:


  • DooMMasteR
    replied
    Still, graphics drivers for Haswell and SkyLake are so bad that is really makes me hate Intel graphics :-(.
    The issues are just too annoying to consider them good.

    Leave a comment:


  • Sonadow
    replied
    Is a VM still required to take advantage of the Xe Max dGPU under Linux?

    If it is, then the Xe + Xe Max laptop solution is only going to be good on Windows.

    Leave a comment:


  • torsionbar28
    replied
    I don't expect they will have anything competitive in the consumer gaming market any time soon. Knowing Intel, my guess is they start with entry level workstation cards. Something that competes with AMD WX3200 and Nvidia P1000. They are relatively low performance, low TDP, but still return a far greater profit margin than similar spec gamer cards. If they can convince the OEM's to make the Intel Xe the default card in new workstations, they'll get significant volume right off the bat.

    Leave a comment:

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